Anybody Have Info On RV Transport?

Topic 30808 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Jake B.'s Comment
member avatar

I have an opportunity to lease a truck from my parents. It is an F350 with the 6.7 powerstroke and SRW. I would like to do RV transport full time with it. I am in the SLC Utah area.

1. Is it feasible to do it full time?

2. Will I have enough truck?

3. How much money would I need to start?

4. Do I need a CDL?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Dan67's Comment
member avatar

Google Horizon RV Transport

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I have an opportunity to lease a truck from my parents.

Hey Jake, that is the first red flag for me. I don't like going into a business arrangement with family. Maybe it is just my family, but it usually doesn't turn out good. It seems to me you are just wanting a job, and maybe your parents are wanting you to get one too. I think I would avoid having them involved in this. Where is the first place you are going to skip making payments when the money gets tight? I'll bet it's your parents because you think they will be willing to help you through a tough time. Don't do it. You will only build resentment in your parents who were willing to help.

Is it feasible to do it full time?

That one is hard to answer, but I think it is a job you can do as much or as little as you want. We have several RV dealerships in our town and I actually looked into this one time. Most of them used their own employees to go to the manufacturers and pick up the units they ordered. The others used some retired gentlemen in town who just enjoyed traveling and making a few bucks while doing it. The dealerships figure out how they can make the most money off their product sales. One corner they can cut is delivery expenses. The cheapest price gets the work.

Will I have enough truck?

Yes, but trucks don't last forever. What are you going to do after wearing out your parent's truck? It will only take a few years to really rack up some miles on that thing. You have to approach this decision as starting a business. You are not just starting a job. Do you have any understanding of how to calculate your overhead or your future expenses and ability to replace aging equipment? You need to have a realistic plan. Right now you don't have that. Otherwise you wouldn't be asking this next question.

How much money would I need to start?

I'm not even sure why you think we would know. Do you need a trailer? Have you ever thought about how much more efficient you would be if you could haul two or three RVs at once? Do you have any idea about the expense of a trailer? Have you thought about insurance? You'd be making a grave mistake if you thought the insurance your parents have on the truck now would be sufficient. I had a banker tell me something years ago that I discovered to be true. I had put together a considerable sum of money and was going to borrow some money from this banker to add to it so I could start a manufacturing business. He knew all about my situation. He told me as a rule of thumb to figure out how much I would need to get started and then multiply that by three.

Do I need a CDL?

That's a tricky one, let's just say it is preferable. It kind of depends on a few things. I believe you will be driving a combination vehicle crossing state lines doing commerce. You will limit your opportunities by not having one, but you could still do some of the work. Just remember you are competing against a bunch of retired guys who are going to be willing to do it cheaper than you. A CDL will allow you to take jobs they can't do and charge better prices for your work. That assumes you have a trailer large enough to haul multiple units.

Okay, I've just been trying to give you some things to think about, but here's my opinion. This is a case of trying to buy yourself a job. There is no reason to do that. Just go get a job. I don't know anybody who is honestly making a career out of hauling RVs. You can make a lot more money by driving a big truck for a major carrier and they will cover all the expenses. The choice would be clear to me, but like I said, that is just my opinion.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jake, you have asked us about RV transport before. It was almost two years ago. What have you been doing all this time? Are you working somewhere? Do you just enjoy doing research into trucking careers? You have even had a CDL before. What's the deal man? Do you want to do this?

I know there are a lot of reasons for delaying a trucking career. I am not even wanting you to answer my questions. I just want you to think about what you are doing. Trucking takes a huge commitment. Not everybody has that. There is no shame in not being able to get into trucking. It is a tough lifestyle for some while it is pure pleasure for others. The only thing certain about it is that you really need to want it if you are going to make it out here. That strong desire takes the form of commitment and dedication to making things happen.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Did we advise not to do it then?

Why use a little truck to do a big job? A truck truly designed for that type of work will cost about 2/3 the sticker price of an OTR tractor. I drop a trailer and I still have a home on wheels. Can't say that about a pickup truck.

Why use a truck that dies before 300,000 miles, when a Class 8 truck is just getting started?

Why jump into something that anybody can do? All you need is a pickup truck. If it's about making money, and it truly is easy, wouldn't everyone be pursuing this?

Is there a big market demand for RVs now, since Summer just ended?

Looking at the economy since The Imposter started in January, I don't see lots of extra income spending for the foreseeable future. People would rather eat and buy clothes.

Why not get a CDL two years ago and start hauling freight for an established business with resources and benefits?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Kind of like starting a restaurant. Very low success rate. One of the guys I went to CDL school was only there to haul cars interstate with his own truck. He went belly up and is now driving for JB Hunt chasing a paycheck to pay off his debt.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More