O/O Company Advice

Topic 25731 | Page 1

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a20fan4ever2's Comment
member avatar

Ive bought my own truck and looking for some insight on which companies are better and pay percentage. Looking to pull reefer preferably but dry van is an option too. Original plan was to sign on where I've been a company driver for 2 yrs but once I seen the contract its not going to happen. Company put a 4yr non compete clause in contract stating if I terminate contract I could be held legally responsible if I use any shipper or broker that as been used during my contract agreementšŸ˜±

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Your best bet would be to talk with OOIDA or NASTC.

OOIDA:

Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association

Who They Are

OOIDA is an international trade association representing the interests of independent owner-operators and professional drivers on all issues that affect truckers. The over 150,000 members of OOIDA are men and women in all 50 states and Canada who collectively own and/or operate more than 240,000 individual heavy-duty trucks and small truck fleets.

Their Mission

The mission of OOIDA is to serve owner-operators, small fleets and professional truckers; to work for a business climate where truckers are treated equally and fairly; to promote highway safety and responsibility among all highway users; and to promote a better business climate and efficiency for all truck operators.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

This is what you told us 2 years ago...

I drove for Trans Am for 4 months. I was offered a local driving job in January driving flatbed for a lumber company. I'm making more money than I did with Trans Am. Plus I'm home everynight and off on weekends. I enjoyed my time with Trans Am but have 5 kids between the ages of 6-12. My youngest asked me to quit so he could spend more time with me. So I did!

What have you been doing for the last two years? What made you think buying your own truck was such a good idea? It seems you jumped into a business without even having a real plan or idea of who you should lease on to. On top of that you made this jump while the rates are tanking!

I agree with PJ, you need the kind of help that OOIDA gives. We really don't recommend taking your approach, so there isn't much we can offer to help you.

Good luck!

OOIDA:

Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association

Who They Are

OOIDA is an international trade association representing the interests of independent owner-operators and professional drivers on all issues that affect truckers. The over 150,000 members of OOIDA are men and women in all 50 states and Canada who collectively own and/or operate more than 240,000 individual heavy-duty trucks and small truck fleets.

Their Mission

The mission of OOIDA is to serve owner-operators, small fleets and professional truckers; to work for a business climate where truckers are treated equally and fairly; to promote highway safety and responsibility among all highway users; and to promote a better business climate and efficiency for all truck operators.

a20fan4ever2's Comment
member avatar

Wow Old School! So I went back OTR after running local for 2 months! Been with the same company ever since. If you read my post correctly, I stated I was signing on with company I'm currently at until I received a copy of the O/O contract stating if I leave within 1 yr then I cannot contact any brokers, shippers, receivers, etc for 4 yrs. Guess you missed that part, huh? So Yes I had a plan but now that plan has changed as they often do. I see nothing has changed here in this forum and those that say they'll offer advice or help others still down drivers for the choices they make.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Well, first off you completely don't understand us. We help drivers everyday. In fact we do it tirelessly.

I didn't miss anything. I've been a business owner for most of my working life. I would never go invest in equipment for a business without already knowing what kind of contractual agreement I was entering. Nobody here considers that a good idea. There are good choices you can make in business, and of course there are bad choices.

Now, what would you think of a group of people who are keenly aware of the pitfalls of being an owner operator going ahead and encouraging people to jump in headlong without really having a well thought out plan? That's what you're wanting us to do. That goes against everything we consider to be responsible, ethical, and practical. I'm sorry we can't encourage your folly. I'm sorry we can't pamper your ego. You made this choice. Now you act like we're the bad guys for not giving you positive strokes?

You either know what you're doing or you don't. Stop trying to come off all high and mighty. We can't help you fix this. We've always sounded the alarm about this topic. The only thing that hasn't changed is your unwillingness to listen to our advice.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

a20fan4ever2's Comment
member avatar

Once again, I had a plan that was in full force until the owner sprung the contract on me. He has other O/O that are running for him and never had to sign a contract! So did I think he would make me sign one after running as a company driver for 2 yrs for him? NO, I didn't expect that at all and niether did the dispatcher or other O/O's.

I've been searching for another company to sign on with and my purpose of posting here was with the thoughts that some of you "old school" drivers would offer some insight on which companies pay percentage instead of limiting my income by running for pay per miles! A simple request. But so far all I've been told is I'm a fool and don't know what I'm doing! Great help! I'm sure all your plans in life have never fell apart and forced you to resort to a Plan B?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Why are you convinced getting paid percentage is better than being paid per mile? Let's try to reset this conversation. Maybe I can learn something from you.

a20fan4ever2's Comment
member avatar

Why wouldn't it be? A driver is limited to how many miles they can run in a week, correct? Which in turn limits their income being paid per mile. Tell me its not possible to make the same amount of money on percentage and having to run less miles, use less fuel, less wear n tear on truck, etc. So yea its makes sense to me that you are better off being paid percentage rather than by the mile.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Tell me its not possible to make the same amount of money on percentage and having to run less miles, use less fuel, less wear n tear on truck, etc.

Okay, we're getting to the heart of how you're thinking now. How many business owners do you believe think like this. "I can work less and make just as much or more." That's not realistic. Are you aware that PJ is an owner operator? Look here at what he said earlier today in another conversation...

I work longer hours and much harder than I ever did as a company driver.

What's up with that? It doesn't matter how your pay is structured. You're in a business now. You're gonna need to run the wheels off that old truck you bought or you are going to be in trouble. Getting a percentage of the load doesn't change the fact that you are now responsible for producing a profit. Less miles and less wear and tear should be the furthest things from your mind.

Let me ask you this... What if you're getting 75% of the load and the rates take a deep dive? Last month a load that paid 3,200 dollars is all of a sudden paying 2,400 dollars. This stuff happens regularly in this extremely volatile business. The spot market is really messed up right now. Your 75% just got downgraded considerably because of the rate change. The miles didn't change, the percentage didn't change, but the pay sure got changed.

Let's go back to your thinking process. I don't know any successful business people who think working less will produce more. Most entrepreneurs have a diehard work ethic that puts their employees to shame. That's why they succeed. They give it all they've got.

PJ is a good example, but even he will tell you he's not making any killing at this. He's working harder than ever before, but it feels a little precarious. A major breakdown could possibly ruin him.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Buying the truck should have been the very last thing you sign after everything else is read and signed. Going to plan b before stepping foot into the truck is a pretty bad sign.

What's your long term game plan? Giving a one year commitment to a company that you undoubtedly like doesn't sound like a deal breaker to me.

Also, why is that clause in there? I'm assuming they have contracted freight. I'm assuming they're not just using brokers.

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