Researching Who To Train/drive With

Topic 26054 | Page 1

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inthe740's Comment
member avatar

First off I am new here and have found this forum to be informative.

Here is where am. I am a nearly 41 year old in not so great shape guy and looking for a new career. Bored one morning I was looking around and decided WTH, I will be a truck driver. I have wanted to do this for awhile but was a single parent but my child is now an adult and I’m thinking it is time. I do not have a CDL but have my permit.

I have done a ton of research but still need to figure out where to go. I actually am scheduled to start school on 8/19 (my 41st birthday) with Stevens. The more research I do and with their pay it kinda is throwing me off (will be 21 days with no pay) Then I looked at Veriha and Rohel, had my phone interview with Veriha today and am scheduled to have a phone interview with Rohel tomorrow. To top it off there is a local food delivery company that pays really well that offered me an interview but the working conditions are rough. I looked at Maverick but I really do not want to do Flatbed. I also have an application and physical test scheduled for Knight next week, the positive to them is the training is 10minutes from my home and they have a terminal there and she says I’d get home fairly often. I’m not going to lie, I am worried about showing up at somewhere like Rohel and failing their “agility” test. I have passed a DOT physical but again in older and not in the best shape.

I would love some feedback and encouragement and promise to try to rely to anyone that does reply. I will, if there is an interest do a training diary on here once I get started and such.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Army 's Comment
member avatar

You will get more replies if you toss this in the general questions. But with that being said, (I don't drive, just lerk) many will remind you how demanding local food delivery is. Between backing and unloading all the food on your own, it will be tough. Rob T, I believe has a long diary on this. Nothing like unloading 100k's lbs of food weekly, on a dolly.

Also not sure where you are, but certain companies hire in certain areas. You didn't mention Swift, Prime, Jim Palmer, Wil-Trans , CFI....many successful drivers here that will give you advice about there company. The Paid CDL programs seem to be the best option. Most pay a training pay, then then when you upgrade to solo, you start getting per mile. Not all companies have such a large gap with no income.

They will also say pick the company on the freight you want to haul, Flat Bed, Reefer , Dry Van....etc. My son in his first few weeks with Wil-Trans dragging Prime trailers around the country and enjoys it so far. His biggest issue right now is managing to sleep with he can and drive when he must. Don't believe all the negative reviews online.

Good Luck....There are a ton of diaries.

Chris

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Wil-Trans:

Darrel Wilson bought his first tractor in 1980 at age 20, but, being too young to meet OTR age requirements, he leased the truck out and hired a driver.

Through growth and acquisition, Wil-Trans now employs over 200 drivers, and has a long-standing partnership with Prime, Inc. to haul their refrigerated freight. The family of businesses also includes Jim Palmer Trucking and O & S Trucking.

inthe740's Comment
member avatar

You will get more replies if you toss this in the general questions. But with that being said, (I don't drive, just lerk) many will remind you how demanding local food delivery is. Between backing and unloading all the food on your own, it will be tough. Rob T, I believe has a long diary on this. Nothing like unloading 100k's lbs of food weekly, on a dolly.

Also not sure where you are, but certain companies hire in certain areas. You didn't mention Swift, Prime, Jim Palmer, Wil-Trans , CFI....many successful drivers here that will give you advice about there company. The Paid CDL programs seem to be the best option. Most pay a training pay, then then when you upgrade to solo, you start getting per mile. Not all companies have such a large gap with no income.

They will also say pick the company on the freight you want to haul, Flat Bed, Reefer , Dry Van....etc. My son in his first few weeks with Wil-Trans dragging Prime trailers around the country and enjoys it so far. His biggest issue right now is managing to sleep with he can and drive when he must. Don't believe all the negative reviews online.

Good Luck....There are a ton of diaries.

Chris

Thanks for teh reply. I actually decided against the food delivery, it maybe a bit more than I am ready for at the moment plus I want some OTR time. I have 3 choices at the moment, Knight, Veriha and Rohel, all with conditional job offers. Veriha pays more for training but less per mile when on the road but they guarantee home time every 14 days. Rohel will pay more per mile and will be doing Refer and Knight does not pay while in school but I would not have to travel for training since they have a training facility and terminal 10 minutes from home. Stevens has turned into my last resort option.

I did check WIl-Trans/Palmer and they denied me due to one speeding ticket in the last 3 years.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Wil-Trans:

Darrel Wilson bought his first tractor in 1980 at age 20, but, being too young to meet OTR age requirements, he leased the truck out and hired a driver.

Through growth and acquisition, Wil-Trans now employs over 200 drivers, and has a long-standing partnership with Prime, Inc. to haul their refrigerated freight. The family of businesses also includes Jim Palmer Trucking and O & S Trucking.

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

The agility test with Roehl is just a crt machine test. They have a video of it on their site or YouTube. I saw guys in their 60s as well as guys who weighed well over 300 lbs (not muscle) pass it with no problem aside from being out of breath.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Stevens has turned into my last resort option.

I cringe when I read a statement like this...

As an unproven student with no skills and limited knowledge, you have little to offer any company; let alone one that is arguably a top training company. Stevens will teach you to be a safe truck driver; “priceless” in every way. Probably not your intent, but thumbing your nose at them comes off as rather arrogant.

Fact, there is going to be a significant learning curve with every company. During the first year you are basically paid to learn and can expect to earn about 45k. Your income potential has everything todo with how quickly you can become efficient and safe. CPM of a few cents here and there has little effect on first year pay.

Not sure if you’ve read any of these links but if you haven’t; I highly suggest reviewing them and then throwing-out everything else you’ve read on the inter web...

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

inthe740's Comment
member avatar

The agility test with Roehl is just a crt machine test. They have a video of it on their site or YouTube. I saw guys in their 60s as well as guys who weighed well over 300 lbs (not muscle) pass it with no problem aside from being out of breath.

That’s encouraging. Roehl offered me Refer division and she said it’s an easier test than for flatbed. I watched the video on it.

inthe740's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Stevens has turned into my last resort option.

double-quotes-end.png

I cringe when I read a statement like this...

As an unproven student with no skills and limited knowledge, you have little to offer any company; let alone one that is arguably a top training company. Stevens will teach you to be a safe truck driver; “priceless” in every way. Probably not your intent, but thumbing your nose at them comes off as rather arrogant.

Fact, there is going to be a significant learning curve with every company. During the first year you are basically paid to learn and can expect to earn about 45k. Your income potential has everything todo with how quickly you can become efficient and safe. CPM of a few cents here and there has little effect on first year pay.

Not sure if you’ve read any of these links but if you haven’t; I highly suggest reviewing them and then throwing-out everything else you’ve read on the inter web...

Good luck.

I mean no offense to anyone with the comment, I just feel like they really under pay to start. .10 mile over the course of a year can be $10,000 so a decent chunk of change. I will read the links provided.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Did you miss this?

Fact, there is going to be a significant learning curve with every company. During the first year you are basically paid to learn and can expect to earn about 45k. Your income potential has everything todo with how quickly you can become efficient and safe. CPM of a few cents here and there has little effect on first year pay.

Trucking is 100% performance based. Burn that concept into your "brainware".

Top performers make top money. It's no different at Steven's; I can assure you their top drivers are making 65- 70k annually. Go to their website and click the link for the 3 million-mile driver they have featured. Do you think he is worried about 10CPM?

wtf-2.gif

Your first year (again) is all about learning... Maintaining focus on a 10CPM lower starting pay as compared to other companies is a waste of your time and has far less effect on your first year income than you believe. You have no idea if you'll even make it that far...and if you do, Steven's (like all of the other carriers) will bump your rate as you begin to prove yourself and focus on learning to be a top performing driver.

Remember what I said about performance?

Although I do not drive for Stevens', I am familiar with their training process and methodology. I believe it's one of the best in the business and will effectively prepare you for this career.

And for the record...I drive for Swift; over 6 years now and my income this year will likely eclipse 80k (have you ever read that about Swift on the internet?). I didn't achieve that level of performance over night...this industry requires commitment, tenacity, patience, consistency, laser-focus and a desire for excellence. Focus on those elements; NOT starting CPM and I promise you better pay will bless your future. Get in the game, learn how it's played...be the best.

Good luck!

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Here is something to keep in mind... one company may pay a lower cpm , while giving a fuel bonus and productivity bonus. Another company may have a higher cpm but not give any bonuses. and although bonuses sound like a little... they are a lot.

Seriously if cpm is that important to you... then try Prime that pays newbies 49cpm plus fuel, safey and on time delivery bonuses to drive lightweight trucks. My last trainee has been averaging 54cpm in one. Hes on track to make $55k his first year. And Prime's training pay after schooling is $700 per week and increases to $800 eventually before going solo.

I dont mnow what they will say about that ticket though

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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