Hooking Doubles At An Angle

Topic 29764 | Page 1

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Victoria's Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone, Rookie driver here. I pull doubles and unfortunately some terminals I go to don’t have enough room to hook up in the spots that my trailers are dropped in. My trainer insists I learn how to 45 angle back and hook my set that way but I’ve been adamant about pulling my trailers out and hooking somewhere that I will have more space. Anyone experience this themselves and can provide some insight? I feel like I spend a lot more time trying to desperately hook up at an angle instead of just pulling my trailers out but my trainer thinks moving to a more open area is an even more waste of time.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I haven't worked with doubles , but occasionally I've backed under a 53 footer at an angle. It's definitely not recommended because there's the danger of pushing the trailer over. At least that's what I've been told.

The angle part isn't the question, that's want the fifth wheel is all about. But I believe the real problem is in pushing the trailer sideways. If you pay attention to that itself, it should not be a problem. Have you watched other drivers do it?

I can't give you any pointers, but consider that others do it and your trainer, who hopefully know what they're talking about, "insists". Sometimes it's just a matter of doing it for the first time, then you break through that "wall".

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I almost exclusively hook doubles at an angle. The only time I don't do it is if there's somebody hooked up next to the trailer I'm backing into. The reason I do it is because it makes it easier for me to line up to the tires and I can see exactly where my trailer is going. Sometimes I have older trailers with walls that are pushed out so I can't see anything. Other times, I just don't have the space to straight back and it would take to long to make the necessary corrections to get straight with my tail.

Your dolly doesn't have to be at an angle, it can be straight. When you connect the pintle eye and hook, just make sure your steers are straight and everything is lined up and it'll hook. Before backing, I look go under my rear trailer and make sure the kingpin and the fifth wheel are lined up correctly. Then just back up until it hooks and do a tug test to make sure. Then jump out to take a look.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Small world, I'm 99.9999% sure we are out of the same terminal , I don't want to give away to much information on here but you where in the office before right?

Both your trainer and Mr. Banks are correct it is easier and faster (usually) to hook at a angle than it is to move trailers to where you can hook them. Personally, I did the exact same thing you are, it is frustrating to get it right but after time it will come.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Victoria's Comment
member avatar

That’s crazy lol! May I ask who this is? And yes I am lol that’s so funny. I’m trying my best to get this angle backing down but I’m having such a hard time doing it in St Louis. Have you been there before?

Small world, I'm 99.9999% sure we are out of the same terminal , I don't want to give away to much information on here but you where in the office before right?

Both your trainer and Mr. Banks are correct it is easier and faster (usually) to hook at a angle than it is to move trailers to where you can hook them. Personally, I did the exact same thing you are, it is frustrating to get it right but after time it will come.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Robert C I have that 9:45 pm Remington meet, I have been to Saint Louis and had the same problems when I first started I moved the trailers to the spots where I could hook straight.

Trust me you'll get it, I saw you hooking empties ( back when we had some) one day it looked like you knew what where doing.

Like Banks said above I tend to hook with the cab on a angle most of the time because it makes it easier to see, once you figure it out you will be surprised just how angled you can be and still get it too hook.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I have some horror stories.... I'm convinced that if I can get to where I am today, anybody can. When I first started, I had days where it would take me 2 hours (no exaggeration) to hook a set. Now, I'm hooked up in 10 minutes or less. I was so bad, that dispatchers were reaching out to my driver development instructor to see if I needed more training. I missed every gate and I was always late.

Take your time and be safe. The rest will come with experience.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Victoria's Comment
member avatar

I’m so happy to be talking to you right now. I really appreciate this. I’m trying to get the hang of it but I feel like once I hook the dolly up to my lead it moves wayyy too fast to the point of no return and I just mess my whole set-up up. I’ll have to start backing up my lead closer to the dolly to avoid pulling it out too far until I can learn how to maneuver a trailer with a dolly hooked up to it.

You’re funny lol we have empties now! I heard you were interested in training, have they talked to you about that or have you applied? I just looked through some of your previous comments on posts and you have some very helpful advice.

Robert C I have that 9:45 pm Remington meet, I have been to Saint Louis and had the same problems when I first started I moved the trailers to the spots where I could hook straight.

Trust me you'll get it, I saw you hooking empties ( back when we had some) one day it looked like you knew what where doing.

Like Banks said above I tend to hook with the cab on a angle most of the time because it makes it easier to see, once you figure it out you will be surprised just how angled you can be and still get it too hook.

Victoria's Comment
member avatar

Thank you so much! I needed the boost. I always think I’m the only one doing bad so I really appreciate the reality of things. I know the first year is the hardest so I just gotta ride it out and keep learning.

I have some horror stories.... I'm convinced that if I can get to where I am today, anybody can. When I first started, I had days where it would take me 2 hours (no exaggeration) to hook a set. Now, I'm hooked up in 10 minutes or less. I was so bad, that dispatchers were reaching out to my driver development instructor to see if I needed more training. I missed every gate and I was always late.

Take your time and be safe. The rest will come with experience.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

After 3.5 years still cant back up a trailer and dolly it always goes sideways on me, if you are not careful it will break the dolly off the pintle hook.

I told them I would train before Xmas and have mentioned a few times to Ops and dispatcher all I ever hear is we are waiting on safety and will let you know.

My first few months where pretty bad as well, it was taking me forever to hook I would move trailers so I could get to them often, I thought about quitting but decided to stick it out until they fire me, now I can pretty much hook a set anyplace, although there are still times it is easier and safter to move a trailer,

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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