Weekly Mileage Pay.’

Topic 30263 | Page 1

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Crownified's Comment
member avatar

I was reading old schools post on mediocrity reaps no rewards. First of all I completely agree with that. I was under the impression that receiving a $1000 paycheck weekly (after taxes) was close to the high end of weekly mileage pay. He said he has since doubled that if I read it correctly. I am not arguing the validity of that statement. I am more asking how it is possible to get a $2000 weekly check on a pay by mile basis? With regulated trucks running 65 or less it is hard to average 3000-3500 miles weekly even if you are willing and a hard worker. HOS prevents going much higher that that as you will be empty on your 70. Like I said I totally do not mean to argue. I would just like to know how to make that kind of money as a company driver getting paid by mile as the at is definitely a goal all of us should be striving for.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Really? I run exclusively recaps and can easily do 400 miles every day in 8 hours.

7 X 400 = 2800 miles.

Most days I can use 9 hours for On Duty and Driving and get 450 easily.

7 X 450 = 3150 miles

If I know the truck is scheduled for upcoming maintenance, I can really run and use the clock up in less than 7 days.

7 X 550 = 3850 miles

If I were doing resets every week, I could easily run up well over 4000 miles per week.

Incidentally, I drive at 62 MPH about 95% of the time, too.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I just took home $1400+ this week. I try to average $1000 or more net each week. I need to gross at least $1300 to do that.

At my current CPM , I need to make 2654 miles to do that. Most weeks that's not a problem. I also like to run recaps and rarely have to take a 34.

The faster a new driver learns to back, manage their clock and learn their company's messaging system, the more they can earn. All I just mentioned are some key things that hurt a new driver's pay. Also, with most companies you start at lower pay and get raises during or after one year.

Here is my thread on my first year pay.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Crownified's Comment
member avatar

Thank you. Both of these replies make sense. With time spent at shipper/receiver I can see 3k Miles even a little more as weeks may not always be consistent based on freight availability in the location your at. With that gross net pay ranging from $1000-1300 seams feasible. As long as the you are managing your clock and all that.

Basically what I’m getting at is that is good average pay and absolutely nothing to complain about. Actually I think that’s good money for anyone starting out in any industry. My question was how to double that? I’m guessing that’s an experience and years of proving yourself a reliable safe driver that allows you to get the cpm pay that allows you to reach that 2k per weak goal.

I love this website because it’s honest information and does not put down company drivers or try to push people to lease. With all that “inflated” information of lease pay out there and unrealistic monetary expectations surrounding lease it is good to see that it is possible to make that kind of money as a company driver.

Thank you all for the information.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Crownified, and welcome to our forum!

I am able to average a little more than 3,000 miles per week. That is because of a strong relationship with my dispatcher based on trust and confidence. He knows what I can do, and he counts on it every week. That came from a long time of building that trust and confidence. I have a track record with him that he and I built together.

There is more to my pay than just the mileage rate. I am paid tarping pay, and other accessory type pay. One of the things my dispatcher does is throw money my way as a way of saying thanks for helping him get certain things accomplished. Maybe he has a really tight load that needs to get done, or a load that other drivers are refusing because of difficulties involved in it. He trusts me to get it done, and then he adds extra dollars to my pay. He has the authority to do things like that, but he just has to earmark it as something acceptable to his managers. I leave all that to him. He does it often. I never question his discretion. He knows what he is doing, and he tells me that nobody questions him about giving extra pay to me. If he says I've earned it, I believe him, and apparently so do the people above him.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Just do some math. Steady milage is not normal. Average is more like it. My average is 2500 miles per week. I try to beat that. I have been with the same FM for over 3 years and have proven myself as a driver he doesn't have to worry about. He knows I get the job done. It is possible to gross 2000 per week, but at 2500 miles that's 80CPM. That doesn't happen. Most companies have bonus pay like layover, detention, hazmat , etc. I only count on CPM.

One of the reasons people make less the first year is the learning curve. The best thing to to is list your needs a pick a company that meets the most.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Crownified's Comment
member avatar

Thank you all for the responses. I actually have been out here driving for a year and a half already. I have just been stalking this page for many years. From what I learned from reading here it made my first year not nearly as stressful or hard as it could have been. I do average 2500-3000 miles weekly and my net pay is $1000-1300 as well. I think this is good money. It varies weekly so I say average as some weeks I get between 3-4K miles and others around 2 it just depends on the loads and waiting time. I have zero complaints and consider myself to be making good money. My FM trusts me as I have never been late, actually pretty much always early. When I saw Old Schools article I got curious so thank you for explaining your extra pay Old School. I also just wanted this thread for new people to see that the money in trucking is good if you take peoples advice and mostly learn how to manage your hours and keep a good relationship with dispatchers. After years of stalking and being Stuck at this receiver figured I could contribute something. I am not a fan of sitting around much so don’t mess around on internet often but this site helped me.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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