After 3 Months, I’m Quitting

Topic 30726 | Page 4

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Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Its interesting, I taught skiing, professionally for 10 years full time. In all that time, countless students of all different walks of life, sizes and athletic ability, including disabled ranging from mild to quads and everything in between, Ive only encountered one individual who simply could not learn to ski. She was very sweet yet morbidly obese to the point where it was a safety issue and health issue for her. We eventually got her adaptive equipment, yet she was very fearful of getting hurt, understandably so.

Skiing is a very physically demanding sport, but even more so, its mentally demanding. Its very counter intuitive. Our instincts as bipods, when on a pitched surface are to lean backwards. Its also the one singular thing that you should not do on a set of skis if you wish to control them. I actually spent most of my time on hill finding ways to get people to be centered on their equipment instead of leaning backwards, its usually the root of the problem. Theres all sorts of biomechanics, physics, psychology, learning theory, behavioral modes and concepts that surround it, but at the end of the day its as simple as our instincts and fear cause us problems.

Driving a truck, backing up a truck is a physical activity, a sport, just like any other. Its a set of learned muscle movements in response to stimuli, usually visual. We call those skills. Skills can be learned, which is simply a sustained change in behavior. Abilities on the other hand are innate qualities a person possesses, such as depth perception, agility, strength, spatial reasoning and the like. Abilities can, for the most part, be developed and improved.

Just as I have seen a miniscule amount of people who couldnt learn to ski, or ride motorcycles, and various other forms of equipment that Ive taught, I find it extremely unlikely that you simply can not learn to back the vehicle up successfully, eventually. I do, however, find it more likely that you can not learn to do it in as little time as you would like, and as easily as you would like. Let me propose something to consider, If your life depended on it, say you had to learn how to do it, with no time constraint on how long it took, would you eventually learn how to do it? Of course you would. So then it begs the question, what is stopping you from learning new skills?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Guy B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hate to see you throwing in the towel. I find for my own backing problems, like most, oversteer. Turning the steering wheel waaaay to much to get the trailer reacting. Then it's hooked at an angle, pull back out, try again. Less is more, easier to slowly add more turn, than subtract. Kinda like cooking, put too much spice in at the start, might ruin the meal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Its interesting, I taught skiing, professionally for 10 years full time. In all that time, countless students of all different walks of life, sizes and athletic ability, including disabled ranging from mild to quads and everything in between, Ive only encountered one individual who simply could not learn to ski. She was very sweet yet morbidly obese to the point where it was a safety issue and health issue for her. We eventually got her adaptive equipment, yet she was very fearful of getting hurt, understandably so.

Skiing is a very physically demanding sport, but even more so, its mentally demanding. Its very counter intuitive. Our instincts as bipods, when on a pitched surface are to lean backwards. Its also the one singular thing that you should not do on a set of skis if you wish to control them. I actually spent most of my time on hill finding ways to get people to be centered on their equipment instead of leaning backwards, its usually the root of the problem. Theres all sorts of biomechanics, physics, psychology, learning theory, behavioral modes and concepts that surround it, but at the end of the day its as simple as our instincts and fear cause us problems.

Driving a truck, backing up a truck is a physical activity, a sport, just like any other. Its a set of learned muscle movements in response to stimuli, usually visual. We call those skills. Skills can be learned, which is simply a sustained change in behavior. Abilities on the other hand are innate qualities a person possesses, such as depth perception, agility, strength, spatial reasoning and the like. Abilities can, for the most part, be developed and improved.

Just as I have seen a miniscule amount of people who couldnt learn to ski, or ride motorcycles, and various other forms of equipment that Ive taught, I find it extremely unlikely that you simply can not learn to back the vehicle up successfully, eventually. I do, however, find it more likely that you can not learn to do it in as little time as you would like, and as easily as you would like. Let me propose something to consider, If your life depended on it, say you had to learn how to do it, with no time constraint on how long it took, would you eventually learn how to do it? Of course you would. So then it begs the question, what is stopping you from learning new skills?

I instantly thought of Thumper rofl-3.gif

https://youtu.be/lJjDovqcieg

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Its interesting, I taught skiing, professionally for 10 years full time. In all that time, countless students of all different walks of life, sizes and athletic ability, including disabled ranging from mild to quads and everything in between, Ive only encountered one individual who simply could not learn to ski. She was very sweet yet morbidly obese to the point where it was a safety issue and health issue for her. We eventually got her adaptive equipment, yet she was very fearful of getting hurt, understandably so.

Skiing is a very physically demanding sport, but even more so, its mentally demanding. Its very counter intuitive. Our instincts as bipods, when on a pitched surface are to lean backwards. Its also the one singular thing that you should not do on a set of skis if you wish to control them. I actually spent most of my time on hill finding ways to get people to be centered on their equipment instead of leaning backwards, its usually the root of the problem. Theres all sorts of biomechanics, physics, psychology, learning theory, behavioral modes and concepts that surround it, but at the end of the day its as simple as our instincts and fear cause us problems.

Driving a truck, backing up a truck is a physical activity, a sport, just like any other. Its a set of learned muscle movements in response to stimuli, usually visual. We call those skills. Skills can be learned, which is simply a sustained change in behavior. Abilities on the other hand are innate qualities a person possesses, such as depth perception, agility, strength, spatial reasoning and the like. Abilities can, for the most part, be developed and improved.

Just as I have seen a miniscule amount of people who couldnt learn to ski, or ride motorcycles, and various other forms of equipment that Ive taught, I find it extremely unlikely that you simply can not learn to back the vehicle up successfully, eventually. I do, however, find it more likely that you can not learn to do it in as little time as you would like, and as easily as you would like. Let me propose something to consider, If your life depended on it, say you had to learn how to do it, with no time constraint on how long it took, would you eventually learn how to do it? Of course you would. So then it begs the question, what is stopping you from learning new skills?

double-quotes-end.png

I instantly thought of Thumper rofl-3.gif

https://youtu.be/lJjDovqcieg

rofl-3.gif rofl-3.gif rofl-2.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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