Non-driving Jobs In Trucking

Topic 31721 | Page 2

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Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Trash companies, like Waste Management, is about the biggest in the country Having Roll-off trucks, some backing, but mostly in and around construction sites. Not really much of perfection backs I'd guess.

Guess WM bought up this place...Is quite a lot of refuse haulers in GA

Advanced Disposal (Now WM) - Athens Hauling Watkinsville, GA

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks, I appreciate it. I’ve actually been driving a transit bus. Pay is lousy but I can at least keep my head above water. I’ve noticed that a lot of the jobs you mentioned require special skills of which I almost have zero. I thought maybe I could be a dock worker. Not sure what they earn, however.

double-quotes-start.png

Not knowing where you are (geographically), it’s tough to say. But…

If you gave up on driving seven months ago, what have you been doing since? It sounds like you’ve eliminated truck driving as one one of your strengths, since all require some backing.

I read your post last night and my first thought was what Bobcat Bob said. Trucking companies are like any other business; they have HR, sales, accounting and all kinds of other jobs. What about forklift operator? Lots of backing, but it’s not a combination vehicle.

If you’re looking to drive, what about a delivery driver of a straight truck (plants, parts, appliances, supplies, etc.)?

Much is gonna depend on where you live and I don’t know where that is.

I hope this helps.

double-quotes-end.png

Typically, better paying jobs do so BECAUSE they require special skills or experience. Some jobs pay better because nobody wants the job. It sounds like you want the pay without having the knowledge or experience.

You’re asking us to provide the answers to a non-trucking question.

Here’s the truth; you can go do ANYTHING you want. The question is; what are you willing to do for it?

Make a decision on what you want to do and then commit yourself COMPLETELY.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Full time dock workers at Old Dominion start at $20+ an hour. I see lots of places advertising dock/warehouse work near that pay.

Kevin C.'s Comment
member avatar

No! I don’t expect a high paying job without skills or experience. But I know people making more than I do doing unskilled, manual labor. I just thought I may elicit some insight into non-driving jobs in the trucking industry but that must be too much for which to ask. I can’t help the fact that I never gained any backing skills as a driver despite my best effort. I know I’m not the most intelligent person around, but it seems that though in the minority, I’m sure I’m not the only one who has had to leave trucking simply because they couldn’t grasp backing principles. Just because someone is unable to exhibit a specific skill doesn’t necessarily mean they didn’t put their best foot forward in the learning process.

double-quotes-start.png

Thanks, I appreciate it. I’ve actually been driving a transit bus. Pay is lousy but I can at least keep my head above water. I’ve noticed that a lot of the jobs you mentioned require special skills of which I almost have zero. I thought maybe I could be a dock worker. Not sure what they earn, however.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Not knowing where you are (geographically), it’s tough to say. But…

If you gave up on driving seven months ago, what have you been doing since? It sounds like you’ve eliminated truck driving as one one of your strengths, since all require some backing.

I read your post last night and my first thought was what Bobcat Bob said. Trucking companies are like any other business; they have HR, sales, accounting and all kinds of other jobs. What about forklift operator? Lots of backing, but it’s not a combination vehicle.

If you’re looking to drive, what about a delivery driver of a straight truck (plants, parts, appliances, supplies, etc.)?

Much is gonna depend on where you live and I don’t know where that is.

I hope this helps.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Typically, better paying jobs do so BECAUSE they require special skills or experience. Some jobs pay better because nobody wants the job. It sounds like you want the pay without having the knowledge or experience.

You’re asking us to provide the answers to a non-trucking question.

Here’s the truth; you can go do ANYTHING you want. The question is; what are you willing to do for it?

Make a decision on what you want to do and then commit yourself COMPLETELY.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kevin C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks. I started looking for that kind of work in my area but haven’t found much. That’s a lot more than I’m making now.

Full time dock workers at Old Dominion start at $20+ an hour. I see lots of places advertising dock/warehouse work near that pay.

Greg M.'s Comment
member avatar

I would say try dispatching for a local carrier.

Hi. I drove team for four months and found it quite challenging. Mostly, I found out I couldn’t back and always had to wake my teammate to back into a dock. I practiced for quite sometime on my backing skills but just can’t do it. I tried getting another job as a solo driver but failed their driving test. The tester told me it was probably best if I didn’t pursue any driving jobs anymore for my own good. My question is whether there are any non-driving jobs in the trucking industry that I could do?

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