*New Driver*

Topic 26411 | Page 1

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David M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone and good evening. I'm very very new to the trucking industry I don't have my cdl yet. Im having a hard time finding a good company to start with I was thinking bout CR ENGLAND but recent news had me change my mind. Anybody happen to know of any good companies to stay out with? I'll pay for the cdl if I have too I just want to work for a good company that won't jip me every day. Thank you in advance 😀

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello, David, welcome to Trucking Truth! Oh, we have lots of information that will help you out. Of course there's this forum. Did you see the other one, with various Training Diaries?

Here's the Trucking Truth "starter kit". Good reading, and the High Road program will go a long way in preparing you for the Permit test:

We recommend going with Paid CDL Training Programs for various reasons.

You might read through these to help decide on a company:

At the top left, touch on the three-bars and a menu will pop out. Take a look.

Bring your questions here. We are interested in helping new-to-trucking people get a good start in their new career.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I just want to work for a good company that won't jip me every day.

Hello David, and welcome to trucking, where confusion and misinformation claim the throne!

We all understand your second guessing your first choice. We've all been there. Here's the deal. You are new to this. All you've really got to go on is the information you glean from the internet. Unfortunately that information is tainted and frankly, it's prejudiced.

Let me explain. Trucking isn't an easy career to get started. It's a complete lifestyle change. Most people think they're just changing jobs or careers, but when they realize they are changing their whole lifestyle it just gob-slaps them right in the face. They aren't prepared, and they lose out on a wonderfully rewarding career. They honestly don't even know what hit them. Then they start blaming the company that graciously gave them a chance to prove their worth in a challenging/rewarding working environment.

Everything in trucking is performance based. That's why you'll get paid by the mile instead of by the hour. Productive people prosper in trucking. People who can't produce suffer in trucking. It's those suffering souls who lay out all kinds of criticism of companies like C.R. England. Are you aware that company has a long list of "Milliom Miler" drivers? Reaching that milestone is a major accomplishment in trucking, and is managed only by the best drivers. You won't find any of C.R. England's "Million Miler" drivers on the internet bad mouthing the company. Why is that so? Because they took ownership of their own responsibilities and performed well at a really challenging job.

Everytime you read these lousy reviews of a trucking company you have to look at it through a lens that shows you the complaining driver is basically showing you how much he misunderstood the industry, and how poor his performance as a driver was.

Let me give you my personal experience. I started my career at Western Express. Go ahead, try to find a positive internet review on them - you'll be hard pressed to find one. I did really well there, and earned some great money. During that time they were hiring almost 150 drivers per week. They had to because that's how many were quitting each week. All these non producers were slamming them on the internet. Seriously, it sounded like the devil himself was running the company! I loved it over there, and got treated like a king. It was all because I made things happen out here - I got things done. That's what trucking is all about.

Hang around with us a little and you'll learn a ton of valuable lessons. We can teach you how to succeed at this. Trust me, success in trucking has nothing to do with the name of the company on the doors of your truck. I'm not advising you to jump right in with C.R. England. I am advising you to hang around with us a little, and ask lots of questions. We can and will point you in the right direction.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

I'll pay for the cdl if I have too I just want to work for a good company that won't jip me every day.

I cringe when I see this. Not because you said it. Because it's the mindset of many people who are looking to become drivers. I have seen this type of question from many, many potential drivers on this forum. I blame it on the negativity you see from a lot of other sources online.

The question you - and all potential drivers - should ask is, "How can I be successful in this industry?" Companies don't want lousy, unproductive drivers that they can "make money off of". The truth is that companies don't make money off of lousy drivers. They want recruits that can turn themselves into productive, safe drivers. If you produce...you make money...the company makes money. It's a win/win.

Also, there is a lot to learn before you become productive. Nobody comes out of cdl school as a top tier driver. You have to learn and develop skills over your first several months (at least) before you get to a level where you, and your company, feel comfortable enough for you to start having real success.

"Everytime you read these lousy reviews of a trucking company you have to look at it through a lens that shows you the complaining driver is basically showing you how much he misunderstood the industry, and how poor his performance as a driver was. "

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I missed the "jip" comment. You need to read and understand what RealDiehl wrote:

The trucking company wants recruits that can turn themselves into productive, safe drivers. If you produce...you make money...the company makes money. It's a win/win.

You will not be jipped, ripped off, or screwed by any major company. You will most probably be paid for every dispatched mile - loaded or empty. Some people are worried about detention pay, or safety bonuses, or other types of pay. In reality it won't happen. (Worst case: a company gets caught playing around with driver pay, and the government will slam them.)

Drive your miles, get your assignment done on time and hassle free, and you will get every penny coming to you.

David M.'s Comment
member avatar

I highly appreciate all the help information and advise I really need it. I understand that the internet is a weird place my poppa always said never trust info on the web. This was a lot of help and I will make sure I ask as many questions as possible before I choose a company in three months. I’m a security officer and I signed a year contract stating I will stay at the post till the contract ends and it ends in three months I’m honestly very excited to start this career I’m a single man no kids my driving record is prestine and I’m registered with the bsis and department of justice I’m also a corrections card holder. I have never been in trouble and I feel like I would be a great candidate for this job 😀

double-quotes-start.png

I just want to work for a good company that won't jip me every day.

double-quotes-end.png

Hello David, and welcome to trucking, where confusion and misinformation claim the throne!

We all understand your second guessing your first choice. We've all been there. Here's the deal. You are new to this. All you've really got to go on is the information you glean from the internet. Unfortunately that information is tainted and frankly, it's prejudiced.

Let me explain. Trucking isn't an easy career to get started. It's a complete lifestyle change. Most people think they're just changing jobs or careers, but when they realize they are changing their whole lifestyle it just gob-slaps them right in the face. They aren't prepared, and they lose out on a wonderfully rewarding career. They honestly don't even know what hit them. Then they start blaming the company that graciously gave them a chance to prove their worth in a challenging/rewarding working environment.

Everything in trucking is performance based. That's why you'll get paid by the mile instead of by the hour. Productive people prosper in trucking. People who can't produce suffer in trucking. It's those suffering souls who lay out all kinds of criticism of companies like C.R. England. Are you aware that company has a long list of "Milliom Miler" drivers? Reaching that milestone is a major accomplishment in trucking, and is managed only by the best drivers. You won't find any of C.R. England's "Million Miler" drivers on the internet bad mouthing the company. Why is that so? Because they took ownership of their own responsibilities and performed well at a really challenging job.

Everytime you read these lousy reviews of a trucking company you have to look at it through a lens that shows you the complaining driver is basically showing you how much he misunderstood the industry, and how poor his performance as a driver was.

Let me give you my personal experience. I started my career at Western Express. Go ahead, try to find a positive internet review on them - you'll be hard pressed to find one. I did really well there, and earned some great money. During that time they were hiring almost 150 drivers per week. They had to because that's how many were quitting each week. All these non producers were slamming them on the internet. Seriously, it sounded like the devil himself was running the company! I loved it over there, and got treated like a king. It was all because I made things happen out here - I got things done. That's what trucking is all about.

Hang around with us a little and you'll learn a ton of valuable lessons. We can teach you how to succeed at this. Trust me, success in trucking has nothing to do with the name of the company on the doors of your truck. I'm not advising you to jump right in with C.R. England. I am advising you to hang around with us a little, and ask lots of questions. We can and will point you in the right direction.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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