First Solo Week. I Did NOT Anticipate The Amount Of Stress!

Topic 28175 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been stumbling my way through the last three months. I promise you it gets better. I don’t know when or how, but it does. Each day you learn a bit more and then presto, things that were a huge pain become second nature.

Hang in there. Keep a great attitude and ask a ton of questions. You’ll get there.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been stumbling my way through the last three months. I promise you it gets better. I don’t know when or how, but it does. Each day you learn a bit more and then presto, things that were a huge pain become second nature.

Hang in there. Keep a great attitude and ask a ton of questions. You’ll get there.

This is the truth. I've had lots of days when I wanted to quit and I don't drive everyday. But things get easier with time. As long as you don't quit and you learn from your mistakes you'll be great.

For example, I bet you'll never leave the terminal without your paperwork again. As you familiarize yourself with where you're going, you'll get better at navigating the roads.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

40 Days's Comment
member avatar

Not too distant memories for me this post hit home. The anxiety of a full truck stop and the stress of just trying to park and feel safe for 10hrs is brutal. Wrong turns and the embarrassment of mistakes coupled with a feeling of defeat. You are gonna win!!!

It gets a lot easier very soon. I hit rest areas for a few weeks after I did some silly stuff from the start. Trucker path is a valuable tool especially near big cities. Reserve it if arriving later in day your nerves will Thank you. Hard to justify from start not making much money but in the beginning I would rather be safe than eat.

GPS I have 2 and I learned after too many mishaps only listen to your gut and those thing aren't your bellybutton. Still to this day I have to look at them look at the road and say your both f***ing crazy I'm not doing that. I swear sometimes they route that way to see if it can be done not because they know.

In less than 2 months you will arrive at a truck stop with full confidence that any open spot could be yours. You will even get picky like what amenities does it have, is there flat parking, and be able to help the next batch of rookies get a spot and feel safe themselves. You will work hard prove yourself and be making big money and not care what the price of parking or much anything else costs. Until then be safe plan ahead and G.O.A.L a lot.

Guys leave the easy spots for the rookies if you can because someone will have more stress getting into that easy spot than you will blocked by a dumpster in the front backing between two long nose Pete's with your tandem set all the way forward and your tail swinging a mile both direction's.

Good luck and look forward to following you. Great post!

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Don's Comment
member avatar

As the weeks and months pass, you are going to gain more confidence and wonder what the big deal was. But, if you start getting ****y and think "I got this, no reason or need to ________________", then one way or another, you will get bit in the hiney . Always pay attention while driving, especially your speed as it can creep up on you if you are not paying attention, watch your mirrors and don't hurry while backing. Just try your best not to hit anything, whether it is moving or not). There are some places out there where you wonder "how am I going to get around that?". Your will be much less apt to hit anything if you "SLOW you roll" and watch your tandems , just like they taught us in Joplin. The trip planning, paperwork, learning to interact with receivers and consignees is confusing at first, but will all come together. It will just "click" on. When you make a mistake, own it but don't obsess over it. It's just part of gaining experience.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Hobo's Comment
member avatar

DFW is not truck friendly so if you made it there in your first week you'll be fine.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More