Got First Citations/violations Today... What Now?

Topic 31635 | Page 1

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Brandon T.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, after 4 years of a clean commercial record, I stupidly passed a slow moving truck in the left lane in a PA turnpike tunnel today. Hindsight is 20/20 and tells me that slowing down and losing 45 seconds of time was the much better choice, but in the moment, I thought I could get away with passing. I’m fully aware it was stupid and impatience got the best of me... lesson learned.

On DOT inspection report, I received an improper lane change violation and a lane restriction violation. Two citations received also that were ‘dropped’ to regulation of PA turnpike. Citations carry no points against license, but will be on MVR obviously.

My question is: now what? What does this mean? Are those two citations linked to the inspection violations to where they will get dropped if citations do, or are they separate situations now and the inspection violations are there for good? (Well, 3 years).

Current employer didn’t seem super upset, so I think I’m fine here, but overthinking me will just assume I’m fired for a few days lol. But, how seriously will these two violations impact me in the job hunt going forward? Have been OTR for a year and a half now and have recently decided I’m ready to start being home daily again, but not sure what kind of curveball this will be for the job hunt. Obviously a clean record is the best record, but what exactly constitutes a ‘bad’ record? In other words, will these violations put me in the typical driver category in a prospective employer’s eyes or am I now in the high-risk, bad record category?

Appreciate any feedback, and am fully understanding of the inevitable “it’s not hard to read signs”, “learn some patience”, “way to jeopardize your career” comments.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't think you'd have too much to worry about. Those citations don't exactly fit into the "bad" category, in my opinion. Those kinds of violations happen all the time, and the officer simply had a "gotcha!" moment. It doesn't make it right, what you did. But it's not like speeding or reckless driving.

That said, they won't exactly help either. Obviously you don't want to get any more citations going forward.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I think Turtle is exactly right on this. We know you're beating yourself up over this, but as long as you have been a solid driver this will not affect your current job negatively. As far as seeking a different job it may work against you but only minimally.

Be careful and don't let dumb stuff happen to you like this. You gave an officer a golden opportunity and he took it.

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Brandon,

I got a warning on an inspection for the same thing in georgia. I passed in the left lane with a sign that said no trucks and received a lane violation.

It gave my carrier a couple points on our CSA score and didn't effect our insurance premiums at all. Honestly, the industry cares about out of service violations a lot more than these little slap on the wrist things.

As far as the job hunt, you should have a copy of your MVR , PSP, and your DAC report. All can be got online with minimal effort. Some places weigh violations are much as citations so be prepared for them to count it against you. But if this is the only thing you have on your record for the past 3 years it shouldn't make or break anything. Good luck and be careful.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

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