Starting Own Trucking Authority......No CDL

Topic 24390 | Page 3

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Victor M.'s Comment
member avatar

If you want to jump in and make a small fortune, start with a large fortune. I am an O/O leased onto a mega with my own, paid-for truck and it can be a tough go. I would not recommend it to anyone with zero experience driving.good-luck.gif

Got it.

It may be more realistic to just start driving for a large company and get experience first.

Victor M.'s Comment
member avatar

Victor you're gonna have to realize how critical productivity is in this job. It is a performance based income. Rookie drivers just have a hard time breaking into the really great money that's available to the street smart experienced drivers. I see it all the time. Many rookie drivers give up long before they get the hang of things. Some of them never "get it" and settle for making half of their potential.

Personally it took me about four years to really get my stride out here. I'm a top producer now getting plenty of special treatment and excellent wages. That takes time, and a really strong track record of over performing your dispatcher's expectations. That is not easy, nor will it happen quickly. There is a lot more to this than most people realize.

The potential for success is here for anyone to capitalize on, but the reality is that only about 4 or 5% of the people who try it truly go on to a successful career. That's how tough it is. There are literally thousands of new drivers starting this career each month, and literally that many bailing out at the same time.

Just for the sake of illustration I'm going to show you my pay stub this week. It was a typical week for me (3,300 miles), but it would be an unheard of week for most new drivers.

0062193001548536100.jpg

I work really crazy hours and love what I do. Eighty hour weeks are very common for me, and I really only go home for a couple of days each month. My point in all this is to help you realize the commitment involved in this career. You can't get to the top levels of pay without proving you are worth it. We don't have salaries, we only get paid for what we accomplish. That can be a blessing or a curse depending on your ability to make things happen out here. If you do this you'd better be prepared for a lean year and a half, and if you screw up some equipment you may be finished. It's not easy, but it is rewarding.

I can't say I'm that ambitious.

If I can make 70k a year, I'm good........I really am. Of course, that is largely because I have a family so our circumstances may differ.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Victor M.'s Comment
member avatar

Understand a 34 hour break at home is NOT a normal persons "weekend off". it means you just put in 14 hours then need to drive home. Then you sleep, get up eat, shower see.family and then sleep again to get rested for your next week. and drive back to the terminal. Your 34 break starts from when you parked the truck and ends when you return.

just a thought.

That was helpful to know.

Thanks.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

That is not to say you can't find weekends off, but some jobs are 34 breaks and newbies do not realize how little time that can be.

Even with 4 days home.per month, i usually sleep the first day, do laundry and shop for the truck groceries the second day, hang with my bro and sis on day 3 and 4 and back on road.

What concerns me is this, you said:

I can't say I'm that ambitious. If I can make 70k a year, I'm good........I really am.

With this statement, not only do you show your ignorance of trucking, but you are assuming we are just handed money for nothing. The average first year pay is like $40,000 to $50,000.

Yes making $70,000 is certainly possible, but it IS for the ambitious. I made $72k my second year, but i think $48k ish the first. It takes determination and perseverence. It takes commitment and communication. You need to call customers to move appointments up, you need to sleep at customers and sometimes get rushed showers. Many days are 14 hours long. it is work. and perhaps you need to re read what you wrote. Maybe you didnt mean to sound that way

When you posted your numbers for investment and cash on hand, my jaw dropped and i chuckled. I thought you were a troll too. There is no way whatsoever that amount combined would be enough to set up a company. Now you are assuming you can get top driver pay with no ambition?

This is not an industry for the flippant. Most drivers don't last through training, so the comment "If I can make 70k a year, I'm good........I really am." This is not only overconfident, but belittles the hard work we put in.

You might be better off just moving your family to a cheaper area than to jump into a competitive industry with no ambition.

sorry, im blunt, but well meaning.

Victor M.'s Comment
member avatar

Honestly, given your situation I can't imagine you getting started in trucking as a business owner. I love the idea of Linehaul for you considering your family situation. But it's highly unlikely you're going to get anywhere as a business owner in a commodity industry requiring huge capital expenditures and managing so many complexities.

If you wanted to drive and could find a job that was an upgrade in salary over where you're at I'd say consider that and then invest anything you'd like to invest in the stock market. That is a much safer, easier route to go than plopping down a massive pile of cash and going all-in on a commodity business like trucking, especially with no experience and no advantages going for you.

Could?

I can't say I've seen or read anywhere that truckers make less than 60k a year; regional or otherwise.

Unless you meant that it's hard to find a trucking job in general.

I have some in the stock market now, but not much. Sort of expecting a bit of a drop in our economy coming and so holding back.

Thanks.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I can't say I've seen or read anywhere that truckers make less than 60k a year; regional or otherwise.

Misconception and lack of knowledge in the industry. Qualified drivers with experience will make that.

heres some real numbers for you:

some dry van start at 35cpm at 125,000 miles per year, that is

125,000 x .35 equals $43,750

My company pays on the higher end for reefer new drivers at 44cpm for a full size truck and 49cpm for a lightweight with very limited living space.

44cpm x 125,000 equals $55,000

49cpm x 125,000 equals $61,250

there are bonuses.....but since that is average miles, you could run a lot less since you are not ambitious.

Now experienced drivers with clean records and no accidents can find 55cpm or more. That would put you around $67,000 plus bonuses.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Victor, you have to realize when you see salary numbers advertised by trucking companies they are showing you what experienced drivers are making. Very few rookies muster up the kind of stuff to bring in 60k their first year. It's usually 40 - 50k, maybe a little more if they're really catching on. That's why I mentioned earlier that you need to be prepared for your first year and a half to be pretty lean.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Heres examples of new driver pay. Big Scott with CFI dry van

First Year Rookie Pay at CFI

Heres mine at Prime

My Prime Rookie Pay

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar
Unless you meant that it's hard to find a trucking job in general

yes this is true too. Prime brings in 250 students per week. 75% are sent home by the end of the first week.

My class had 76 on Monday, only 20 were left by Friday. I think 14 got their CDL. i think 8 made it the 2 months of training. only 4 were left a year later.

this is hard, and not something you jump into.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Just out of curiosity how much money do you plan on "investing" and how much will you have on hand for when it is needed?

double-quotes-end.png

8-10K invested

15k on hand.

Your plan thus far would be an excellent way to quickly lose your 25k. Very little potential upside. I have been a business owner for all but 3 of the last 40 years and owned a 100 vehicle local fleet for 15. I can assure you that you should not do what you've outlined thus far...you'll only lose your money and then some. Don't do it.

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More