After 3 Months, I’m Quitting

Topic 30726 | Page 1

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Kevin C.'s Comment
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I’ve been team driving for about 2 months. I enjoy all aspects of driving except for backing. I can’t do it to save my life. I went through a backing course for a week and have practiced countless hours but I still can’t do it. And it’s not fair to my co-driver to wake them up every time I have to back in somewhere just because I’m incompetent. I’ve yet to back in anywhere successfully. Since I do enjoy driving, I was wondering if there are any driving jobs that do not require backing? If not, I’m done with this. Thanks.

Banks's Comment
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It could be that you're not getting it because you're always asking somebody else to do it. Everybody struggles with backing and the way they improve is by doing it themselves.

I can't think of any jobs that don't require backing of some sort.

Mikey B.'s Comment
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No, there are no driving jobs that don't require backing at some time or another. I'd have to agree with Banks though, before you quit over that, stop getting your co-driver to back for you. Do it solo regardless of how hard you struggle. Do that for one month, if you still can't do it THEN hang it up. Some people just take longer than others to learn it but once it clicks you've got it for life. Give YOURSELF a fair shot at it and by you I mean only you. If it takes you half an hour to back in then so be it, don't ask him to do it for you.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

Maybe it is just me, but I cannot learn something in a month, I take thd second, the third, whichever month it takes. Let's be honest - there are people around who are not the sharpest knives in a drawer, and yet their backing is perfect. And that says it all...

On another note, do drivers who do triples have to back?

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

It takes most new solo driver five to six months before being comfortable with backing. Last night I waited for two experienced drives to back into tight spots at an FJ. When they were done I was able to get by to turn around for my shot. Got right in. Next morning I had trouble with an easy back into a door. It doesn't matter how long you take as long as you GOAL and don't hit anything.

Don't give up just yet. Go solo and practice every chance you get.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Maybe it is just me, but I cannot learn something in a month, I take thd second, the third, whichever month it takes. Let's be honest - there are people around who are not the sharpest knives in a drawer, and yet their backing is perfect. And that says it all...

On another note, do drivers who do triples have to back?

Yes actually, doubles and triples drivers DO have to back. Those trailers aren't coupled forever. They must unhook then back two or three short trailers individually which are harder to back than 48 or 53 footers.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Backing is the hardest part of this job. Been driving 3 years...took awhile figuring it out. Get out and GOAL. Part of the job...really going to hang it up over this? To me, team driving would make me quit before backing....I need my space. You can do this....easiest backing screws me up. Give me a challenge and I nail it. Last 2 deliveries were insane...East Coast, old outdated facilities. Nailed it both times. Watch your wagon.

Rhino's Comment
member avatar

Yup I do it a lot. I’m 2 months in and my backing isn’t the greatest but the more I do it the better it gets. Will just take time. Just go slow n small movements.

double-quotes-start.png

Maybe it is just me, but I cannot learn something in a month, I take thd second, the third, whichever month it takes. Let's be honest - there are people around who are not the sharpest knives in a drawer, and yet their backing is perfect. And that says it all...

On another note, do drivers who do triples have to back?

double-quotes-end.png

Yes actually, doubles and triples drivers DO have to back. Those trailers aren't coupled forever. They must unhook then back two or three short trailers individually which are harder to back than 48 or 53 footers.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ive been doing this for 3 or 4 months now. I routinely mess up simple backs, detailed and tight ones I can nail because I slow down and think about what Im doing. Sometimes I just randomly back, no plan, for practice in an empty lot, just so I can watch the trailer and learn the mechanics of it. It takes time. I dont care how slow I go, how many times I GOAL. If you dont hit anything, it was a success.

As was said, take a month of doing it by yourself and then revise if you want to quit. Also, maybe the problem isnt your backing. Perhaps its your expectations that you place on yourself that you should be able to back up by now. Hell, Im just happy if I get it backed in without hitting something. I gave up on thinking that I should be a member of the master backer-uppers guild by 3 months experience.

James H.'s Comment
member avatar

On another note, do drivers who do triples have to back?

In addition to backing the trailers in to their doors after you've broken your set, you also have to back up when hooking your set: you back the lead trailer up to the following trailer, with a dolly staged in front of it. You'd do this once for doubles , twice for triples. And you also have to back the dolly into place. The dolly turns really fast so it requires some getting used to, but once you get it close enough you unhook it from your tractor and can roll it into place by hand.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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