ODFL Is A Great Company But I Am Trying To Run Away From NYC.

Topic 30934 | Page 1

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Marcin M.'s Comment
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Enough is enough. NYC is getting worse, even cops are suggesting to move out, when I reported my car stolen recently. I am ready to move out and finally start my trucking career. As a rookie I was hired by Old Dominion as line haul driver but after 3 nights I had to stop - I could not sleep during a day for more than 2hrs, stressed out, struggling with downshifting on 10 speed transmission, pulling doubles from day 1 with a trainer, decided it is not safe for me and others to continue. They offered me daytime local position, I applied as internal but few days passed by without a response and had to move forward and got hired by paratransit company to start earning any money. ODFL is great company, yesterday I was at the terminal to pick up a paycheck (I was suprised and happy that they paid me - I really wished I could continue to work for them as a line haul driver). Operating manager followed me outside of the building and told me that if I will change my mind and drive for them as a local driver he is eager to take me back. I am a long time reader of this forum and heard advice not to start career as a local driver, specially here, in NYC but maybe in a different city/state... I would like to move out from NYC, thinking about Florida, Texas but I am open for other states as well. It will be hard journey, from buying a car, finding an employer, apartment, moving but I am determined. This is first time I am facing such a situation, dont know where/how to start. Did anyone experience such a situation before? Any advice will be appreciated.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I would like to move out from NYC, thinking about Florida, Texas but I am open for other states as well. It will be hard journey, from buying a car, finding an employer, apartment, moving but I am determined. This is first time I am facing such a situation, dont know where/how to start.

That statement makes it sound like you are ideal material for being an OTR driver. You don't need a car or an apartment to do that. Sell your stuff or put it in storage until you know what it is you want. You could live in the truck and discover all the wonders of this great nation. You may even come upon a place you want to settle into at a later date. When you need or want a break from living in the truck you just stay at a hotel for a few nights. You can take home time wherever you want. You are already struggling at the things we try to help people understand. Get that one year commitment to OTR under your belt and you will have a whole new appreciation for this career and a good foot in the door for some other sort of trucking job that appeals to you more.

I take home time in a number of places. Sometimes I am visiting my children, or maybe I just stay somewhere that interests me. There is a liberty that comes with the OTR lifestyle that is very rewarding at times. I think you should consider it. You will certainly get your career off to a good start that way, and you have a lifetime ahead to pursue other types of trucking jobs if that is what you ultimately want.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I second Old Schools response. Perfect candidate for OTR. I started OTR 2.5 years or so ago, I live in my truck fulltime with a dog. I have no home, two cars, family to visit and almost no bills. I put most of my income into stocks, metals and savings. This is a fantastic lifestyle and later on if you decide to do local you will have the experience needed and a pile of money sitting in the bank.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh, I forgot to add, if you are a Democrat and chose to move to Texas or Florida, just remember to leave your voting ways behind so as to not make your new home into what you ran away from...😆.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Marcin, you just got some great advice from two great sources. I'm like Mikey, living in my truck. It's not for everyone, but if you can do it you can sock away money at a pretty fast clip. And if you go OTR you will, in all likelihood, be issued an Automated transmission truck which makes life even easier. No property taxes, no homeowner's insurance, the company maintains your home, many, many other advantages. There has been much written here about living in the truck, so feel free to ask your questions and see if it's for you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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