McElroy Truck Lines

Topic 2878 | Page 28

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Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

I have a question for anyone currently working there. I am starting cdl school next month with the Troops into transportation program out of fort Benning and will be living close to Phenix city Alabama. I would like to try my hat at flatbed and would prefer to stay regional .

How is the flatbed freight going with McElroy these days? How often do you end up setting and waiting on loads? (Flatbed freight in general, doesn’t have to be McElroy). I’m not concerned about their cpm but are they providing for your needs?

How is the equipment? I’m not concerned too much about automatic vs manual but are there apus? If not what is the idling policy?

How was your trainer? Experienced? helpful? Do they allow trainers with less than 2 yrs experience? (I will be a straight up rookie , would prefer to not be trained by another rookie).

I truly hope this doesn’t sound like a laundry list, these are just some of the questions that matter to me , and I understand that individual experiences may vary. Thanks in advance guys! I have been creeping this site for awhile and now that my retirement is here it’s time for me to die diligence!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

USMC AAV's Comment
member avatar

Hey Papa Pig,

Ok, so first off, I dont work for McElroy but I know a bunch of guys that do, and if you read this thread from page one you will find out every question you asked probably several times over. That being said, the guys I know that work for McElroy all say they like it and I rarely see them ****ed off cause the company has done them wrong. There are quite a few McElroy truckers on here who can fill you in on all the details that makes McElroy a great company to work for. If you are looking to get into Flat-bedding this is one company that I would recommend cause their school, and flatbed program is top notch and their trainers I have met on the road all seem to really know there stuff.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

USMC AAV thanks. I have read the thread. And it’s one of the reasons McElroy is on my radar. That being said most of the posts are a year or 2 old. I was just looking to see if there were any current drivers. And how things were working out with them, etc. it’s been a great thread!

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Does anyone know if there would be more of a variety of loads between McElroy and other flatbed companies? I think I saw someone say earlier in the thread that they didn’t haul steel.

Personally while starting out I would like to try and haul everything and not be limited with loads.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I would think that when you are first starting, the more important subject is learning how to drive, more than worrying about what the load consists of.

One step at a time...

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

I would think that when you are first starting, the more important subject is learning how to drive, more than worrying about what the load consists of.

One step at a time...

Thanks for the input .I see what you are saying and I agree to an extent. I’m a rook and don’t know what I don’t know. My first concern is which will hire me. Could get offers from both or neither 🤷🏻‍♂️

Followed by learning to drive. But after that , I would like to learn as much as I can about the flatbed side of the industry. And call me crazy but I kinda like a challenge lol

Both are proven and successful companies and I would consider myself lucky to be hired by either. But just in case I get an opportunity between the two it would be cool to know little differences that each has to offer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

PackRat suggests...

I would think that when you are first starting, the more important subject is learning how to drive, more than worrying about what the load consists of.

One step at a time...

This is very much a one-step-at-a-time process. It's advisable to focus 100% of your attention on the very next step you need to conquer and master, and not look past it. I understand, having been in your shoes many years ago...it's easy to get ahead of yourself and look into the future.

Good luck!

Nooga Joe's Comment
member avatar

I have a question for anyone currently working there. I am starting cdl school next month with the Troops into transportation program out of fort Benning and will be living close to Phenix city Alabama. I would like to try my hat at flatbed and would prefer to stay regional .

How is the flatbed freight going with McElroy these days? How often do you end up setting and waiting on loads? (Flatbed freight in general, doesn’t have to be McElroy). I’m not concerned about their cpm but are they providing for your needs?

How is the equipment? I’m not concerned too much about automatic vs manual but are there apus? If not what is the idling policy?

How was your trainer? Experienced? helpful? Do they allow trainers with less than 2 yrs experience? (I will be a straight up rookie , would prefer to not be trained by another rookie).

I truly hope this doesn’t sound like a laundry list, these are just some of the questions that matter to me , and I understand that individual experiences may vary. Thanks in advance guys! I have been creeping this site for awhile and now that my retirement is here it’s time for me to die diligence!

This time of year freight is always slow with flatbed. I see a lot of empty flatbeds sitting around, not only from McElroy (who I drive for) but many other companies also. Until today I haven’t had to sit and wait for a load in about 2 months, although I do know other drivers who have to wait often. But if you bust ass, they aren’t going to leave you sitting...the drivers that do usually end up having the best luck with loads. My pay and miles have been excellent And I have not made the quoted CPM once due to load minimums, tarp pay, etc. I usually average 60-65 CPM (bit this WILL vary.) As far as the equipment...we have 2017-2020 International and 2015-2017 Freightliner trucks. The Freightshakers are currently in the process of being phased out. ‘17-‘18 trucks are almost all 10-speed and all ‘19-20 trucks are auto with the exception of the trainer trucks. All Freightliners are 10-speed. They do an excellent job of taking care of and maintaining the trucks. Anytime I’ve had a problem I’ve been sent to a terminal as soon as possible (depending on the severity of the problem.) There are no APU’s but trucks are clean idle certified and we are allowed to idle anytime we are in the truck. Yes, we do have trainers with less than 2 years experience, but they aren’t just drivers who have applied for it...trainers, fleet managers or other management have to basically nominate you as a trainer, so we don’t end up with just anyone training people. As with any company you’ll have great trainers, good trainers, and bad trainers. From what I’ve seen, the bad ones aren’t with the company long. My trainer had 15 years experience, 14 of it with McElroy. He was, and still is, awesome. Even after you are on your own you are encouraged to keep in contact with your trainer weekly...if mine doesn’t hear from me for a couple of days he’ll call me (and I’ve been solo since early April.) Overall, the company has been fair, respectful, and has treated me like a person and not a number. Every promise made to me by the recruiter has been delivered and then some. If you have anymore questions feel free to ask!

Joe

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Jay F.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I have a question for anyone currently working there. I am starting cdl school next month with the Troops into transportation program out of fort Benning and will be living close to Phenix city Alabama. I would like to try my hat at flatbed and would prefer to stay regional .

How is the flatbed freight going with McElroy these days? How often do you end up setting and waiting on loads? (Flatbed freight in general, doesn’t have to be McElroy). I’m not concerned about their cpm but are they providing for your needs?

How is the equipment? I’m not concerned too much about automatic vs manual but are there apus? If not what is the idling policy?

How was your trainer? Experienced? helpful? Do they allow trainers with less than 2 yrs experience? (I will be a straight up rookie , would prefer to not be trained by another rookie).

I truly hope this doesn’t sound like a laundry list, these are just some of the questions that matter to me , and I understand that individual experiences may vary. Thanks in advance guys! I have been creeping this site for awhile and now that my retirement is here it’s time for me to die diligence!

double-quotes-end.png

This time of year freight is always slow with flatbed. I see a lot of empty flatbeds sitting around, not only from McElroy (who I drive for) but many other companies also. Until today I haven’t had to sit and wait for a load in about 2 months, although I do know other drivers who have to wait often. But if you bust ass, they aren’t going to leave you sitting...the drivers that do usually end up having the best luck with loads. My pay and miles have been excellent And I have not made the quoted CPM once due to load minimums, tarp pay, etc. I usually average 60-65 CPM (bit this WILL vary.) As far as the equipment...we have 2017-2020 International and 2015-2017 Freightliner trucks. The Freightshakers are currently in the process of being phased out. ‘17-‘18 trucks are almost all 10-speed and all ‘19-20 trucks are auto with the exception of the trainer trucks. All Freightliners are 10-speed. They do an excellent job of taking care of and maintaining the trucks. Anytime I’ve had a problem I’ve been sent to a terminal as soon as possible (depending on the severity of the problem.) There are no APU’s but trucks are clean idle certified and we are allowed to idle anytime we are in the truck. Yes, we do have trainers with less than 2 years experience, but they aren’t just drivers who have applied for it...trainers, fleet managers or other management have to basically nominate you as a trainer, so we don’t end up with just anyone training people. As with any company you’ll have great trainers, good trainers, and bad trainers. From what I’ve seen, the bad ones aren’t with the company long. My trainer had 15 years experience, 14 of it with McElroy. He was, and still is, awesome. Even after you are on your own you are encouraged to keep in contact with your trainer weekly...if mine doesn’t hear from me for a couple of days he’ll call me (and I’ve been solo since early April.) Overall, the company has been fair, respectful, and has treated me like a person and not a number. Every promise made to me by the recruiter has been delivered and then some. If you have anymore questions feel free to ask!

Joe

Awesome post. Confirms everything I read and heard. Sounds like a great company. They were high on my list but my recruiter was very hard to get in touch with. Once I got the job with TMC she was calling everyday lol. When I see their trucks they always look very nice. Love the bright red!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Papa Pig's Comment
member avatar

Overall, the company has been fair, respectful, and has treated me like a person and not a number. Every promise made to me by the recruiter has been delivered and then some. If you have anymore questions feel free to ask!

Joe

Thanks joe I appreciate the input.

I am pretty heavily tattooed. Do they tend to have a problem with that? I know they want you to wear a nice shirt which is no problem for me. Do they have you hauling a variety of stuff or mostly hardware store loads?

What area are you out of? I am in eastern Alabama. Smiths station , between Opelika and Phenix city.

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