Swift Refrigerated

Topic 25434 | Page 6

Page 6 of 8 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

You guys are going to hate me for saying this; a driver in training should not be able to drive more than 62mph until they can prove consistent lane control and space management.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I would definitely agree with what G-Town says. We were governed at 63 and as a rookie I felt comfortable with that. I did, however, wish we had that Safe Pass feature Swift has. That would have been cool.

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

How are you liking the International so far? Mine had a creaking noise that my wife described as "driving an Igloo cooler" when going down the road. I was told that it was the sound of the rubber hood latches, but I didn't keep it long enough to find out for sure.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I really like it. Heard a lot of bad things and so far I can't say anything being it's still new and no problems have arrived.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

How's the OTR reefer life treating you Gladhand? Hope all is well so far. I'd like to know what kind of solo miles you are doing there as OTR.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Good so far. Compared to dry van I am pre-planned before I finished each of the few loads I have done. Also my dm checks in with me weekly and I like that reefer has a main set of planners so it is easier to "prove" one's self. It is also helpful that I have a more proactive dm now.

Can't say too much yet being I am still getting back in the otr groove, but here is the miles I have seen so far.

Load #1. Local load, Phoenix to Phoenix. Load #2 Phoenix, AZ to Denver, CO 852. Load #3 Greeley, Co to San Jose, CA 1288. Load #4 Watsonville, CA to (load has 5 stops) Riverdale, UT being the last stop. 894.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Is it true that Swift increased their governed speed to 69?

double-quotes-end.png

I wish! We're at 63 on the pedal and 65 on the cruise, with a pass smart option of 67. The pass smart can only be used for 30 minutes in a 24 hour period. This info is for company drivers, but lease ops are different. They have passed me doing 70, but I don't know the actual governed speed.

Lol, the Swift recruiter came to my CDL school. He said 69. I guess he was trying to make Swift look more attractive for recruits. How does their bonus program, and the silver and gold program work?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Please make a new thread to ask all those questions Jim. I made this thread to just give my experiences with Reefer at swift.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Gladhand one thing I really admire about you is how you're willing to do different things to find what fits you best. Instead of being unhappy you're switching divisions within the company to get different experiences. You're one of the many drivers I enjoy reading posts from.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Gladhand one thing I really admire about you is how you're willing to do different things to find what fits you best. Instead of being unhappy you're switching divisions within the company to get different experiences. You're one of the many drivers I enjoy reading posts from.

Thanks Rob. Life is too short to do stuff you don't like. Needed the experiences of being home more and barely having a 34 a week to change my point of view.

Looking to break my apartment lease and go back to living in the truck. With Swift's new creature comforts, the truck is a lot more comfortable than it used to be. Even though it was comfortable then too haha.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Scott S.'s Comment
member avatar

That's the great thing about Swift, is there are more opportunities than you can shake your finger at. My wife and I enjoyed doing OTR reefer for Prime when we were there. Things happened, and we ended up here at Swift. Our original plan was to go back to OTR reefer, then we got offered a position doing dedicated dry van across country. I have been following this thread for the reason that I'm interested in seeing real life numbers on OTR as opposed to what the terminal leader and recruiters have said.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

That's the great thing about Swift, is there are more opportunities than you can shake your finger at. My wife and I enjoyed doing OTR reefer for Prime when we were there. Things happened, and we ended up here at Swift. Our original plan was to go back to OTR reefer, then we got offered a position doing dedicated dry van across country. I have been following this thread for the reason that I'm interested in seeing real life numbers on OTR as opposed to what the terminal leader and recruiters have said.

You can definitely get great miles in dry van too. It's a matter of efficiency and your driver leader. This new driver leader I have out of Rochelle is good. He calls me daily and gives me attaboys for doing my job right haha. I don't need them, but they definitely are appreciated. My Walmart dedicated experience has given me a lot of great skills. Went to a Lowe's yesterday that had a tough dock like one of the neighborhood markets I used to go to. So I knew how to approach it. I did those 5 stops no problem, so I am definitely grateful for the grocery experience.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jim S.'s Comment
member avatar

That's the great thing about Swift, is there are more opportunities than you can shake your finger at. My wife and I enjoyed doing OTR reefer for Prime when we were there. Things happened, and we ended up here at Swift. Our original plan was to go back to OTR reefer, then we got offered a position doing dedicated dry van across country. I have been following this thread for the reason that I'm interested in seeing real life numbers on OTR as opposed to what the terminal leader and recruiters have said.

Same here. Recruiters have been known to bend the truth sometimes.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jim wrote:

Same here. Recruiters have been known to bend the truth sometimes.

Jim this is the second such statement you’ve made about a recruiter. It’s not necessary. Your compensation is based purely on performance and your ability to grasp what is necessary to Become a Top Performer.

As a rookie driver expect to earn about 45k average and think of it more as a well paid apprenticeship. It will take most of your rookie year to absorb the very steep and often unforgiving learning curve.

Not sure if you read or studied any of the following links:

The above is time well invested and far more valuable than whining about recruiters.

As suggested earlier, start a new thread about Swift and I’m sure we can address and answer any question you can think of.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 6 of 8 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More