Differences Between Dry Van And Reefer

Topic 29650 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

I spent a long while on the phone yesterday with Lisa Wilson from Wilson Logistics yesterday. Between her 5 year old and my dogs, it was quite a circus lol But to make a long story short, I am very interested in this company. It may even beat Pride at this point...but she is really pushing me to drive Western Regional hauling dry van. Most of the research I have been doing was for reefer. I know there is a pay differential, but after training they pay 46 cpm for dry van , so it sounds to me like the pay is similar.

The pros for this company for me is training in Missoula (I used to live there, I know my way around lol), home on the average of every 2 weeks (driving regional), I could take 2 of my pets after being solo for 60 days (no size limit), reasonable training period for someone who doesn't know squat about trucking (3ish months), APUs and inverters already on the trucks, driving mostly in parts of the country I have traveled extensively in a 4 wheeler, in house CDL school with a 1 year contract. If you don't make the year, you pay them $3500. If you make it 6 months you pay half of that. Private school here runs from 5k to 8k depending on which school you go to.

The cons are they are traveling mostly in parts of the country I've been to. (I have been in 28 states and would like to hit the others before I die, but most are in the NE and not sure I ever want to drive a truck there lol) They do have an OTR fleet that runs reefers, but she just kept saying I think you'd be happier doing regional, but you could change after you are hired...so there's that. She also said that if I transferred over to OTR that getting back to regional would probably not be an issue if I wanted to be home more. The other thing was when I asked about unloading she said that 90% of their freight was "no touch". Does that mean I'd need to unload (or pay lumpers) for 1 out of every ten trips on average? Do the receivers or trucking companies supply pallet jacks then? I honestly don't know what that means lol

So from a driver's perspective, what are the differences between dry van and reefer? And what does 90% no touch mean?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

She's telling you about being happy doing regional because she is trying to fill some voids (empty seats) for regional.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

She's telling you about being happy doing regional because she is trying to fill some voids (empty seats) for regional.

yeah I figured that. And it does have it's positives. And it's negatives like everything else. This may sound bad, but I wish I was desperate for a job, or had a spotty work history or something that would limit my choices...it would make it much simpler lol

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Don't worry about the starting pay, or the CPM right now. The more efficient you are, the more you will make. I would not overthink this. Drivers switch fleets within companies all the time. From what I've seen and experienced, it's not difficult. Drivers want to see the country? OTR. Get tired of that want to be home weekly? REGIONAL. Need to be home nightly? LOCAL.

Lumpers generally unload the freight for many grocery-store loads. The company always pays for this; never the driver.

I think you should stick with your Pride Pick. Either way, both companies are solid.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

Don't worry about the starting pay, or the CPM right now. The more efficient you are, the more you will make. I would not overthink this. Drivers switch fleets within companies all the time. From what I've seen and experienced, it's not difficult. Drivers want to see the country? OTR. Get tired of that want to be home weekly? REGIONAL. Need to be home nightly? LOCAL.

Lumpers generally unload the freight for many grocery-store loads. The company always pays for this; never the driver.

I think you should stick with your Pride Pick. Either way, both companies are solid.

Thanks Packrat. The only REAL plus for Wilson is the savings on the schooling. After putting down the pros and cons of both, I think Pride probably still wins.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

When I did dry van , it was mostly daytime and Mon - Sat morning loading/unloading. Reefer seems to only be 1800 - 0400 7 days a week. I'm a night person, so that doesn't bother me.

Due to the size of the companies I drive/drove for, my loads are live load/unload. The only drop and hook I ever did was running cans (containers) to the Port of Oakland. I have never touched freight...in fact, most shippers and receivers don't want you in the warehouse (pre Chinese Virus even).

Don't get hung up on any one company....something may come up and they won't take you...then you would be disappointed.

Laura

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

The closest I've been to "touching freight" has been actually unloading three large filing cabinets with a pallet jack (I was paid an accessory pay of $25 each). Another example I recall involved hooking a chain to individual frame containers to pull these to the rear of the trailer with a forklift at a consignee. So, just under "100% No-Touch Freight."

The biggest labor that occurs occasionally is installing cargo straps, sweeping a trailer clean (I use a battery operated blower), or pulling nails from the floor decking. I have never had to wash out the inside of a trailer before or after a shipment as many refer trailer loads require.

About 60% of my trips are pre-loaded trailers at the shipper , then drop these at the reciever. Maybe 10% are what is called a "live load or live unload" on both ends. Many of my loads do not have a specific appointment time window. Sometimes my window can be as much as 48 hours. The longest I've ever been at a customer was 15 hours in the dock getting loaded. Most companies will pay the driver some detention hourly pay for delays. It's not as much as driving for an hour, but it's better than nothing.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Scratch2win's Comment
member avatar

For me refer sucked pharmaceuticals are different then food though. Lots of sitting to load/unload loging temps as you are driving which I feel is dangerous. Lots of paperwork to be done. I'm really happy to be back on dryvan.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Road Weary Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Hey Vicki, Are you talking about the Western 11 or is there another Region called Western ? Just curious because I am currently considering Wilson and my recruiter is guiding me towards Western 11 with school in Montana.

Vicki M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Vicki, Are you talking about the Western 11 or is there another Region called Western ? Just curious because I am currently considering Wilson and my recruiter is guiding me towards Western 11 with school in Montana.

The Western 11. The "Western" is the I5 corridor and is only available to folks who live in WA, OR and I think CA. If I go with them, I'd be doing the Western 11. Talked to Lisa again today, talked about loading and unloading trucks (no touch to them does NOT mean anything about unloading lol You might have to count some boxes or stuff like that. I am fine as long as I don't have to unload EVERY time. I kinda figured that is what it meant, I am sure the warehouses/receivers don't want you hurting yourself on their property or anything. After spending hours scrolling through their FB page, I have discovered that almost ALL of the students from them go regional first. After you get a little time you can go OTR. If you don't get your CDL through their company school, you have to have 6 mos experience for regional and 1 year for OT. They seem to be growing quickly and recently, so that's a good sign to me that they have business...They sent me a letter of employment (or whatever it's called, conditional on my background checks etc...so we will see where it goes.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More