Trucker Reportedly Forced To Alter Log Book Before Crash Awarded $80 Million!

Topic 25515 | Page 5

Page 5 of 5 Previous Page Go To Page:
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

LDRSHIP’s reply to me...

Did I once say that I edit my logs everyday? I said it IS possible. Have I ever fudged. No worse than Brett has ever done. He admits to it as well. I am NOT advocating to go do it. I am merely pointing out it is STILL a possibility. It can and does still happen. It really is that simple. I am not advocating for it. Do what one’s own conscious allows.

I never suggested that Patrick (in bold) My issue is simple:

You discribed how to disconnect your device...and basically drive outlaw and not get caught. Not cool. I know I am paraphrasing, but basically that is what you wrote. Did I get the wrong?

I then replied that if a driver attempts that with a QC or PN or any other of the ELDs that the Megas run, its grounds for termination...well you had a comment about that.

Fact is with very few exceptions the Newbies coming through here end up driving for one of the larger carriers with tightly controlled, secure and tamperproof ELDs. As such, your point about disconnecting your device is not relevant and IMO not something a moderator should be introducing to a rookie audience. I’ll stand firm on that and won’t back down. You might be able to get away with such a thing and keep your job...they won’t. That was my point...and I was fairly clear about that.

You also just wrote this:

Everyone who is productive even with tightly controlled ELDs works in a grey area often.

How so? Do you speak for all of us, or just yourself? Whatever...I totally disagree with that, especially the “often” part. All I can edit is on-duty not driving vs. off-duty. That’s it...and certainly not something that enables higher productivity.

I so much as drive over 5mph and I’m on the drive line. The driveline is not editable. Can’t speak for other companies, but the ELD Swift is running with is tighter than a Frog’s Ass.

I got nothing against you Patrick and wasn’t offended with anything you said. Your choice to work for your present company was yours to make. A choice that is likely unavailable to a rookie driver, thus some of the freedoms you have are not available to them and have little bearing on their path to rookie success.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I should clarify, but the grey area mainly applies to OTR positions. Hourly or even your situation with Walmart doesn’t apply as strictly. Mainly when at shippers and receivers, how many of us show the required amount of time then go off duty/sleeper berth. Nvm if we have to reposition on the customers property. So much is done while off duty/sleeper berth. That is the grey area I’m referring to.

I never said how to not connect to the device. Keep Trucking GPS unit uses a Bluetooth connection to your phone or tablet. ‘Nuff said.

You are right, a rookie would not work for a company like I work for. They have no business doing it. One little rookie hiccup and it is job over.

Yes, with the Omnitracs, PeopleNet and other services that use a QualComm or other devices it is usually hard wired into the truck. If you try to mess with it you will get caught. But many of the very small companies and O/Os can’t afford such expensive services and devices. They use devices and services such as Keep Trucking. They often connect to your smart phone or an off the shelf tablet.

How about this.

DISCLAIMER: Brand new Rookies have no place or should even attempt working for a small trucking company. There is a reason most require 2-3 years of experience first.

That being said, the truth of the matter is that the game of Smokey and the Bandit is still going strong, even in today’s age of ELDs.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

LDRSHIP continued...

I should clarify, but the grey area mainly applies to OTR positions. Hourly or even your situation with Walmart doesn’t apply as strictly. Mainly when at shippers and receivers, how many of us show the required amount of time then go off duty/sleeper berth. Nvm if we have to reposition on the customers property. So much is done while off duty/sleeper berth. That is the grey area I’m referring to.

I never said how to not connect to the device. Keep Trucking GPS unit uses a Bluetooth connection to your phone or tablet. ‘Nuff said.

You are right, a rookie would not work for a company like I work for. They have no business doing it. One little rookie hiccup and it is job over.

Yes, with the Omnitracs, PeopleNet and other services that use a QualComm or other devices it is usually hard wired into the truck. If you try to mess with it you will get caught. But many of the very small companies and O/Os can’t afford such expensive services and devices. They use devices and services such as Keep Trucking. They often connect to your smart phone or an off the shelf tablet.

How about this.

DISCLAIMER: Brand new Rookies have no place or should even attempt working for a small trucking company. There is a reason most require 2-3 years of experience first.

That being said, the truth of the matter is that the game of Smokey and the Bandit is still going strong, even in today’s age of ELDs.

Thank you for adding some clarity.

The grey area you speak of is more a product of the rule itself, an inability to enforce it, and less inherent to whether a true ELD is in place, or not.

And in truth, I leverage it many times.

- if dealing with a live load at a vendor back haul, I’ll show on-duty the first 15 minutes, then log off-duty until I’m green lighted

- if I am 2nd it 3rd Wally truck at a store, I’ll log off-duty until my turn comes.

Because of added logic at the server level, ELDs on Walmart assigned trucks are more strict with adherence to the on-duty status when supervising a live unload at a store or Sams. Some things can be edited out to grab 15 minutes here and there, but the leeway is highly limited.

So I do agree the grey area is something more prevalent (required) for true OTR work.

As far as the clarification of disconnecting your device? This is exactly what you wrote in a previous reply:

I use a logging app. Keep Trucking. Even if you have their ‘ELD’ device installed in your truck you can choose to not connect to it. Even though it will appear in every way that you are running e-logs, in reality every single thing is completely able to be edited. You can make entire days of work disappear. Just depends on how good you at are writing a convincing story for the DOT to look at. Keep Trucking also does not flag portions of the log that have been edited. So, the DOT officer only sees the final product. Also you can go back after “signing” your logs, erase your signature and edit whatever you want.

Your words. To me potentially misleading to a rookie or someone trying to understand trucking right out of the gate. I’ll leave it at that.. pointless to debate any further. You see it your way, and I see it mine. Peace.

Good luck with this job Patrick. I think your original thought some years back of hiring on with WMPF would have been an interesting choice to explire after your initial career with HOW. Might be less stressful, possibly more lucrative...not sure. But conformity is a very big requirement with WMPF...not for everyone, but there is a price to be paid for everything, including stability.

Again, best of luck.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 5 of 5 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More