Swift Refrigerated

Topic 25434 | Page 7

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Jim S.'s Comment
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Jim wrote:

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Same here. Recruiters have been known to bend the truth sometimes.

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Jim this is the second such statement you’ve made about a recruiter. It’s not necessary. Your compensation is based purely on performance and your ability to grasp what is necessary to Become a Top Performer.

As a rookie driver expect to earn about 45k average and think of it more as a well paid apprenticeship. It will take most of your rookie year to absorb the very steep and often unforgiving learning curve.

Not sure if you read or studied any of the following links:

The above is time well invested and far more valuable than whining about recruiters.

As suggested earlier, start a new thread about Swift and I’m sure we can address and answer any question you can think of.

Good luck.

I am not whining about recruiters. I realize that they might not see the same things that those behind the wheel do. That is one of the reasons I am on theses forums, to get drivers' perspective on things. I use much of the drivers' input that I have received to clarify things that recruiters have said. I will have to make some important decisions here soon, and I am gathering up as much information as I can. I have read many of the resources that you listed, and have received some very valuable insights.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Scott S.'s Comment
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How's life in the chilly side Gladhand? Hope they're keeping you busy.

Gladhand's Comment
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How's life in the chilly side Gladhand? Hope they're keeping you busy.

Going real well. Was slowed down by Memorial day though. Been going all over the country and love it. Running a short load to Moberly, mo and the pick up in Nebraska on a load going to Los Angeles.

This coming check won't be good because the good long load finishes after the pay period. I got to be home by the 12th so I missed out on a good load to New York.

My dm is awesome. Lobbies to the planner for miles for me and will take a load off of me if it has me sit for too long.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Scott S.'s Comment
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That's great to hear! I have a few specific questions for you.

1. How big is the reefer tank on the trailers? Prime had 30 gallon tanks and I was just curious. 2. Do you get reefer fuel whenever you fuel the truck, or can you stop anywhere and ask?

My wife and I may be leaving our dedicated account in favor of reefer because we may be moving out of our account's hiring area.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
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That's great to hear! I have a few specific questions for you.

1. How big is the reefer tank on the trailers? Prime had 30 gallon tanks and I was just curious. 2. Do you get reefer fuel whenever you fuel the truck, or can you stop anywhere and ask?

My wife and I may be leaving our dedicated account in favor of reefer because we may be moving out of our account's hiring area.

1. The central trailer I have now is 50 and just based on fill ups, I am pretty sure all our reefers are 50 gallons.

2. Always top it off when I fuel and call it in when I am getting close to a delivery that is drop and hook or a place that is notoriously slow.

We don't have a fuel bonus, so don't sweat it if you skip a fuel stop and go to another one. I tend to not stop at stops that are too busy or too small. May depend on your dm too though, I have never had issues with switching fuel stops.

Nice part of reefer is there is less of us than van drivers. Not uncommon to dead head 200 miles + to pick up a load. Ends up making a short load worth it haha. Also all the planners are in West Valley City. So a bit easier to build relationships with them. It definitely is helpful to have a good dm too. Really changed my outlook on Swift. The fact that he knows I want to run and makes sure that I do is very encouraging.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

Do you know if when you switch, can you request a DM? Yours sounds pretty great. smile.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Do you know if when you switch, can you request a DM? Yours sounds pretty great. smile.gif

Not sure about that part, but just so you know I am out of Rochelle, IL terminal. Most the people I talked with on the phone are nice. Haven't met any of them yet though.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

That's the terminal we were slated to be out of before we were offered a dedicated run. Our home terminal is Phoenix, but we park at Syracuse for home time.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dedicated Run:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Drew Oswalt's Comment
member avatar

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Hey time does fly! I might be passing you, if I can get empty here in Phoenix.

What's on your summer bucket list?

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Not necessarily exciting for some but I want to catch the Rockies in Denver at coors field and go to Suntrust Park in Atlanta. It is a bucket list of mine to visit every MLB ballpark.

Same here! Ball games in new stadiums and eating regional food is what I am looking forward to when I go solo

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Well after two months of otr reefer I got offered a position at another company that I just couldn't refuse. It will still be OTR reefer but with a different company. Pay and some company policies at swift is why I decided to make the change. By no means will I bash Swift. They gave me a shot at a new life and taught me how to run. I am thankful for what they have done for me. I am leaving on good terms and making sure not to burn Bridges. My DM doesn't want me to leave, but he understand too. I'll give an update on this in a few months. Don't want to say much after being at the new company for just a little bit.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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