Finding A New Job With A Preventable Accidents On My Record

Topic 28803 | Page 3

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Dwight's Comment
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I think this is a troll post. It's beyond absurd.

Michelle E.'s Comment
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First ever post here. Love this site.

I'm studying to get my FL CDL permit. So I'm not experienced in big TRUCK driving. A couple of things grabbed my attention. Firstly, he had a serpentine belt break and his Qualcomm was not working. What?!? You are taught to do your Pre-Trip and Post trip inspections for a reason.

Normally, you are to observe your engine compartment components and belts, that they are not damaged, no abrasions, bumps, cuts or frayed and no more than 3/4 of an inch of play when you push on it. A serpentine belt should have shown some type of wear or damage (tell tale squeaking) before breaking on you. On a personal note, I had my serpentine belt on a Chevy Blazer break and the vehicle quickly climbed to high temp due to the belt not driving the water pump which in turn pumps coolant and water through the system. it can lead to a sudden loss of "power assist" for the steering system. In fact, if a serpentine belt breaks, the steering wheel becomes incredibly hard to turn. I was able to control the vehicle. I did not hit a guardrail, You shouldn't have either. Moving on....

NOW.....I'm not sure of your former driver status but I'm guessing SWIFT would have to be ELD compliant.

Most Trucks have a Qualcomm system. Were you aware it was not working? After all, this is only your ELD. I wonder if the DOT would be so accommodating when you mention your Qualcomm is not working? My guess would be, not really. I would have directly contacted my Fleet Manager/Home Campus of any discrepancies with my Qualcomm. These phone numbers would be stored in my cell phone and in my file box. No excuse not to call...using my best ET impersonation. "Know how to phone home" (company home)

Hopefully, this does not offend anyone I was giving my honest thoughts on the matter.

Michelle

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob T.'s Comment
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Hopefully, this does not offend anyone I was giving my honest thoughts on the matter.

I wouldn't worry about that as long as you do it in a respectful way. It's a far too often occurrence someone will come in here with an elaborate story of how something happened but leave out important details or fabricate certain parts. What they don't realize is the advice we're giving for their particular situation becomes worthless because we advise someone based on what we're told.

We all make mistakes and many of us share our goof ups to help others learn from them. If you're not willing to admit when you're wrong and find ways to avoid repeating it you're going to have a rough go.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dwight's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hopefully, this does not offend anyone I was giving my honest thoughts on the matter.

double-quotes-end.png

I wouldn't worry about that as long as you do it in a respectful way. It's a far too often occurrence someone will come in here with an elaborate story of how something happened but leave out important details or fabricate certain parts. What they don't realize is the advice we're giving for their particular situation becomes worthless because we advise someone based on what we're told.

We all make mistakes and many of us share our goof ups to help others learn from them. If you're not willing to admit when you're wrong and find ways to avoid repeating it you're going to have a rough go.

Up-vote for Rob T.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
BardTale's Comment
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I may be able to shed some light on this. Earlier this year, I had a coolant leak on my truck. (Turns out a hose developed a leak in it). While mine was gradual, when the truck detected the low coolant, it threw up warning lights on the dash for "imminent engine shut down". Which means I had a very short time period to pull off the road before the truck shut down to protect the engine.

This is just theorycrafting of course, it could of been possible that the truck, detecting the sudden drop in coolant level when the belt broke (The gentleman said that the container was melted?), it could of hit the container to such a degree to crack it causing it to spill out it's liquid. The truck detecting the sudden low level could of given the sudden solid red and flashing yellow engine warning lights. The OP being a new driver probably started panicking and started to look for a place to pull over, but was unable to at that point. In the search for a safe please, the truck could of shut down while the vehicle was still moving and he lost all the power to the steering.

So, based on my own past experiences, this is not an impossible situation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
EricGuvNC's Comment
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Ladies and Gentlemen (Old School formatting),

Qualcomm has been well known to become dysfunctional for any or no reason regardless of "signal strength". I've experienced such actions, over a 20 year period Nationwide in different Class A Sleeper Trucks. (I've also been a Class A & B Truck Mechanic within the "20 year Period" and had NEVER SEEN or HEARD of such calamity.) >>(not to say it doesn't happen, just that I've never seen or heard of it)<<

Serpentine Belts, of what I've learned, can last from 50,000 - 100,000 miles, however your mileage will vary. Some Brands of Belts will not even last 50,000 miles. I'm surprised to read about a Serpentine Belt terminating O. T. R. at such a Large and Well Established Company, yet things happen. (Could have been from faulty Pre-Trip Inspection/s).

As to Steering: "Yes, Steering is incredibly difficult without power assist, yet still can be done without Popeye Arms. Results vary depending upon terrain, weather and Initiative".

Brakes still work regardless of Engine Performance ****il Air Capacity drains to Brake Lock), so use of Brakes would have possibly eliminated your

"being forced to hit a/the guardrail".

As to "not being able to contact company on a Cell Phone", well, that's just weird UNLESS your service was terminated due to something OR possibly in a weird area that didn't offer much connectivity. At such point after vehicle motionless and 4 ways initiated, walking 1/2 to 1 mile from Vehicle might have assisted connectivity (unless service terminated). I'm curious as to how long was the Driver O.T.R. with a Trainer?? The least I've heard was 2 weeks (Many Companies). The most, 3 months ( A Refrigerated Company on I-30, just North of Texarkana).

The Coolant/Overflow Tank does NOT appear (per the only Picture) to "be melted", otherwise the coolant would not still be seen IN the Compartments. There "appears" to possibly be some Coolant just below and to the front of the Reservoir however a "1 picture Diagnosis" is not adequate.

In the future Young Driver, TAKE MULTIPLE PICTURES of Both Sides as well Top AND Bottom! Same for ACCIDENTS (like the one you incurred).

Thanks Everyone!! CHEERS!!

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
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