Congsingnee Refusing Nonfood Pallets What To Do?

Topic 28266 | Page 1

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Snakebite's Comment
member avatar

What would you do if a reciever refuses relatively expensive freight thats not damaged just a loading error from shipper? No mention of any protocols on bol.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Wild-Bill's Comment
member avatar

The only logical thing is to contact your dispatch/FM/DM or whatever your company calls it BEFORE you leave the cons. We have a team that specifically works on overage and shortage and damaged issues. As a company driver that decision would be “above my pay grade” and after many years of management I think I like it that way.

Let them work it out with customer service, the shipper and cons.

Let us know the results. I’d be curious to find out how it worked out.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Get the broker involved asap.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Snakebite's Comment
member avatar

Doesnt look good on my side of things the company i drive for doesnt have after hour staff to handle this case. Though they are aware of the issue. With no guidance from the company i drive for and the receiver having to close down shop and lock down gate they had me move off property. So i drove to the terminal not too far from here. Oh well ill let you know the repercussions.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

There will be no repercussions, it's out of your hands. You have no choice but to wait it out until you hear further from your company.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

This is a situation where the phrase, “I’m just the driver” is most applicable.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Yep, you had to leave and your company's os&d person will let you know what to do with it. When I've had similar partial load rejections, either I was told to dispose of it in a dumpster or give it away.. once was a bunch of gatorade I donated to a food bank, or take it to a terminal where they'll deal with disposition of the product. BTW when you signed those Bill's accepting the load, you signed it as a representative of your company.. while in transit, your company actually owns the freight your hauling. Lots of newer drivers dont realize that.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Snakebite's Comment
member avatar

Business as usual today missed a phone call from corporate didnt leave a message then i was dispatched. Though my dm was kinda upset because all he knew was i needed to stay at the reciever until further notice. I didnt give details on why i left nor did he ask. Pretty much at the beginning of the day it was all about picking up a load not so much about the freight left on the trailer... As far as im concerned i did my job, its between the shipper and corporate now.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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