First Beer Load

Topic 25901 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Load should be secured:

0231581001560834822.jpg0575717001560834848.jpg0361097001560834869.jpg

Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ahahaha yep that should do the trick.

If they have the pallets against each wall is when you need the load bars instead of straps.

Those black plastic shields can also be placed on the front of the pallets, I don't know off the top of my head if they prefer them a certain way, but the important thing is that the corners of the pallets are covered so that the straps don't crumple the boxes

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Keith A.'s Comment
member avatar

I prefer placing them on the front myself because then there's no for the corner to slip out and the shield falling into that triangular space between the straps and the pallets. If you place it front side it's secured by the entire length of the strap across it's width instead of just the corner.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I prefer placing them on the front myself because then there's no for the corner to slip out and the shield falling into that triangular space between the straps and the pallets. If you place it front side it's secured by the entire length of the strap across it's width instead of just the corner.

Yeah, I didn't think about that until the trailer was already sealed. embarrassed.gif

Hopefully it holds up, the straps are holding it pretty good, but I know there is a chance it will come lose and slide back some. I'm getting live unloaded at 6am on the 20th, so I will find out.

I'll keep that in mind for the future, as no other load I've done had these shields.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It looks great. You're not going to have any problems with it. It will look exactly the same when you get to the delivery.

Remember, also, that loads almost never shift toward the back, they shift toward the front. A truck doesn't accelerate quickly enough to throw the load backward and they don't climb hills steep enough to make anything slide backward. But you can easily hit the brakes hard enough to shift everything forward. Keep that in mind anytime you consider what might happen to a load during the trip. Make sure there isn't anything that appears like it might go flying forward if you have to hit the brakes hard.

Sometimes you may have something that's stacked pretty high and unstable, so it's possible the top of the pallet could tip over backwards on a hill or something. But most of the time the biggest threat comes from hitting the brakes hard and shifting everything forward.

Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

I was just there a few days ago. Didn't quite go as hard on the straps as you did but they didn't shift. Supposedly they have an axle scale somewhere on property that i couldn't find so i winged it with my tandems. Then heaven forbid they give you your scale ticket when you leave. That's the only miller brewery that doesn't for some reason.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I was just there a few days ago. Didnt quite go as ham on the straps as you did but they didnt shift. Supposedly they have an axle scale somewhere on property that i coupdnt find so i winged it with my tandems. Then heaven forbid they give you your scale ticket when you leave. Thats the only miller brewery that doesn't for some reason.

My work assignment said to bring 2 to 3, or 3 to 4 straps dont remember off the top of my head. So I wanted to play it safe in case anything did happen, they cant say i didn't do my part Haha.

But if you're talking about the same place I picked up in Fort Worth, then the scale is not to far from the exit, in front of the loading docks when you start to make your way to the exit. Let me get a picture.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

0105072001560876564.jpg

The left circle is where you enter, and follow around the building going toward the exit, I circled where the scale is at. Cant get a scale ticket, but itll display the weights on the screen. Pretty accurate, was almost exactly the same when I went to the Cat scale down the road.

I made sure I scaled out because they had a sign that said if we left without scaling, and used a third party scale and we was overweight, then they would make you pay to have the load reworked. So I made sure to get my weight legal, and took pictures of the screen with my phone so they couldn't say I didn't or anything like that.

I dont know if you had the same problem, but the security folks had an attitude from the start Haha. I was still nice and told them to have a nice night.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Funny thing is, I only found the scale thanks to Google Maps Satellite. rofl-1.gif

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

577 miles later, I'm currently 300 miles for my delivery tomorrow morning at 6am.

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More