Important Or Not

Topic 26981 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Cecelia 's Comment
member avatar

Terminals. How many a company has or if there are any near your Home of Residence. Why is this important or unimportant? Also for the experts besides Hometime, Pay and Training is there anything else you would tell a rookie is very important to look for. My CDL School I went to would tell us to look up safety score on FMSCA and cpm. That is the only thing they really preached of importance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Terminals are convenient, but not important. On home time there are a number of places you can park your rig. I have a friend that parks his truck at a warehouse down the road from him. They don't charge him, but he's offered to pay. Truck stops are usually willing to let you park for a couple of days for a fee.

Safety score is a toss up. It's a collection of moving and DOT violations incurred by drivers that also fall on the company. For example you decide to drive a truck with a bad air leak and DOT catches you, the companies score will take a hit even though they never about the leak. Never drive a truck if you feel it's not roadworthy and protect your license.

CPM doesn't matter that much. Some companies have a higher CPM and offer no bonuses or deadhead pay. Other companies pay a lower CPM but offer bonuses and pay deadhead miles.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

Hello, I find, in my opinion, that its not the amount of terminals that is important, its where they are located. If a companies terminals are strategically located throughout the country, with a larger network of trailer drop yards, it is better than having a large network of expensive terminals with large yards.

Like with my former company, they had several terminals, about a dozen or so terminals, and a few small "shop only" terminals with a maintenance shop, safety dept, logs, and a couple other admin offices spread out throughout the country. As far as home time, as long as I parked at my local truck stop, I was fine, unless I had a "high value" load, then I would need to deliver it before going on home time or securing it at a secured drop yard.

What I would suggest to a rookie is find out what major truck stops your company uses to fuel and sign up for their rewards cards to get free showers and points. Also, find out if your company uses truck stops shops, such as the TA/Petro shops for maintenance and inspections, this way not only do you get your company to pay for it, and for any extra fluids, bulbs, tires, etc., you get the points (and shower credits) to use towards in store purchases. I had always got my maintenance done at my local TA on weekends while on home time so I don't burn my clock and get in a reset.

Also, whatever company you go with, I found that if your company offers a dedicated account, you will usually get paid a few cpm more, plus safety pay of a couple cpm, plus stop pay, plus unload/assist unload pay, which all adds up to a larger total cpm average. Also, most of the ones I saw at my old company offered weekends off. My last account I averaged over 60cpm and 2200-2500 miles a week with weekends off. And your company may have an account near your home so you can be home on your days off....

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Cecilia, we all understand the overwhelming feelings that are associated with choosing that first trucking company to work with. Honestly, none of the things you mentioned are important considerations. I've never had a terminal near my home. Typically I spend very little time at any of my company terminals. There's little reason for an OTR driver to be at a terminal. I go to one when it's time for maintenance on my truck, and occasionally if they are in an area where I need to park for a ten hour break. Otherwise, I never use them.

Safety scores give you no idea about what it's like working for the company. Western Express had a terrible score when I was there, yet I had a great experience and built a solid foundation for my career while working there. I wouldn't focus on CPM either. Rookies are just beginners. We have so much to learn. Your focus needs to be on making sure Cecilia develops into learning how to be successful at this. Nobody's gonna hold your hand, and it's going to make no difference what name is on the doors of your truck.

Here's what you focus on right now...

1) How often do you want to get home?

2) What type of freight do you want to haul?

3) What regions of the country do you want to run?

That's it. Nothing more. That makes it simple. Don't get distracted from those three things. They are what's important for now.

Don't be frightened that you're going to make a bad choice. Go with a major carrier and apply yourself diligently to working at getting a grip on how this career works. Avoid the naysayers as if they had a highly contagious disease. They do, and it spreads like wildfire. We don't want to see you deteriorate into one of the folks who do nothing but complain and constantly search for a different company. It's a never-ending futile search that has no good ending.

The only way you'll be satisfied with this career is to figure out how to be good at it. That takes a lot of effort from you. Nobody hands that out or provides that ability, so don't count on the company as being critical to your success. Great drivers are content and very successful. That's what you want to be. You will discover that there's a lot of malcontents out here. You'll also find them focused on all the wrong things.

Right now focus on those three things I mentioned. That's all you need at this point.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More