Western Express Trucking Contract

Topic 28038 | Page 2

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PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

There is a really obvious way to get out of that contract. Write them a check! Pay up! That's what a contract is - it's an agreement. You agreed to it. If you have now decided there's a better way for you to proceed, then the contract allows you to do so.

Now, there's a much smarter way to go about this. You can fulfill your employment obligation and focus on learning how to be successful at this. Right now you are focusing on "how bad Western Express is." That's your first big blunder. You have fallen for the bait and feel the pain of the trap now. You have taken the common delusional approach to trucking of at least a million other wannabes. You think you are good, but your company is bad. That's so messed up and arrogant that I can't believe rookies fall for it so easily, but they do.

Get in there and make something happen. Be a man of your word. Be careful and prudent. Be productive. Be determined. Be a truck driver - God knows we need a few good ones about now.

double-quotes-end.png

Well you have some good words of advice for a fellow trucker, WOW

What did you want to hear, John?

Just Mitch's Comment
member avatar

In those 6 months how many loads have you declined? How often have you complained to them about everything? I ask because my first 6 months at Swift were all trials and tribulations. Companies aren’t dumb. They tend to start you in the kiddie pool before they toss you in the olympic pool with Michael Phelps. At Swift(insert big bad wolf emoji) I get 2000 miles pretty easily

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

John, here's what you asked us...

I would like to know if there is a way to get out of western express contract and move on?

I pretty much gave you the kind of straight shooting advice I'm well known for. I thought it was pretty straightforward and uncomplicated. That's how you get out of a contract - you do what you agreed to do. It's so simple a child can understand it.

It seems obvious you're wanting more though. So, let's dig a little deeper and see if we can help you finish what you started.

We don't have a lot to go on, but you added this little bit of information into the conversation...

I've been here 6 months and cant go over 2000 miles... I'm trying but no matter how much I run I always fall short

Okay, that doesn't sound good. We can all agree on that. Then you also stated this issue...

I also have to spend 4 to 6 weeks out and beg for home time

Ouch! That's not good either. I think there's some correlation between the issues you are having. Can you see it?

Maybe you don't. Mostly right now you are only seeing this...

I think western express is just an overall bad bad company

And a lot of this...

just false promises

Life sounds pretty grim over there at Western Express. That's too bad.

What if you went to another company and found it to be just as bad? Do you think you can just keep hopping from one company to another like a little tree frog trying to find just the right tree to call home?

I've got some suggestions and a few questions. It's really easy to cast aspersions when things don't go your way. Truck drivers are famous for that behavior, but it doesn't ever help them improve their situation. It only allows them to vent their frustrations while ignoring the solution.

Here's some questions for you to think about. I'd love to hear your answers to them, and we could offer a lot more advice if we knew some of this.

How much of your 70 hour clock are you using each week? Are you running out of time so that you need a 34 hour reset, or are you running on re-cap hours?

Are you maintaining a 100% on time record?

Are you providing your DM with accurate PTAs? (Projected Time of Availability) When do you get that information to them?

What is your typical form of communicating with your DM? Do you prefer talking to them on the phone, or are you using the macros set up in your tablet?

Do you contact your customers and set delivery expectations with them? Do you make attempts at getting them to take you early?

Have you had to turn down loads because you are out of hours?

Have you had to deliver late because of not having enough hours?

That's probably enough questions for now. Let's look at your concerns. I've got to say this - It's not meant to be unkind, but educational. If you haven't been able to turn over 2,000 miles a week in six months, Western Express hasn't made a single dime from you. Trust me on this - they want to see you doing much better.

All trucking companies have a full spectrum of drivers running at different levels of productivity. They have a core group who are crushing it every week. They have some others who are not as consistent, but are generally doing well enough to keep on the team with hopes of seeing improvement. And there's always a group that are there but nobody would be bothered if they suddenly decided to quit.

I've never advised any driver to depend on their company or their DM to provide them enough miles. That's not their job. They aren't some sort of benevolent dictator that's looking for a way to make sure every driver is treated fairly. The truth is that trucking is unfair. They don't give participation trophies just because we show up. They are looking for people who stand out. They are more like a High School football coach who plays the kids who can score.

How is your performance record looking? From what you've told us it's not too good. If you were the quarterback on a football team who kept throwing interceptions, would you have the gonads to blame your shortcomings on the coach? Would you understand why he kept the other quarterback in the game most of the time?

You can do much better at Western Express. I know that because I've done it. Moving on isn't what you need. Buckling down is more what I would recommend.

Show Me The Money!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

John T.'s Comment
member avatar

Poor you. Victim of another abusive mega.

But the guy you are sarcastically ripping on is arguably the most productive driver on this website. Guess what company he drove for when he started in the game...

You guys are something special no wonder this industry is like it is but is ok poor me like you said I've clearly now seen the truth here but poor me

John T.'s Comment
member avatar

In those 6 months how many loads have you declined? How often have you complained to them about everything? I ask because my first 6 months at Swift were all trials and tribulations. Companies aren’t dumb. They tend to start you in the kiddie pool before they toss you in the olympic pool with Michael Phelps. At Swift(insert big bad wolf emoji) I get 2000 miles pretty easily

Cant refuse loads as company driver and I don't complain spent first 2 months without going home and when I did go it was for a day and a half, supposed trainer only had 4 months driving and was already training and when he was driving was on his phone and falling asleep but that is probably my fault to but I didn't complain about that of course is my fault I feel you guys give to much credit to mega carriers but wait this site is just about that no really telling the truth

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John T.'s Comment
member avatar

John, here's what you asked us...

double-quotes-start.png

I would like to know if there is a way to get out of western express contract and move on?

double-quotes-end.png

I pretty much gave you the kind of straight shooting advice I'm well known for. I thought it was pretty straightforward and uncomplicated. That's how you get out of a contract - you do what you agreed to do. It's so simple a child can understand it.

It seems obvious you're wanting more though. So, let's dig a little deeper and see if we can help you finish what you started.

We don't have a lot to go on, but you added this little bit of information into the conversation...

double-quotes-start.png

I've been here 6 months and cant go over 2000 miles... I'm trying but no matter how much I run I always fall short

double-quotes-end.png

Okay, that doesn't sound good. We can all agree on that. Then you also stated this issue...

double-quotes-start.png

I also have to spend 4 to 6 weeks out and beg for home time

double-quotes-end.png

Ouch! That's not good either. I think there's some correlation between the issues you are having. Can you see it?

Maybe you don't. Mostly right now you are only seeing this...

double-quotes-start.png

I think western express is just an overall bad bad company

double-quotes-end.png

And a lot of this...

double-quotes-start.png

just false promises

double-quotes-end.png

Life sounds pretty grim over there at Western Express. That's too bad.

What if you went to another company and found it to be just as bad? Do you think you can just keep hopping from one company to another like a little tree frog trying to find just the right tree to call home?

I've got some suggestions and a few questions. It's really easy to cast aspersions when things don't go your way. Truck drivers are famous for that behavior, but it doesn't ever help them improve their situation. It only allows them to vent their frustrations while ignoring the solution.

Here's some questions for you to think about. I'd love to hear your answers to them, and we could offer a lot more advice if we knew some of this.

How much of your 70 hour clock are you using each week? Are you running out of time so that you need a 34 hour reset, or are you running on re-cap hours?

Are you maintaining a 100% on time record?

Are you providing your DM with accurate PTAs? (Projected Time of Availability) When do you get that information to them?

What is your typical form of communicating with your DM? Do you prefer talking to them on the phone, or are you using the macros set up in your tablet?

Do you contact your customers and set delivery expectations with them? Do you make attempts at getting them to take you early?

Have you had to turn down loads because you are out of hours?

Have you had to deliver late because of not having enough hours?

That's probably enough questions for now. Let's look at your concerns. I've got to say this - It's not meant to be unkind, but educational. If you haven't been able to turn over 2,000 miles a week in six months, Western Express hasn't made a single dime from you. Trust me on this - they want to see you doing much better.

All trucking companies have a full spectrum of drivers running at different levels of productivity. They have a core group who are crushing it every week. They have some others who are not as consistent, but are generally doing well enough to keep on the team with hopes of seeing improvement. And there's always a group that are there but nobody would be Well thank you for that you seem to have the same answer for anyone talking bad about a mega carrier and you are right is me not the company but I wonder why is there turnover rate is higher than others I wonder if you can actually tell me how to support my family on a 357 dollar check I wonder why are there 4 of us drivers here at Shaw in GA waiting since this morning like you said that enough questions for now but I've been here since 7:45 last night and cant get a load

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Poor you. Victim of another abusive mega.

But the guy you are sarcastically ripping on is arguably the most productive driver on this website. Guess what company he drove for when he started in the game...

double-quotes-end.png

You guys are something special no wonder this industry is like it is but is ok poor me like you said I've clearly now seen the truth here but poor me

We are the way we are because we try extremely hard to help others. Not everyone wants to be helped, though. This is frustrating for us sometimes, but we don’t quit. We can only keep trying to spread our gospel of the truth here on this site.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
you are right is me not the company but I wonder why is there turnover rate is higher than others I wonder if you can actually tell me how to support my family on a 357 dollar check I wonder why are there 4 of us drivers here at Shaw in GA waiting since this morning like you said that enough questions for now but I've been here since 7:45 last night and cant get a load

John, if you'd plug your pie hole for one minute and try to focus, you might learn something. Your only interest is to run your mouth and complain. I've been doing everything I can to try to lead you to the water, but you refuse to drink!

I have been there and done that. I was one of the people at Western Express who did very well. So yeah, I actually do know what I'm talking about. Everything you've bad to say was a complaint or an insult. It's no wonder you are having such a hard time if you are always that myopic.

Just Mitch's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

In those 6 months how many loads have you declined? How often have you complained to them about everything? I ask because my first 6 months at Swift were all trials and tribulations. Companies aren’t dumb. They tend to start you in the kiddie pool before they toss you in the olympic pool with Michael Phelps. At Swift(insert big bad wolf emoji) I get 2000 miles pretty easily

double-quotes-end.png

Cant refuse loads as company driver and I don't complain spent first 2 months without going home and when I did go it was for a day and a half, supposed trainer only had 4 months driving and was already training and when he was driving was on his phone and falling asleep but that is probably my fault to but I didn't complain about that of course is my fault I feel you guys give to much credit to mega carriers but wait this site is just about that no really telling the truth

You came to trucking...TRUTH. The truth is, in one thread you’ve managed to blame everyone from dispatch to your suddenly horrible trainer. If you look in the mirror I’m sure you’ll see who you left out.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Spaceman Spiff's Comment
member avatar

Finish your contract.

Just grind it down. Suffering outside the box of comfort a bit makes the time you live inside it that much more enjoyable.

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