Prime PSD Take 2, December 20th. What To Bring? What To Expect?

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Jay G.'s Comment
member avatar

Howdy again everyone!

After being delayed from my initial start date due to a sleep apnea diagnosis, I am finally heading out to Salt Lake City for the Prime Student Driver program starting on December 20th. I just received the email from Prime with the Greyhound ticket information and invitation to orientation. I feel like its been a long time coming and the journey is only just beginning.

I know its been covered 100 different ways, and this just may be the OCD talking, but can someone give me a quick rundown on what to expect as well as a few key things to bring? I would definitely appreciate it!

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Good for you Jay.

I'll let the Primates comment on additional PSD expectations.

In the interim, here is a link to one of the better Prime Diaries: Icecold24K's Prime PSD & TNT Training Diary

Here is a link on what to bring: What to Bring To Prime Training

Safe Travels & Good luck Jay!

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Spaceman Spiff's Comment
member avatar

Yo Jay, glad to hear you're cleared for training.

I started in the salt lake terminal as well March 2019. Some things I can bullet point:

-Bring all your papers. Like the world war 2 German sentries, they want to see "ze papers." Everything on the email list, yes including the social security card.

-The passport isn't mandatory. TWIC will be a step you take between PSD and TNT if you don't get it prior to shipping out to salt lake.

-The motel is basic but it is free. Keep your focus on training not amenities.

-Get on the first shuttle on day 1. Ask the clerk at the motel check in what time the first shuttle is. There are Prime shuttles and a motel shuttle. All go to the same place. Once in a while, the last morning shuttle will be late tho.

-The morning priority every day is getting the lunch orders scheduled. Free.

-Pack as if you were going to be standing outside for three to four hours at time... Cause, you know, you will.

-If you expect any verification of any kind will be needed, be it medical or a job history entry, locate and save good phone numbers before you get there. Some folks spent three days making constant phone calls for a tiny issue that they just hadn't found a good number for contact on.

-Do laundry at the terminal. You still need quarters for our machines. 50 cents wash 50 cents dry.

-Friday is pizza day. Free.

-Don't get distracted on your first day on the pad. If you and your pack begin watching the week two students backing practice, the instructors will make you do push ups. No, but they will snap you back to focus on pre trip. It's all you should work on first two days.

-Some trainers come and scout potential trainees on the pad. You are being evaluated.

-The mechanics may be short with you. They are short with us too sometimes. They are busy. Don't take it personally, they are great teammates and will take care of you later on.

-Food trucks come to the parking lot. The schedule is taped on doors around the terminal.

-coffee is free. It's downstairs in the driver's lounge, right turn after you enter the building. Enjoy.

What specific things do you still want answers to?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

Good luck!

Not sure if you have prepped or already taken written tests for the CDL permit, but I was glad to have done that before heading to orientation. I just ran through the high road training on this site and aced the written tests once I got to Springfield.

It's a busy week, and lots of folks were having trouble studying for that while trying to get everything else completed.

Hope your experience on the dirty dog is better than mine was.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jay G.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Spaceman for your nput and information! I'll make sure to keep it close at hand as well as to be early and enjoy the ride! I'm not really sure there was much more other than getting some of those early jitters out of the way.

Matt, I already have my permit. The highroad program was definitely instrumental in helping pass it. I remember seeing others taking the test just sweating bullets.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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