Is Commercial Truck Driving A Civilian Career "really Hard To Beat"?

Topic 28521 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Moose Holland's Comment
member avatar

I'm short in the army at Fort Hood and I'm looking at the possibility of driving as a civilian when I get out. Many people in the service say that lifestyle is hard to beat considering the pay and the relatively little out-of-pocket living expenses. No rent, no electric bills, no doctors bills, no dental bills and three squares a day on top of a basic paycheck which is mostly money to squander away on a nice car, a new Harley-Davidson or whatever. Is driving a Big Rig for a "Big Wig" carrier really a lifestyle that's really tough to beat for a bachelor with no spouse or children when one considers what it potentially pays and how much sweat and knuckle-busting is involved in the employment? One also has to consider how tough the job market really is.

Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

I have a home, farm and kids so it would be tough to be gone for weeks at a time, at least for me. But for someone with no home ties that is good at following directions as far as be so a certain place by a certain time, then yea it is good. You will get to see a lot of areas of the country and maybe find an area to settle down in later. The money is good but you still have some expenses. If I did not have kids and other home expenses plus their insurance I would be able to save for all those toys you speak of. But it is a career and about any other career you can make that kind of money on also, as long as you stay away from the women, kids and home thing. Most eventually kinda like those things though. Good luck and give it a try.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum Moose. Thank you for your service sir!!

The trucking industry is one very complex animal. There are many different aspects of it. You find the aspect that fits you the best and you can make it a very rewarding career. Starting out we highly recommend getting your schooling through a big company. They provide great training and hire you on graduation. They are fast paced. Also it is very little money out of pocket up front.

If you like to travel being single you can hit the road and take your off time where ever you want as long as the company has freight going there. Your first year you can expect to make 35-45k. Afterward it can and will go up. This is a totally performance based industry.

Look around and read the threads. We have tons of info here.

Best wishes in your endeavours sir!!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Moose Holland's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the forum Moose. Thank you for your service sir!!

The trucking industry is one very complex animal. There are many different aspects of it. You find the aspect that fits you the best and you can make it a very rewarding career. Starting out we highly recommend getting your schooling through a big company. They provide great training and hire you on graduation. They are fast paced. Also it is very little money out of pocket up front.

If you like to travel being single you can hit the road and take your off time where ever you want as long as the company has freight going there. Your first year you can expect to make 35-45k. Afterward it can and will go up. This is a totally performance based industry.

Look around and read the threads. We have tons of info here.

Best wishes in your endeavours sir!!

Thank you, PJ. When I said that people say the lifestyle was hard to beat I should have mentioned that I was talking about the military lifestyle. I have the feeling that trucking might be hard to beat, all things considered, in the civilian job sector. No spouse and no kids is definitely a good thing for a travelling job.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Many of us are former military. We understand that lifestyle also. Being single and no kids can be a plus, just depends on the person. Me personally, I want time off the truck to just relax. I have a small place in the country that is very peaceful. Nothing better than sitting on the back porch with morning coffee listening to the birds sing and nothing but woods too look at.

When I’m at work, it’s all business. Run loads as long as I have hours, then take a couple days off at home. I have stayed out for 3-4 months at a time before, and did resets on the road. I got kinda grumpy.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

I'm short in the army at Fort Hood

LOL!! Short. Thanks for the memories!

0647037001595800102.jpg

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

I'm short in the army at Fort Hood

LOL!! Short. Thanks for the memories!

I've been out 32 years and still remember being "Short" before going PCS or when I separated.

Laura

Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

I know a young man at Fort Hood who is also considered it.

I'm short in the army at Fort Hood and I'm looking at the possibility of driving as a civilian when I get out. Many people in the service say that lifestyle is hard to beat considering the pay and the relatively little out-of-pocket living expenses. No rent, no electric bills, no doctors bills, no dental bills and three squares a day on top of a basic paycheck which is mostly money to squander away on a nice car, a new Harley-Davidson or whatever. Is driving a Big Rig for a "Big Wig" carrier really a lifestyle that's really tough to beat for a bachelor with no spouse or children when one considers what it potentially pays and how much sweat and knuckle-busting is involved in the employment? One also has to consider how tough the job market really is.

Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

32 years ago for me, as well.

Where does the time go.

double-quotes-start.png

I'm short in the army at Fort Hood

LOL!! Short. Thanks for the memories!

double-quotes-end.png

I've been out 32 years and still remember being "Short" before going PCS or when I separated.

Laura

Paul V.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah, when you'll leave the military, you'll see that the trucking business is actually easier! (I was a 0351 in the Marine Corps, I got a LOT less BS in my life when I EAS'd and started my trucking career... be careful of your eating habits though, it took me some time and 30 extra pounds to adapt my food intake to that new lifestyle without morning PT) By the way, I know it's a trucking forum, but if you can take advantage of the GI Bill, do it. If I'm not mistaken, you can use it at a trade school as well. I didn't, started working as soon as I had left my cammies, and am kinda regretting it now that I see other former Marine who went to college after their service and earn their lives better than I do.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More