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Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

Figured i would ask here. I want to be home generally night. I live in the Fort Lauderdale Florida area but all surrounding cities work. What jobs can I find that would be local? I know Food service would be an option but are there any choices I am missing?

Cwc's Comment
member avatar

Depends.. How long have you been driving?

Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

Depends.. How long have you been driving?

Never. However I don't want OTR. I will not consider trucking as a career is I have to do OTR , as it just simply won't work for me. I need something local.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Viking's Comment
member avatar

You'll be extremely hard pressed to find a local gig that will take you (not that they don't exist but are very rare) without experience. Might want to look into LTL around your area. Ie ups, FedEx, old Dominion, saia. They usually get home every day. Dunno if they will take you without experience though.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Foodservice is brutal, especially in the Florida heat and tourism traffic.I was trying to get my CDL through sysco when I lived in St Petersburg and went on a ride along for a week as I was a warehouse employee. One thing I noticed about foodservice in FL (as most jobs) is its very seasonal based on tourist season. In the DC I worked out of the drivers were working mandatory 6 day work weeks during tourist season and then during off season only 3 days. If you hit your 70 hours in 5 days they sent in a work van and had to assist other drivers for your 6th day. The drivers I know down there do quite well, 80 -100k a year but the risk of injury is extremely high. I was always told it's not a question of IF you'll get hurt, it's just a matter of WHEN. I ultimately did about a year and half with Performance Food Group after I moved to Des Moines Iowa. 3 of the 5 guys I worked with at PFG suffered significant injuries. 1 fell out of the trailer and tore his ACL, another had a back injury that sidelined him 5 months and the other now needs an implant in his back that shocks the nerves. He came back and 2 months later ended up really messing up his knee when his 2 wheeler fell back on him. After being on Work comp for 1 year the company legally terminated him. I'm not trying to scare you, I just want you to be aware of all the hazards.

I know you're not interested in OTR but it really will be the best in the long run. You're idea of starting local isn't uncommon at all. We've seen quite a few people start local and get involved in a couple minor backing accidents and now they're out of a job. Alot less companies are willing to hire a rookie that has multiple accidents and was terminated. Its ultimately your choice what you do but we want you to be the best informed. If you'd like to see more I created a diary when I was doing food service. My diary I included pictures of how some days I couldn't even get in my trailer, pallets leaning and falling over and included case and weight count for each day.

If you're determined to do local work only Linehaul will be your best bet but it will be very difficult to land that right out of school especially in FL. Good luck, keep us updated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

Man you painted a brutal picture of food service. Lol The LTL i will sesrch for, but I don't think I found anything local even in that segment. I honestly thought this is something I wanted to do but it actually might not be if I can't find the right path. ITR just won't work for me long term with trying to purchase a home, maintain it and visiting family and friends. I am sure I will not like that lifestyle.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

You'll be extremely hard pressed to find a local gig that will take you (not that they don't exist but are very rare) without experience. Might want to look into LTL around your area. Ie ups, FedEx, old Dominion, saia. They usually get home every day. Dunno if they will take you without experience though.

Searched and found SAIA. However the terminals are in WPB n Miami. Pay seems solid as well but yes they want experience. Being new I am not sure what the job entails or how to get experience other than OTR. Should I can get in food service and I know the pay will be great but yeah I don't want to get hurt or bang my body up or even not be able to keep up with the work. I am 35. I am going to take a look at some of these companies and see if I can understand how it works. Lets say you work for SAIA local, you go to the terminal get your truck and deliver and bring truck back? Sounds too easy...?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Viking's Comment
member avatar

They usually have guys who run terminal to terminal pulling doubles. Same runs day in and out. Usually nightshift too I believe. This is linehaul I believe.

Then they have the pick up/delivery guys who do way more backing and dealing with city traffic.

I'm not the most experienced with LTL linehaul but perhaps bobcat Bob or someone who actually does it will chime in here.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Craig...did you read this?

Becoming A Truck Driver: The Raw Truth About Truck Driving

Your expectations are unrealistic.

For the most part local jobs are earned. But careful what you wish for...after a 14 hour day, you’ll have little time left to shower and eat before you go to sleep. Regardless of OTR or local, this is a lifestyle, not a typical job.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

OTR is where rookies learn about driving an 18 wheel rig. You are mostly on an interstate with a bit of local traffic and warehouse operations. Percentage wise you don't get into accident generating situations so much.

Local and LTL P&D involve much more local traffic and crazy dock situations where the driver needs to have way better control of the truck and trailer. These are reasons why companies may not be excited to hire a newbie.

And as Rob T points out, food service (and dollar store local routes, too) will make you really earn your paycheck.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

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