TMC Transportation Training Diary. Training Is A Mixed Bag. Curious On TMC Drivers And Vets Opinions

Topic 27020 | Page 1

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Leeva804's Comment
member avatar

This entire TMC process has been quite the journey. I have to say I love flat-bedding. I enjoy the hard work and the fulfillment from securing a load.

So I want to understand why I feel so depressed being here and then all of a sudden I’m happy as hell.

First off, I’m a big ass nerd. All I did for the last 10 years is work security. Come home and play video games. Of course I’m a hard worker and I always try to do my best. I am a total shut-in and I have never traveled. Remember the above how I have never traveled for later.

So I decided to become a truck driver and passed everything on the first try. All the way to TMC where I respected and admired there process to become a trucker with their company.

I made it to my trainer truck only to be hit with reality. The real world of professional truck driving takes real patience and skill.

The issues boil down to I’m a very defensive driver and take steps to be safe. My trainer does not appreciate me slowing down when traffic ahead of me slows down or drive slow.

So I’m forced to always try and pass drivers in this truck. Now I agree if someone is driving slow to go around but there have been tons of time when I felt this was not necessary and this guy chews into my ass whenever I don’t pass a slow driver.

I also don’t like going over the speed limit but whenever I go the speed limit say 45 he tells me I gotta speed up because traffic is moving at 55 in a 45 zone. Unless, it’s a work zone or school zone speed away he says. Of course, I listen and speed up. I just never thought it would be like this.

What really bothers me and makes me want to scream is how he’s on his phone every day. And I mean everyday. No phone policy is a ****ing joke at TMC. The valuable information I should be receiving is not happening because he has to speak with his family 24/7. I should be trained all day everyday with his mouth running half the time.

I’ve been chewed out for my horrible backing when it comes to a 45 angle. I need to work on it, but not once have I had more than 15 minutes to work on my maneuver a day. Like backing in myself and using G.O.A.L.

He couches me through every backing maneuver each time I do it like a baby. I have not even been able to try G.O.A.L because he tells me every single way to turn the wheel. I assume he does this because of the hours of service. How can I improve this way? I almost hit a trailer the other night. I wanted to G.O.A.L but he insisted on telling me how much I should back up. Well, backed up and he told me I almost hit the trailer. This is why I insisted I should G.O.A.L. I’m doing it from now on no matter what.

Been with him for a week and now I understand why his trainees quit before. He’s a really good guy but his training is subpar in my eyes.

I’m quite slow to the securement process. It’s because I’ve been a shut in and have no real world skills. But I’ve worked my ass off since day one and love it. I move slow but I assume in the flatbed world that’s how it’ll be for a while until you catch on fully. So when I told him I don’t understand straps and placement I meant it.

He has explained it but has never really went into how the process works. So we were trained to go by feet by Mr. Fisher but he says throw that out the window. Told me today he would go over it with me and as of 11-11-2019 still has not gone over it with me. Guess what though. He’s told me how to secure for a week so I’ve done what he says. Today got mad at me for moving slow to get the straps tightly binded and not knowing where to place them on a lumber load which I’ve never done. While our vehicle is broke down he’s in the back on his phone when he could be outside drilling into my head the securement process for loads.

It’s obvious I need more time as I’m wanting to learn but am a bit slow to the process. I struggled with tarping but after much practice I’m now able to tarp a load. Before I sucked at rolling tarps but after much practice I’m good at it.

It takes time but I’m learning. I missed my first turn today and he chewed my ass out. Told me what I would I have done if he wasn’t there. Well, I told him I would’ve just managed. I mean he goes off for nothing if I miss a turn we can easily fix that. I just listen to him like he’s crazy. It’s not like I endanger other drivers I just have to learn from my mistakes.

He constantly asks me If I’m upset. No I’m not upset at him for keeping it real I’m a steering wheel holder and not a professional driver. I’m upset at the training process. I expected more professionalism from this.

I love how he’s drilled my ass when I make ****ty turns, so that’s a good deal. I learned and now I’m more watchful. I love how he’s told me my backing needs work but how can I improve when you constantly won’t let me practice without you saying which way to turn. Or how my securement is terrible. Which is true but you don’t even go over it with me and test me. It’s lets go to shipper and see if he remember everything I told him. I don’t on everything.

I just wish for an instant I had a trainer who really understands where I’m at. This feels like a get me to point A for pay day and we will worry about you if we have time in the 14 hour clock.

Like he drives the bounce miles and I drive the rest. He drives through all the towns and only lets me drive the highway. How can I learn to drive the towns if you drive every time? This is the second week and I still have my training wheels on.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Leeva804's Comment
member avatar

So I’ve never traveled the interstates and was met with confusion lol. Was chewed out for that and loved it. Got me to start watching for signs and paying attention more. So it’s a whole new world for me out here. I’m not giving up.

My trainer asks is this job really for me and to let him know if I will quit. I’ve told him I’ve never quit anything and I will see this through to the end even if TMC doesn’t take me.

I have a lot to learn and I just feel so slow to it all.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately there are many trainers out there who shouldn't be. We only have a couple members that drive for TMC but they're not really active so we cant give company specific information. However, have you addressed your concerns with anybody in the office? TMC is really counting on you to be a safe, productive driver for them. I'm not sure if they would assign you a new trainer or not but its beneficial for you AND them to get the best training possible. It's better to get it resolved ASAP.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Leeva804's Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately there are many trainers out there who shouldn't be. We only have a couple members that drive for TMC but they're not really active so we cant give company specific information. However, have you addressed your concerns with anybody in the office? TMC is really counting on you to be a safe, productive driver for them. I'm not sure if they would assign you a new trainer or not but its beneficial for you AND them to get the best training possible. It's better to get it resolved ASAP.

I have not because one complaint I’m 100% sure will make it’s way to my trainer. I was more curious on how I can proceed with him so I can stop getting chewed out. Everyday I assume this dude will send me home because I don’t do stuff the exact way he wants it. It’s not like I don’t want to but it’s a lot to process. And I firmly believe no trainer should sleep in the back while a trainee is driving, but he wants to know he can be in the sleeper while I drive and not worry. Well, he’s been going back there and I just don’t like it. This feels like I’m making him all the money and getting only bits and pieces of training only when I mess up and not constantly throughout the day.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I have not because one complaint I’m 100% sure will make it’s way to my trainer.

if it's true then you have no reason to worry. Its you're training, you need to own it.

I was more curious on how I can proceed with him so I can stop getting chewed out. Everyday I assume this dude will send me home because I don’t do stuff the exact way he wants it.

unfortunately training is a very stressful time for both the trainee and trainer. I'm not familiar with their program but I doubt he has the authority to make the decision to send you home. He may tell the office he feels you're not a good fit but I doubt they'd base their decision on him. There are bad trainers at every company and the way the company fixes that is by trainees informing them what really happens in that truck.

And I firmly believe no trainer should sleep in the back while a trainee is driving, but he wants to know he can be in the sleeper while I drive and not worry.

you already have a CDL so you know enough how to handle the rig. If you're just driving straight theres really no reason for them to need to be next to you. Once you get on local roads and shipper/receivers that's a different story, they need to be up front with you. If you feel your trainer is failing you you really need to address it. Our member Victor is re-entering the industry after a previous attempt. He was dis satisfied with his training but didnt address it. He got out there on his own and lacked the confidence and didnt GOAL which resulted in him being terminated. Many of our members had terrible training experiences but they handled things professionally and informed the company of the issues going on. In most cases they were given additional training to help ensure they were indeed ready. If you've already addressed your concerns with the trainer in a calm, professional manner and nothing has changed maybe reach out to somebody in the office.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Hello

My son sounds like bit like you. He loves gaming, doesn't mind hard work and before becoming a truck driver, really never strayed to far from home. I do remember one day he was going to College in Hartford CT, and was headed home, NE Vermont. Well he didn't realize that he got started the wrong way until he saw signs for NYC. I continually bust his chops for that still. He didn't say his trainer was verbal like yours, but he didn't care of "the trainers way" of doing everything. My Son's trainer was a company driver, maybe yours is a lease op. I don't know. All I know, like many will tell you, training is a very small period of time in the grand scheme. I like you no quit attitude, just remember, he/she is there to train you how to drive, what to do, and what the company's expectations as a driver are. You will be done soon. Best of luck, and keep your eye on the prize.

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