Sign Offer Letter Or Wait For Others (or Both)?

Topic 26847 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

Things are moving along for me now. I got an offer letter from Roehl to start their company paid training (GYCDL) program on 11/18. I've also been talking to Several other companies. After weeding out a few that didn't seem to fit my needs, I'm talking with Veriha and Prime. My question is should I wait to see how the process works out with the other two, or, go ahead and sign off on Roehl as I think that's going to be a good fit for me. I've seen a posts saying to get as many pre offer letters as possible. Is there anything wrong with signing this one and possibly changing my mind later if there is another offer I like better? or is that bad form?

Also, I'm still very nervous about this career move. I know thats a huge suprize, I havent read any posts yet where people are nervous about this. rofl-1.gif

Here's where I'm at - I've been a salaried retail manager for the last 30 years or so. I make a pretty good income and even a good first year trucking income will be a bit of a financial hit. I used to love it, but retail is getting to be not so much fun anymore. Payroll gets tighter and tighter while the customers and employees get needier and needier. Finding good help is nearly impossible (like the trucking business) so employees feel they can pick and choose what theyre willing to do. I've always told myself that if I'm hit the alarm clock every morning dreading going to work, it's time to find something else to do. Everyone has a bad week or even a few bad weeks, but if it keeps going on with no end in sight, it's time to go.

I figure I have 10-15 good years to work. I want to do something where I can be independant (mostly) and I can seperate work from home. Right now, I spend a good portion of my home time dealing with work stuff.

So, Bottom line is that I know it's time to do something else. My worry is that 1) I make a good income now and need to have confident that I can pay the bills driving a truck. 2) The stories about people getting sent home from training for not catching on terrify me. (See multiple I failed, or I got sent home posts) 3) The variability of the mileage. I'm used to the same paycheck every week. If I have a few bad weeks, it could make for a very bad situation.

Ok, That might have turned into rambling, I'm also kinda new to this forum stuff. I didn't mean to ask a bunch of unanswerable questions. I just need someone to hold my hand, pat my head and tell me it'll all be ok. or, give me a swift kick and tell me to suck it up. My wife and family are onboard with whatever I decide and they support my desire to move on from what I'm doing, but, I'm acutely aware that It's my resopnsibility to keep a roof over their heads and food on the table. If I make a bad decision here because I was just unhappy and wanted to do something different, well, I just dont want to go there.

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Ok, That might have turned into rambling

That wasn't rambling at all. That was all very important and insightful information.

should I wait to see how the process works out with the other two, or, go ahead and sign off on Roehl as I think that's going to be a good fit for me

There's no urgent need to commit immediately. You're free to take some time and speak with the other companies. Find out if they'll offer you an opportunity and if so, see how they compare to Roehl. There's no harm in doing that and there's no need to sign anything right this moment.

I haven't read any posts yet where people are nervous about this

Believe me, everyone is nervous when they first get started in this career. It's a very demanding job and it will completely change your life in every way. There are a lot of unknowns for new drivers. It's a leap of faith, really. As long as you're 100% committed to making this happen it will almost certainly work out for you. If you decide at some point that trucking isn't where it's at you can always do something else. No big deal.

I want to do something where I can be independent (mostly) and I can separate work from home. Right now, I spend a good portion of my home time dealing with work stuff.

The problem is that trucking will separate you from home. That's a tough pill to swallow for most people. Even local jobs that get you home every night normally entail very long days where you only have time to shower, eat, and sleep. It's a very demanding lifestyle. There are very few gravy trains to ride in this industry. Almost everyone works very long hours and spends very little time at home.

1) I make a good income now and need to have confidence that I can pay the bills driving a truck.

If you're ambitious you can make $45,000 - $50,000 your first year, $55,000 - $60,000 your second year, and beyond $70,000 after that. We have drivers in this forum that are making above $80,000, but they're incredibly ambitious and have several years of experience.

2) The stories about people getting sent home from training for not catching on terrify me.

Most of the people who get sent home from training for underperforming are being sent home for other reasons, as well. Most of the time they're not committed to learning their trade, they don't get along with people, or they don't have what it takes to handle the pressure of driving a rig. If you show promise, you're extremely dedicated to learning your trade, and you're cooperative and professional they will be far more interested in making sure you get the extra help you need.

We have plenty of drivers here who didn't catch on as quickly as some others in their class but they were fiercely determined to succeed. Their company gave them the extra help they needed, and often demanded, and they went on to have fantastic careers. If you're determined enough you'll almost certainly succeed.

3) The variability of the mileage. I'm used to the same paycheck every week. If I have a few bad weeks, it could make for a very bad situation.

You can have some slow weeks, no question about it. In fact, I believe December through February is going to leave a ton of drivers begging for more miles. Things are slow now, and this should be the busiest time of the year. That's not going to improve after the holidays, which are historically the slowest time of the year.

I wouldn't make the jump unless you can figure out a way to get a little bit of a safety margin financially. The pressure of getting started in trucking is tough enough without having a panic attack about paying your mortgage if you have a slow week or two. Get about one month's worth of bills put away for safekeeping, then you know you'll be fine.

Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for your detailed response to what I thought might be unanswerable questions. I appreciate the insight.

double-quotes-start.png

There's no urgent need to commit immediately. You're free to take some time and speak with the other companies. Find out if they'll offer you an opportunity and if so, see how they compare to Roehl. There's no harm in doing that and there's no need to sign anything right this moment.

double-quotes-end.png

Perfect thanks. I guess worst case scenario, I loose my spot in that class by not committing and have to start a bit later.

double-quotes-start.png

The problem is that trucking will separate you from home. That's a tough pill to swallow for most people.

double-quotes-end.png

I was on the road for several years where I'd fly out Monday morning and fly home Friday evening. My wife says that was easier to handle because she knew I'd be away. It's the only being "half home" that's really frustrating her now. I'm home, but my mind is on work, or, im on the phone with work, or, im working on the laptop, or... It'd be nice to be home (even if less frequently) but be "really home" and not be distracted by having to follow up on who's covering the store or how are they coming with that project.

double-quotes-start.png

Most of the people who get sent home from training for underperforming are being sent home for other reasons, as well. Most of the time they're not committed to learning their trade, they don't get along with people, or they don't have what it takes to handle the pressure of driving a rig. If you show promise, you're extremely dedicated to learning your trade, and you're cooperative and professional they will be far more interested in making sure you get the extra help you need.

We have plenty of drivers here who didn't catch on as quickly as some others in their class but they were fiercely determined to succeed. Their company gave them the extra help they needed, and often demanded, and they went on to have fantastic careers. If you're determined enough you'll almost certainly succeed.

double-quotes-end.png

That's super helpful! I appreciate that. If I can control the situation with my attitude, behaviour and work ethic, that takes a lot of the nerves away. Falure isnt an option here. If I'm leaving to take on a new career, I can't miss on the opportunity.

double-quotes-start.png

You can have some slow weeks, no question about it. In fact, I believe December through February is going to leave a ton of drivers begging for more miles. Things are slow now, and this should be the busiest time of the year. That's not going to improve after the holidays, which are historically the slowest time of the year.

double-quotes-end.png

Would it be better to wait until spring? I was thinking that training in winter would be a good idea. It's be better to handle the first snow with an experianced driver than solo next year. I've been driving a Mustang GT in the Minnesota winters for years now, so I know about sliding around. I'm betting its a whole new world with 80,000 lbs behind you. But, if the freight is slow, during that time, maybe its better to wait it out.

double-quotes-start.png

I wouldn't make the jump unless you can figure out a way to get a little bit of a safety margin financially. The pressure of getting started in trucking is tough enough without having a panic attack about paying your mortgage if you have a slow week or two. Get about one month's worth of bills put away for safekeeping, then you know you'll be fine.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks for the solid advice. I've been thinking about that very thing as I rreview options. Luckily, We do have a couple months worth saved up. Not that I want to spend all of that, but, we can get through a pinch if needed. My bigger concern was just the variable checks. a few tough weeks wont kill us (looking back, I guess that's what I implied), but, it's not a great situation either (which is what I meant.

Again, Thanks for the detailed answer, that helps a TON. And thanks for the site. I've learned a lot here.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to speak on one thing, how to make it out here. It is all about attitude. Most of those who make it out here have a "can do" attitude. You have to be self sufficient. Be a problem solver. Be able to handle the days where everything goes wrong. You also have to be able to appreciate having an office with the best view. Most companies will let your wife ride with you. This is a beautiful country. Trucking is a lifestyle. Enjoy it.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

Roehl is a great company. A classmate of mine went with them, and made a very good paycheck with them, and last I knew, he was still with them. They do pay very well, and like most companies, I would gather that their dedicated accounts pay better than their OTR..... I would suggest weighing which company (or companies) is the best fit for you between pay, benefits, and "hometime" and when you have heard back from your top 4 or 5, then make a decision. I even applied to them, but decided on another carrier, and always made over $50k/year without thinking about it, and I was home most weekends and holidays 98% of the time....

I would recommend going to your local truckstop, if you have one close enough to you, and go into the restaurant and talk to the drivers from various companies... You might be surprised on how honest we are about the company we work for in regards to pay, benefits, etc. My company (Werner) was good, but what made me happy, and ultimately my paycheck bigger, was the relationship I had with my dispatchers/Fleet Manager/Load Planner.... They always had me moving, and had my loads for the week pre - planned at least 10 days ahead of schedule so I could maximize my miles and clocks, But I was on dedicated accounts from central upstate NY to New England....

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More