Based On This Data Is This A Good Company?

Topic 30489 | Page 1

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Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm considering driving for this local company. they are affiliated with the cdl school I went to and I took the cdl test at their facility.

Over the phone they aren't very helpful. They seem annoyed by my asking questions and almost reluctant to answer and instead just kept baiting me with stuff like "Let us know right away if you're interested, we have people waiting on a waitlist...loads going out this week...trainers ready...etc." They don't have benefits but they pay pretty well and apparently have a very well-maintained fleet and very good mechanics. I've been to their yard and I can confirm that everything seems pretty maintained, clean and orderly. The office staff is nice in person, but over the phone different story.

Any experienced drivers care to take a look at the data in these links and let me know what is says about the company? I'd really appreciate it! Been seeing lots of stuff on the web about how mega carriers aren't the best route and small or medium-sized carriers are the way to go if one will take you so, I decided to take this company into consideration.

quick transport solutions page

You can go to go to https://safer.fmcsa.dot.gov and go to "company snapshot" and search USDOT #: 1830061 to find their FMCSA page (URL link wouldn't work)

Their website: https://www.ltlpros.com/ (URL link also didn't work)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Pass would be my advice.

If you don't read it on here, but are reading "information and opinions" elsewhere on the internet, don't believe it to be 100% factual.

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Pass would be my advice.

If you don't read it on here, but are reading "information and opinions" elsewhere on the internet, don't believe it to be 100% factual.

Thanks for your input. Did you check out the data though?

Here's all I can find for reviews: Indeed.com page

If you google ltl pros you should be able to find their 11 google reviews

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I read it and a few things jump out at me. It's a small company, why do they change insurance companies so often, there are very few trailers which equals lots of live loading and unloading. You posted that there are few benefits and the person on the phone was not very forthcoming with needed information.

Internet reviews are the same as graffiti on a bathroom wall, especially concerning trucking companies IMHO.

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Just went and talked to them in person. Their drivers are actually 1099 independent contractors.... no benefits or retirement plan I asked if drivers have a way to easily verify they've been paid for all their miles, like access to their PC miler or whatever and she gave me a really confusing, roundabout answer. Asked if there were any drivers who would be willing to talk to me over the phone about their experience with the company and she basically says I would have to wait till I actually have a trainer to ask them about it and there wouldn't really be a point asking them before since "they're all on different contacts and have different experiences" or something along those lines...

Is this all stuff that's typically expected from smaller, privately owned companies?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Yes, it sure is, that's why we keep telling you on all these different topics you start to go with a large, well-established company that offers paid, company sponsored training.

How many times should we keep recommending this to you?

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, it sure is, that's why we keep telling you on all these different topics you start to go with a large, well-established company that offers paid, company sponsored training.

How many times should we keep recommending this to you?

You can blame the canadian dude from the Smart Trucking Youtube channel for getting it into my head, lol.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

There is a very good reason I don't watch Smart Trucking. You do not want to start at a small company that hires 1099 only.

Large companies offer better benefits and can get you home easier. If you have a problem, a larger company can repower a load if needed. They have contracts for maintenance on the road. They have more fringe benefits as well.

Pick a company that will hire and train you

Good luck.

By the way, most of us here got our starts at big companies and still drive for those companies.

You can too.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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