Question About Tractor

Topic 25888 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

I’m driving a 2020 Freightliner Cascadia with Detroit Engine and 10 speed Eaton transmission. I can’t seem to make this tractor pull hills right when loaded. It came with progressive shifting which I immediately had turned off. If I let this thing drop below 1400 rpms when pulling it falls flat on its face. The power band seems to come in at 1350 and stays till 1750ish.

Took to shop and talk to mechanic and he showed me that most torque is seen at 1050 rpm so took tractor back out empty and let it lug down on hill to 1050 and floored the fuel to it and it fell flat on its face again. He explained to me that the newer tractors don’t run like the older ones where you have to stay in them. So what am I doing wrong? Tips? Advice? Anything? Thanks!

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Brian, that's life in a governed truck. We all experience it. These governed trucks simply can't get enough fuel when climbing a mountain, so... going 25 mph uphill is something you just have to get accustomed to.

You aren't doing anything wrong.

Dave S (formerly known as's Comment
member avatar

I'm in a 2016 Peterbilt with an MX13. Best torque is around 1150. At 1050 it'll fall on its face going up a hill. Best horsepower is up around 1550 to 1650 which is where it pulls hills the best. At 1100 rpm I'm down shifting.

Torque will get ya going but horsepower keeps ya going.

Torque and horsepower curves are similar between the paccar and Detroit. Although, the Detroit likes the higher RPMs.

Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Brian, that's life in a governed truck. We all experience it. These governed trucks simply can't get enough fuel when climbing a mountain, so... going 25 mph uphill is something you just have to get accustomed to.

You aren't doing anything wrong.

Old School, thanks! While at the shop, we turned the speed up to 75 but I asked to adjust the torque and horsepower up also which they said they couldn’t till they talked to Freightliner. Our tractors are leased from Ryder so they are supposed to come down this week and meet with us to see if many some other adjustments can be made either with the torques, horsepower, and even something with the turbo.

Dave S (formerly known as's Comment
member avatar

25 up a hill? 10 speed autoshift sounds about right. That is from my limited experience.

10 speed manual, I'm flying up at 31!

Brian, that's life in a governed truck. We all experience it. These governed trucks simply can't get enough fuel when climbing a mountain, so... going 25 mph uphill is something you just have to get accustomed to.

You aren't doing anything wrong.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

One thing so many fail to address is the rear end gears. Many companies spec their trucks for fuel economy and will go with a rear end gear that will cruise down the highway at a nice low rpm with the engine putting forth little effort. The trade off is the truck falling on its face when it hits a hill but there's really no way around it and you just deal with the fact that you'll be crawling all the way to the top.

Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Also forgot to mention that the running gears are 3.25.:1. If this had had a 13 speed manual instead of the 10 speed manual and 3.70:1 or higher would make a difference also. Thanks everyone! I thought it was something I was not doing.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

You'll be hard pressed to find anyone using 3.70 rears anymore that isn't doing heavy haul or some sort of dump, log or regional work where you're constantly in the hills. They're much too concerned with fuel costs and with your particular setup, it's definitely gonna be a dog on the hills.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

The lowest my 2019 has ever gone is 8th and 26 mph. It's what they are designed to do for the fuel economy. So as much as I don't like it, I have come to accept it. We would all like to be not loosing momentum going up the hills, it's what it is. When I drove tankers, I had a 379 Pete 10 sp Eaton, it would climb most of the hills in 7th and 35-37 mph. I was always .axed out in all 5 compartments. Mine was an unusual tanker. 51' with 5 compartments. Most are 48' and 4 compartments. At 80,000 lbs. She did ok.

I asked of they could do something on this tractor and said not without sacrificing fuel economy, which Swift will not do. And I don't blame them with the amount of tractors that we have.

Raptor

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

You'll be hard pressed to find anyone using 3.70 rears anymore that isn't doing heavy haul or some sort of dump, log or regional work where you're constantly in the hills. They're much too concerned with fuel costs and with your particular setup, it's definitely gonna be a dog on the hills.

We run basically the mountains here in southwest Virginia. We do have 2 other tractors that are running the 3.70 gears. Here is what stumps me and that is we have 2 other Freightliners with the Detroit engines with 10 speed trannys but 3.08 gears and they pull circles around my truck. Makes no sense to me but who I am? LOL Thanks again for the wisdom and insight!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More