Wilson Logistics

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Charles A.'s Comment
member avatar

I had applied for paid CDL training with Jim Palmer Trucking / Wilson Logistics. I had to postpone training one time for a family memorial. Two weeks ago I called the recruiter who was dealing with me. Everything sounded a-ok for my august start date.

Call recruiting 3 days ago and poof out of nowhere they said nope we ain't going with you. I have one seatbelt violation in the last 10 years and no other things. Been driving a straight truck for the past 7 years. So I had put my 2 weeks notice in, so now I don't have a job.

Jesus Christ bless you

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Charles, it's totally understandable that you're frustrated but I wouldn't let that stop you for a moment. There are a ton of great Paid CDL Training Programs. Apply to all of them, see who offers you a position, and if there's more than one just choose the one you feel suits you best and go for it. Don't waste a minute worrying about it. On to the next!

Did you apply for paid CDL training through our website? You can apply to a bunch of companies at once that way.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Charles if you were of any value at your old job I'm quite sure they would take you back. Just explain what happened. They will understand.

Now, as far as being "shifty" goes... you were the first one to throw a kink into things. I'm curious... how much time did you drop out of contact with them? You said you had a family memorial to attend. That's a couple of days at most, maybe three if you have to travel. How long did you leave them wondering about you?

You don't even need to answer that, but you need to realize how critical communications are in the logistics business. If you took your time and didn't bother keeping them updated regularly, you may have blown it.

Okay let's move on - that's what you need to do now. We always teach people to line up several pre-hire agreements. These companies are not obligated to you by any means. I got rejected countless times when I determined to get my trucking career started. Each of them said, "We have better applicants that we chose." What? I was spotless - 30 years at one job! When I finally had three or four pre-hires set up, I got started. Guess what happened? I got sent home from the first three orientations I attended.

Yeah, you need to have multiple companies lined up when you're ready to start. It's a crap shoot for them as well as you. Just move forward and try again, but get yourself some backup companies lined up to fall back on.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to add one more thought here. Everybody labors over this whole idea of having to pick the perfect company to start with. It's total baloney. These trucking companies are all so similar, and a rookie OTR driver doesn't really have a clue what he's getting into anyway. Charles, wherever you can get started will work just fine. The only critical variable is how you conduct yourself as a newbie.

Please don't let yourself be so disappointed. Rookie drivers just need a place to start. That name on the truck doors isn't going to help you or establish you in this career. Your success at this rests solely on your efforts and abilities to be productive and safe. The company will give you a shot at it, but the results are all up to you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Matthew W.'s Comment
member avatar

Yea Wilson logistics put in a couple no-fly rules recently, you just happened to nail one of them. These rules are one and done for us. Seatbelt violation, cell phone violation, or excess speed(80 mph or up in a truck) and you're done. The reason being is these violations hit your CSA score HARD. And Wilson logistics works hard to protect their score.

Bummer about you having already put in your 2 weeks bud.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

TonyTheNewGuy 's Comment
member avatar

Keep your head up man two years ago when I applied to go with Swift right before I had left for training I contacted a recruiter and told them I had speeding ticket in ca 55 in a 40 i was 21 I’m 23 they stopped talking to me contacting me etc. I had just passed my permit for cdl A and then I was bummed spoke to prime inc I got the ticket fixed paid it off and took a DMV class course. My advice is go with another company prime inc is a good “starter” company always look for what fits you best. Good luck

I had applied for paid CDL training with Jim Palmer Trucking / Wilson Logistics. I had to postpone training one time for a family memorial. Two weeks ago I called the recruiter who was dealing with me. Everything sounded a-ok for my august start date.

Call recruiting 3 days ago and poof out of nowhere they said nope we ain't going with you. I have one seatbelt violation in the last 10 years and no other things. Been driving a straight truck for the past 7 years. So I had put my 2 weeks notice in, so now I don't have a job.

Jesus Christ bless you

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
prime inc is a good “starter” company

To be clear, Prime Inc is a great company, period. We don't believe in the odd notion that large carriers are a good place to begin your career, but then somehow you're supposed to move onto a better place to work as if there's a better place to be than the largest, most successful carriers in the business. Here's my take on this from my podcast:

Episode 9: Are Major Carriers Nothing More Than Starter Companies?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
TonyTheNewGuy 's Comment
member avatar

I agree 100% but my experience with them prior to leaving wasn’t the best. I keep hearing from other drivers their fleet managers and etc was more in touch with what I wanted. I achieved a 1 year mark of prime time certified (on time pick up delivery with no missed p/u delivery) I asked for a 1 cent raise as I felt it wouldn’t be much to ask for as a company driver I was told the only incentive that could be given to me was for the fuel mileage bonus. I also had my hazmat. I heard certain carriers pay a higher mileage rate for just having it alone for all miles wether hazmat or not. So I asked to see if I could pull hazmat I was told they could give me loads but not pay me more for any miles. I told them I wouldn’t pull hazmat for them In that case. In the end I was just told to either go company trainer or lease operator. Keep in mind I only had 1 year behind the wheel. I couldn’t train someone and teach them the essentials to make the best of what is to be encountered I barely had any experience my self . I felt that the best thing for me at the time was to move forward. Everything else is great from roadside to personal at terminals maintenance I recommend them. I work for an LTL. carrier now. I still think prime worker better with its overall company standards but I work 5 days on 2 days off at home running linehaul.

double-quotes-start.png

prime inc is a good “starter” company

double-quotes-end.png

To be clear, Prime Inc is a great company, period. We don't believe in the odd notion that large carriers are a good place to begin your career, but then somehow you're supposed to move onto a better place to work as if there's a better place to be than the largest, most successful carriers in the business. Here's my take on this from my podcast:

Episode 9: Are Major Carriers Nothing More Than Starter Companies?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
my experience with them prior to leaving wasn’t the best

Well, the experience you're referring to was basically you making a list of demands you thought you deserved because you hit the one year mark and the company didn't jump when you said jump. That experience isn't going to go well at any company I'm afraid.

See, your perception of how this industry works was based on bits and pieces of things you heard from other drivers at other companies. For instance, because one company gave their drivers a raise at the one year mark or more money for hauling Hazmat you thought you should get the same.

What you failed to realize is that each company has its own unique pay package. Not every element is going to be the same. Some companies pay more for certain things, others won't. In the end, it all works out about the same.

What you were trying to do is to take the best elements from different companies and stack them on top of each other to get the ultimate pay package where you get the best of everything. You would get all of the raises and all of the special pay that every company combined would give their drivers. That just isn't how it works.

The reality is that you were making as much at Prime as anyone was making anywhere at that stage of their career. You just fell for the "grass is greener" thing which so many people fall for. Then they jump ship and realize there's almost no difference between the major carriers. They're all great. Even though they all do things a little bit differently, those differences are rather trivial in the end.

However, you didn't just jump to a different OTR company. Now you're working LTL , which is a completely different animal altogether. So now your job and lifestyle has a completely different set of advantages and disadvantages. The funny part is that in the end you'll wind up making about what you would've been making at Prime, possibly a little more, but probably not. Your lifestyle is going to be drastically different though. Hopefully, it suits you better than OTR did, but if not you can just switch back to OTR - no big deal.

So I don't think it's accurate to say your experience at Prime wasn't good when you left. I think it's more accurate to say your expectations got ahead of your reality. It's no big deal though. This is just part of the learning process. At some point, you'll really understand all of the nuances of this industry and you'll settle into the niche that suits you best.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
TonyTheNewGuy 's Comment
member avatar

I’m just getting a feel. Prime is great I’m not bashing them but I’ve made more here in 7 almost 8 months then I did at I prime in a year. The pay scale is higher for a company driver but I was tempted to stay at first I really love the way they work and how they operate. I asked and was given some options and the info on those options (lease/or trainer). I wanted to stay expressed that to them but in the end I wasn’t gonna stay cause it was just not financially good decision. I know you’ve been around longer and done this longer then me but I’m 23 I started at 21 driving and I’m sure there is a ton of things I don’t know. I’m not trying to be rude or argue it was just my input. For someone to keep in mind.

double-quotes-start.png

my experience with them prior to leaving wasn’t the best

double-quotes-end.png

Well, the experience you're referring to was basically you making a list of demands you thought you deserved because you hit the one year mark and the company didn't jump when you said jump. That experience isn't going to go well at any company I'm afraid.

See, your perception of how this industry works was based on bits and pieces of things you heard from other drivers at other companies. For instance, because one company gave their drivers a raise at the one year mark or more money for hauling Hazmat you thought you should get the same.

What you failed to realize is that each company has its own unique pay package. Not every element is going to be the same. Some companies pay more for certain things, others won't. In the end, it all works out about the same.

What you were trying to do is to take the best elements from different companies and stack them on top of each other to get the ultimate pay package where you get the best of everything. You would get all of the raises and all of the special pay that every company combined would give their drivers. That just isn't how it works.

The reality is that you were making as much at Prime as anyone was making anywhere at that stage of their career. You just fell for the "grass is greener" thing which so many people fall for. Then they jump ship and realize there's almost no difference between the major carriers. They're all great. Even though they all do things a little bit differently, those differences are rather trivial in the end.

However, you didn't just jump to a different OTR company. Now you're working LTL , which is a completely different animal altogether. So now your job and lifestyle has a completely different set of advantages and disadvantages. The funny part is that in the end you'll wind up making about what you would've been making at Prime, possibly a little more, but probably not. Your lifestyle is going to be drastically different though. Hopefully, it suits you better than OTR did, but if not you can just switch back to OTR - no big deal.

So I don't think it's accurate to say your experience at Prime wasn't good when you left. I think it's more accurate to say your expectations got ahead of your reality. It's no big deal though. This is just part of the learning process. At some point, you'll really understand all of the nuances of this industry and you'll settle into the niche that suits you best.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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