Day Cab O/O

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DoctorWho_214's Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone! Closing in on a year OTR with Wilson and just wanted to say that time went by quick. With my year counting down, I've been thinking about the opportunities that open up just with a year of experience under my belt. My goal is to get my own truck as an O/O and lease to a local carrier. I've saved up enough where I'll be able to purchase a used day cab w/ no or limited payments. Driving up and down highways and interstates, I see a lot of doubles and triples being pulled by day cabs, which I'm guessing is line haul (OD, Oak Harbor, ABF, etc)

My question is: Can I apply to these carriers as a line haul driver or even P&D/City driver but lease on with my own truck? Is that even an option? I recently did the most research with OD since that's closer to home and they have the best benefits and pay I've seen so, Bobcat_Bob or any OD driver, have you seen this while at OD? I appreciate any input!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

OD doesn't really do leases, I know we have a couple teams who lease but no day cabs. For the most part all the major LTL companies only run their own equipment unless they broker out a load. If you truly want to run linehaul as a O/O FedEx Ground is your best bet, however I heard those runs are difficult and expensive to get.

Personally, I'd advise just doing linehaul for one of the major companies you could make around 100k a year with benefits. Leas headaches and no expensive truck ownership required.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
DoctorWho_214's Comment
member avatar

I appreciate the reply Bobcat. I was curious about that and thought it was doable. I do have a fee more questions regarding OD, if you don't mind though.

Last home time, I was able to get my hazmat and doubles/ triples endorsement (completed the endorsement bingo as I like to say, being a former school bus driver) How often do you haul hazardous material, and how often does your route change because of it? I remember reading about how you can only take certain routes because of what you're hauling.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I don't mind at all. It can very hiw often I have Hazmat it can be a every day thing or nothing for a couple weeks. Average I'd say at least once a week. For me it doesn't really affect my route at all, we do not have too many restricted routes around here.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DoctorWho_214's Comment
member avatar

Gotcha. That makes sense. My plan is to transition from OTR to Linehaul or P&D. I'll hit my 1 year truck experience in November but I plan to apply a month before. Just trying to time it right so I don't have a break in income during the transition and application process. Do you think it will hurt my chances if I apply to early?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Doubt it would, most of the LTL companies need drivers ASAP and have become more flexible in their hiring.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Why not apply to the companies that are tailored to what you seek and drive their company tractor?

The "be my own boss", "my own truck would look great in my driveway", "I can do what I want with my own truck", and "an owner/operator will make more money" answers have already been disproved.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

As an O/O what benefits the company offers is a moot point. If you are an O/O or L/O the benefits and all expenses are on you. While ODFL may have great benefits, you would have to be a company driver to get them.

Which do you want? To be a business owner or company man.

DoctorWho_214's Comment
member avatar

No I get it. Company driver is definitely the only option for me at this point. That point hit hard especially now with my company truck in the shop because it needs new tires. 5500 for 4 new tires. Ouch

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

No I get it. Company driver is definitely the only option for me at this point. That point hit hard especially now with my company truck in the shop because it needs new tires. 5500 for 4 new tires. Ouch

As an O/O, I would be out there swapping my own tires to save a few hundred dollars. Most don't have at least the tools to do this, let alone the knowledge. Overhead headaches and back office issues are major reasons we always recommend being a company employee driver.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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