Vent & Brag For The Week

Topic 27058 | Page 3

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Brag : took an extra shift today, 580 miles, 2 stores 2 backhaul that should be about 15 hours and pay about $450. Plus I should beat the incoming snow storm.

Vent : I'm starting to really F'ing hate Railroad Crossings!!!!!!!!!! I had slowed quite a bit to get a better look down the tracks given a previous incident, and the dang lights started flashing and the gate started coming down just as I cleared it. Always seem to have (or atleast notice more) negative when I'm working an extra day or doing a favor for dispatch. Half hour before this got a call about a store complaining about the way I put items in the coolers.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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doing a favor for dispatch

We all find certain job duties to be less desirable than others, and no one likes putting in a lot of time and effort for very little money. For instance, I didn't like doing local work when I arrived at a terminal. I didn't want to spend my time shuttling trailers around town. It was boring and tedious. I felt it was too much risk and grief for the money it paid. I wanted to run the open roads.

However, this is a huge opportunity for the driver. Doing the dirty work once in a while puts you in a strong position. By showing dispatch you're willing to do what it takes to help the company succeed and to make their job easier, they will be more willing to make sure you're happy and successful out there.

In fact, you can even save those favors for when you need them the most. For instance, it's great to say, "I know I only have 3 days of home time coming, but I've run quite a few local runs recently so I'd really appreciate it if you'd throw me a bone and give me an extra day next weekend."

Little alarm bells go off in my head when I notice people thinking about their job in a way that can lead to frustration and potentially a downward spiral. You and your dispatcher are a team. You work together, support each other, and help each other succeed. When you say, "Every time I help my dispatcher it causes me grief" you're adopting a mindset that will hurt that relationship. You're going to resist doing the dirty work, your dispatcher will stop taking great care of you, and things will spiral downward.

I get it, believe me, I do. Certain aspects of the job can be frustrating. But look for the opportunity in it. If you're making your dispatcher's life better, they'll make yours better in return. Do your job at a high level and you can expect them to do theirs at a high level. Be considerate and helpful and expect the same in return. In fact, be the first one to do a favor for the other. Pay it forward.

A driver that will do the dirty work is a rare and valuable driver. Be that kind of driver, and in return, you can expect those special favors that only the best drivers ever get. And there's nothing wrong with expecting better treatment for being a better driver. They should treat you based on how well you do your job. That's only fair.

Be awesome and expect awesome in return.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Little alarm bells go off in my head when I notice people thinking about their job in a way that can lead to frustration and potentially a downward spiral.

totally agree with everything you said, unfortunately many people feel its us vs them mentality. My comment about the negatives happen when I'm helping them was just a joke. That's not the case here, I love my job and do get special little favors by helping them. Our weeks are pretty consistent so I've started to notice what they typically need help with and if I'm coming back empty I'll give them a call and ask if they want me to do a pickup even if I wasnt scheduled to. There have been a few times I'll get a call asking if I want to work extra instead of going off seniority like usual, or like yesterday had a "short" 11 hour day so dispatch called and asked if I wanted to do something more as they know I'd love to hit 14 hours a day as we're only scheduled 4 days a week unless we pick up an extra route. When I turn my paperwork in at the end of the day I've also been asked if I want to take a vacation day for the following day due to too many drivers/not enough routes before sending out a text and going off seniority.

Is there an article about working as a team with your dispatcher? The points you brought up would be great for those entering the industry to see some of the perks they can get just by being flexible and a team player.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Sounds a bit like Railroad Crossing PTSD to me.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That's awesome to hear, Rob! Glad things are going so well for ya over there.

Is there an article about working as a team with your dispatcher? The points you brought up would be great for those entering the industry to see some of the perks they can get just by being flexible and a team player.

Yeah, we sure do. Here is a page from our truck driver's career guide that links to several good articles on working with dispatch and the other office personnel:

How to deal with dispatch, and get help on the road

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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