Air Brake Test W/o Chocks?

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Godsgift's Comment
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just needed to get my CDL and start getting some type of income ASAP.

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I know NYC is different - they do some crazy stuff there, but you are awfully naive to think freshly printed CDL = income. Whatever gave you that idea?

You have zero experience.

You have zero training.

You aren't even sure how to do the in cab air test.

What is it you think you have to offer?

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What do I have to offer?

Just my services as a new driver I guess...

Of course I'll need training... no one is born a trucker right?

I know there's limitations in doing it this way...

But it's the route I felt made the most sense to me.

I plan on trying to start with Western Express.

I heard on this forum... (actually from you)... that they are willing to take on new CDLs without school.

Plan is to start and train with them... get some experience... and hopefully down the road I'll have more options.

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What's he's saying is that you're going to have a hard time getting hired. Many companies aren't able to hire self certified CDL holders for insurance reasons. New drivers with no experience either get company training or go to a school to get a certificate along with their license that says they received 160 hours of training.

If you plan on going with Western Express, I would reach out to them and see if they would be able to hire you with a license and no certificate.

Have you considered going with paid CDL training? Roehl and Prime are 2 companies that I can think of that pay you while you train and you're guaranteed a job upon completion of your training.

From the sounds of things, you're investing a lot in this test. If you're using Ferrari's school truck you're probably paying them about 500 to use their truck. I'll be honest with you, it sounds like you're not ready for this. A simple mistake on the brake test is an automatic fail and you're out of all that money for no reason. That's why I told you earlier, you're going about this all wrong.

Well, my dmv test is tomorrow...

So, there's really no going back at this point.

I filled out a short form application with Western. On it, I noted that I had no school.

A recruiter called me the next day... and I told him that I will be testing for the CDL soon.

He said to get back in touch after I get the CDA.

I also came across several people online who got on with Western without a certificate.

So, I guess I'll find out one way or the other in the weeks to come...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah you concern me too. You sound... rushed? It sounds like you just need some kind of income at this very moment and trucking is what the dice pointed to. Its a very stressful process. I wouldn't expect an income anytime soon and this isn't just a quick get out of debt card. Its literally a lifestyle change that takes months to get a foot off the floor and then you'll need to learn how to actually make money.

I would slow down and consider all your options because the route you want to go is actually the worst route to take. You're not going to pass your test without weeks of schooling/training and you're going to burn everything you have in savings just by renting trucks.

Go this route Paid CDL Training Programs

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

Yeah you concern me too. You sound... rushed? It sounds like you just need some kind of income at this very moment and trucking is what the dice pointed to. Its a very stressful process. I wouldn't expect an income anytime soon and this isn't just a quick get out of debt card. Its literally a lifestyle change that takes months to get a foot off the floor and then you'll need to learn how to actually make money.

I would slow down and consider all your options because the route you want to go is actually the worst route to take. You're not going to pass your test without weeks of schooling/training and you're going to burn everything you have in savings just by renting trucks.

Go this route Paid CDL Training Programs

Yea... well... guess i'll find out soon enough!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

From the sounds of things, you're investing a lot in this test. If you're using Ferrari's school truck you're probably paying them about 500 to use their truck. I'll be honest with you, it sounds like you're not ready for this. A simple mistake on the brake test is an automatic fail and you're out of all that money for no reason. That's why I told you earlier, you're going about this all wrong.

I've read over all his posts and.. He seems to have some idea that a CDL is get rich quick. Well, it aint. He thinks he does not have to get along with other people. Well, you do.

I'm gonna be blunt. This is not the career for you. It takes dedication to going to company sponsored schooled or local technical college. It takes being able to handle yourself in high stress situations. It takes being open to learning something new every day. It takes being able to get along with others because you and a trainer will be together in a tight confined space (sleeper cab) for weeks.

Hah... ok.. well, guess you're entitled to your opinion.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I know there's limitations in doing it this way...

But it's the route I felt made the most sense to me.

I plan on trying to start with Western Express.

I heard on this forum... (actually from you)... that they are willing to take on new CDLs without school.

Plan is to start and train with them... get some experience... and hopefully down the road I'll have more options.

Okay, so there's all kinds of opportunities out here, including companies willing to pay you $700 - $800 per week to train with them, but you determined that limiting yourself to one company is "the route I felt made the most sense to me."

Sounds like a plan! Not a very solid one, but you've got confidence in it. How are you going to react when they ask you to sign their "non compete" contract, binding you to them for one year?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes that is correct. Its done this way because it leaves one half the brakes applied and allows you to see which side may be having an issue. Doing whole system at once is fine but if there is an issue , you then need to do each part separately anyways to know where to begin looking for leaks.

Sorry... I'm a complete noob... so I wasn't following....

Had to go back and re-read what you were saying...

You mean that one of my spring brake valves can be pulled out during the air brake tests?

The videos I've been studying with online always had both valves pushed in and used chocks during the test... so I'm not really sure.

I haven't gone to formal school, and this is the first time hearing anything about doing them separately with a 2psi/min or anything like that...

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Ok, well I'll preface this by saying I've never tested in NY. But I was a CDL instructor, and my students tested in PA. We did in fact use chocks while testing in an automatic because our cascadia's will still roll, even when in drive with the engine turned off. If there's a way to keep it from rolling, I can't figure it out.

I just tested this in the new cascadia I drive now. No matter which key position, brake on/off combination, etc., the truck will still roll in drive or 1st with the engine off. So I can only assume you will be testing on level ground, hence the reason for no chocks.

For the static test, you will not be testing the tractor and trailer individually, so forget that.

The exact order in which we did things in PA was:

1- Truck chocked and running/valves in to fill air tanks during in-cab inspection (lights, horn, etc.)

2- Shut truck off.

3- Static test of combo (>4psi in 1min)

4- Fan brakes till warning light & buzzer come on.

5- Continue fanning till valves pop

6-Restart truck to re-build pressure. Remove chocks while air is building.

7- Tug tests

8- Roll 5mph and test service brake.

9- Set brakes and done

As long as you're on level ground, you'll be fine without chocks. Find out from your instructor the exact order in which they will be testing in NY. You may in fact do the tug tests and 5 mph roll prior to the air-brake portion. That's how I did it when I tested in MO.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar
That's how I did it when I tested in MO.

But that was in a manual.

Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

in Wisconsin Florida and Georgia they test one at a time.........

For the static test, you will not be testing the tractor and trailer individually, so forget that.

Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

In Wisconsin Florida and Georgia they test one at a time.........

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That's how I did it when I tested in MO.

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But that was in a manual.

For the static test, you will not be testing the tractor and trailer individually, so forget that.

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