Swift Walmart Dedicated Out Of Grandview

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Manny M.'s Comment
member avatar

Anyone have experience with the Walmart dedicated account out of Grandview WA? For swift. I'm starting on that account after my mentorship. I've searched around and have seen a lot of Walmart dedicated threads, but the vast majority are in the NE region. But yeah, if anyone has any tips or experience, I'd like to hear them! Thanks

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

G. O. A. L - G. O. A. L - G. O. A. L

Take as many pull ups as you need, whether it's 1 or 1,000.

Never let yourself be rushed, by your own self, and by other people. Take your time.

Watch your space, in the lots and on the streets.

It doesn't matter if it's NE, SE, SW or whatever region. Every Walmart and Sam's Club has it's own personality. As you progress in the account, you will gain confidence.

And welcome to TT

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

To elaborate on what Danielsahn wrote:

I have been driving on a Walmart Dedicated NE Regional account for 6+ Years. My experience with Swift is very positive, and at the present time, no plans to change anything. Running Walmart Store Loads is either love or hate. You must hustle and learn not to waste any time if you want to earn top money.

These accounts are based on individual contracts with each Walmart DC. For the most part the operation is consistent no matter where you are domiciled. Like Daniel said; each Walmart store & Sams Club has it's own unique characteristics. What you can expect is long days; typically 12 hours, about 8-9 hours of driving. Grandview is likely a Grocery DC running outbound loads of perishables (3-zone reefer) and non-perishables, called REMIX (dry van). They should (hopefully) start you with REMIX.

You will have anywhere from 1 stop (occasionally) to 5-stops and anything in-between. The last stop is often a vendor backhaul. Reefers are always live-unload (about 35-45 minutes per stop), dry is live unload, frequently last stop is drop & hook.

I have trained new drivers and the most important thing I always advise them on is to pay close attention to the directions specified for each stop on the trip-sheet. Trip-planning overall and between stops is really important; do not rely on the NaviGo GPS.

I can tell you a whole lot more...when the time comes, about a week from your upgrade.

Good luck!

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Learn how to chain. As far as I know the Grandview DC, Corrine DC, and McCarran DC all require it. Just a way of life if you run the Pacific Northwest.

Manny M.'s Comment
member avatar

To elaborate on what Danielsahn wrote:

You will have anywhere from 1 stop (occasionally) to 5-stops and anything in-between. The last stop is often a vendor backhaul. Reefers are always live-unload (about 35-45 minutes per stop), dry is live unload, frequently last stop is drop & hook.

So obviously I'm gonna mostly be at Walmart docks, but for backhauls, would i be stopping at another company's docks? Also do Walmart's let you sleep in their lots usually? Either way thank you! I'll update you when it comes time for me to upgrade

And thanks all!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

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To elaborate on what Danielsahn wrote:

You will have anywhere from 1 stop (occasionally) to 5-stops and anything in-between. The last stop is often a vendor backhaul. Reefers are always live-unload (about 35-45 minutes per stop), dry is live unload, frequently last stop is drop & hook.

double-quotes-end.png

So obviously I'm gonna mostly be at Walmart docks, but for backhauls, would i be stopping at another company's docks? Also do Walmart's let you sleep in their lots usually? Either way thank you! I'll update you when it comes time for me to upgrade

And thanks all!

Americold, water bottling plants, dairy warehouses, egg farms, and the like, for your backhauls. You will sometimes run to other DC's.

Most Walmart and Sam's clubs will let you park there, because you are a Walmart Contractor, pulling Walmart property.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Manny replied:

So obviously I'm gonna mostly be at Walmart docks, but for backhauls, would i be stopping at another company's docks? Also do Walmart's let you sleep in their lots usually? Either way thank you! I'll update you when it comes time for me to upgrade

I’ve had weeks where every dispatch has a backhaul, others none, it varies. But I ask for runs with a backhaul; why? Because 9x out of 10 the return “deadhead leg” of a trip on an interstate will route you past one of WM’s vendors. Most are within a couple of easy miles off the interstate or major highway, so IMO backhauls are easy money. Most are drop and hook (the loads are ready for p/u) and rarely require more than an hour of extra time.

Some backhauls allow overnight parking, most do not. After a while you’ll develop a list of places to stop in the event there are not enough hours to make it back to the DC. As Daniel indicated most stores allow overnight parking and have specific instructions on the trip sheet you receive with each dispatch. To maximize earning potential, getting back to the DC every day is key, so the next day staters with a stopped clock.

It took me about 3 months before I really understood how to efficiently “run” on the Walmart Account. Be patient and don’t rush, keeping in mind there are people willing to help out; both DLs and Sr. drivers.

I’ll post a couple of links on the subject when I have a chance...

Be safe today gang!

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Manny M.'s Comment
member avatar

Manny replied:

double-quotes-start.png

So obviously I'm gonna mostly be at Walmart docks, but for backhauls, would i be stopping at another company's docks? Also do Walmart's let you sleep in their lots usually? Either way thank you! I'll update you when it comes time for me to upgrade

double-quotes-end.png

I’ve had weeks where every dispatch has a backhaul, others none, it varies. But I ask for runs with a backhaul; why? Because 9x out of 10 the return “deadhead leg” of a trip on an interstate will route you past one of WM’s vendors. Most are within a couple of easy miles off the interstate or major highway, so IMO backhauls are easy money. Most are drop and hook (the loads are ready for p/u) and rarely require more than an hour of extra time.

Some backhauls allow overnight parking, most do not. After a while you’ll develop a list of places to stop in the event there are not enough hours to make it back to the DC. As Daniel indicated most stores allow overnight parking and have specific instructions on the trip sheet you receive with each dispatch. To maximize earning potential, getting back to the DC every day is key, so the next day staters with a stopped clock.

It took me about 3 months before I really understood how to efficiently “run” on the Walmart Account. Be patient and don’t rush, keeping in mind there are people willing to help out; both DLs and Sr. drivers.

I’ll post a couple of links on the subject when I have a chance...

Be safe today gang!

All right so terrible news, the swift contract with Walmart in Grandview is ending in 90 days and we learned that during my training. So I suppose I'll have to find something else afterwards. I was thinking James J. Williams since I live in spokane. They only require 3 months of experience. HR is coming by the DC on Monday, so maybe they'll have something with more home time but I don't want to go OTR. Also I've been doing meat and produce and the weird sleep schedule is killing me

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Bre The Newbie 's Comment
member avatar

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Manny replied:

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So obviously I'm gonna mostly be at Walmart docks, but for backhauls, would i be stopping at another company's docks? Also do Walmart's let you sleep in their lots usually? Either way thank you! I'll update you when it comes time for me to upgrade

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I’ve had weeks where every dispatch has a backhaul, others none, it varies. But I ask for runs with a backhaul; why? Because 9x out of 10 the return “deadhead leg” of a trip on an interstate will route you past one of WM’s vendors. Most are within a couple of easy miles off the interstate or major highway, so IMO backhauls are easy money. Most are drop and hook (the loads are ready for p/u) and rarely require more than an hour of extra time.

Some backhauls allow overnight parking, most do not. After a while you’ll develop a list of places to stop in the event there are not enough hours to make it back to the DC. As Daniel indicated most stores allow overnight parking and have specific instructions on the trip sheet you receive with each dispatch. To maximize earning potential, getting back to the DC every day is key, so the next day staters with a stopped clock.

It took me about 3 months before I really understood how to efficiently “run” on the Walmart Account. Be patient and don’t rush, keeping in mind there are people willing to help out; both DLs and Sr. drivers.

I’ll post a couple of links on the subject when I have a chance...

Be safe today gang!

double-quotes-end.png

All right so terrible news, the swift contract with Walmart in Grandview is ending in 90 days and we learned that during my training. So I suppose I'll have to find something else afterwards. I was thinking James J. Williams since I live in spokane. They only require 3 months of experience. HR is coming by the DC on Monday, so maybe they'll have something with more home time but I don't want to go OTR. Also I've been doing meat and produce and the weird sleep schedule is killing me

I wonder whats going on with Walmart and Swift? The Mccarren Acct is ending too.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Manny M.'s Comment
member avatar

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Manny replied:

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So obviously I'm gonna mostly be at Walmart docks, but for backhauls, would i be stopping at another company's docks? Also do Walmart's let you sleep in their lots usually? Either way thank you! I'll update you when it comes time for me to upgrade

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I’ve had weeks where every dispatch has a backhaul, others none, it varies. But I ask for runs with a backhaul; why? Because 9x out of 10 the return “deadhead leg” of a trip on an interstate will route you past one of WM’s vendors. Most are within a couple of easy miles off the interstate or major highway, so IMO backhauls are easy money. Most are drop and hook (the loads are ready for p/u) and rarely require more than an hour of extra time.

Some backhauls allow overnight parking, most do not. After a while you’ll develop a list of places to stop in the event there are not enough hours to make it back to the DC. As Daniel indicated most stores allow overnight parking and have specific instructions on the trip sheet you receive with each dispatch. To maximize earning potential, getting back to the DC every day is key, so the next day staters with a stopped clock.

It took me about 3 months before I really understood how to efficiently “run” on the Walmart Account. Be patient and don’t rush, keeping in mind there are people willing to help out; both DLs and Sr. drivers.

I’ll post a couple of links on the subject when I have a chance...

Be safe today gang!

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

All right so terrible news, the swift contract with Walmart in Grandview is ending in 90 days and we learned that during my training. So I suppose I'll have to find something else afterwards. I was thinking James J. Williams since I live in spokane. They only require 3 months of experience. HR is coming by the DC on Monday, so maybe they'll have something with more home time but I don't want to go OTR. Also I've been doing meat and produce and the weird sleep schedule is killing me

double-quotes-end.png

I wonder whats going on with Walmart and Swift? The Mccarren Acct is ending too.

Yeah I guess they're actively losing money? I decided on staying with swift but as a team driver. Currently looking for one. Until then they have a western 11 kraft dedicated that I'll probably do.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

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