Looking For Teammate From San Diego CA

Topic 32027 | Page 1

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Rookie_the_Great's Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone Schneider has a dedicated route from San Diego CA but it requires me to have teammate, and they don't offer anyone. I'm a zero experience driver and I will go thru their 3 weeks training in Phoenix AZ. If you are interested, we can chat n meet up to see if we are good matches. Please text me at 56I-765-70I7.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Where does this dedicated route go to? To me it sounds long distance, which is fine but if it ends up in New York City or Boston or Washington DC, people may not want to run team to those places.

Laura

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rookie_the_Great's Comment
member avatar

Where does this dedicated route go to? To me it sounds long distance, which is fine but if it ends up in New York City or Boston or Washington DC, people may not want to run team to those places.

Laura

Good question and my bad, I didn't ask :( He said it's 11 day otr , 3 days home time.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rookie_the_Great's Comment
member avatar

(couldn't edit main post so I add it here) I really don't want to deal with dropping/picking up truck in another town in CA and spend money (don't have car right now) and my home time driving back and forth to San Diego CA. If you know good carriers with terminal in San Diego CA who train zero experienced drivers, please let me know.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

(couldn't edit main post so I add it here) I really don't want to deal with dropping/picking up truck in another town in CA and spend money (don't have car right now) and my home time driving back and forth to San Diego CA. If you know good carriers with terminal in San Diego CA who train zero experienced drivers, please let me know.

Howdy, RTG !! If you mentioned, I missed it. M or F ?

Also; this is why we usually suggest Company Sponsored Training !! Right after you graduate, you are in a truck!

I'm trying to get StevoReno to reply; he's out that way. . . but until then, have you looked into CalArk? One of our 'former' members here on TT started with TransAm, and moved on to Cal Ark. She's now reporting her journey on Twitter (sadly not here!) but you can look her up; Ashley Loucks is her twitter handle.

Marten Transport is another great one; Harvey C.'s son drives for them, out of Cali. He was a 'freshie,' as well.

There's many more, but that's a start!

Best wishes, I'll keep thinking up more, haha!

~ Anne ~

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
If you know good carriers with terminal in San Diego CA who train zero experienced drivers, please let me know.

Why do they need to be in San Diego? Most of our members don't live anywhere near a terminal. They take the truck to their home, or park it in a nearby location such as a truckstop, drop lot or a variety of other legal parking options. As long as the company hires from an area they have freight going through there frequently enough to get you home.

In the big picture, the only time terminal location in relation to your home matters is if you're home daily. Sure, it'd be convenient to run home while repairs are done on the truck but chances are you more often than not will not be anywhere near your home terminal when you need service. You'll likely be sent to whatever terminal is closest, or truck stop with a shop. Don't limit yourself. Apply For Paid CDL Training and see who offers you a spot.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

My apologies I forgot you have your CDL already. Use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs. There are also some not included such as Swift, C.R. England, CFI and Werner to name a few.

There are also LTL companies such as Fed Ex Freight, ABF and others that often times take someone fresh out of school. Be warned that although you'll be home daily these jobs are typically not ideal for rookies simply because they don't have the skills yet. We have members that have thrived in this environment and many others that have washed out. I'm not sure if LTL would be wise at this time though given the current economy. I've seen here and elsewhere that freight volume has dropped quite a bit and they operate on a seniority based system. It may affect you regularly having work available but that's something Bobcat, Banks, Delco Dave and a few others would be better informed of if it interests you.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Rookie_the_Great's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

(couldn't edit main post so I add it here) I really don't want to deal with dropping/picking up truck in another town in CA and spend money (don't have car right now) and my home time driving back and forth to San Diego CA. If you know good carriers with terminal in San Diego CA who train zero experienced drivers, please let me know.

double-quotes-end.png

Howdy, RTG !! If you mentioned, I missed it. M or F ?

Also; this is why we usually suggest Company Sponsored Training !! Right after you graduate, you are in a truck!

I'm trying to get StevoReno to reply; he's out that way. . . but until then, have you looked into CalArk? One of our 'former' members here on TT started with TransAm, and moved on to Cal Ark. She's now reporting her journey on Twitter (sadly not here!) but you can look her up; Ashley Loucks is her twitter handle.

Marten Transport is another great one; Harvey C.'s son drives for them, out of Cali. He was a 'freshie,' as well.

There's many more, but that's a start!

Best wishes, I'll keep thinking up more, haha!

~ Anne ~

Thanks! CalArk does not have San Diego area positions but applied for TransAm :) Marten seems a great company, working on my application now! and they have positions very close to me :) Also in a couple of other forums, people were so nice to me too and gave me some carrier names. I am researching about them and apply right away if I find myself fit for it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Rookie_the_Great's Comment
member avatar

My apologies I forgot you have your CDL already. Use this link to Apply For Truck Driving Jobs. There are also some not included such as Swift, C.R. England, CFI and Werner to name a few.

There are also LTL companies such as Fed Ex Freight, ABF and others that often times take someone fresh out of school. Be warned that although you'll be home daily these jobs are typically not ideal for rookies simply because they don't have the skills yet. We have members that have thrived in this environment and many others that have washed out. I'm not sure if LTL would be wise at this time though given the current economy. I've seen here and elsewhere that freight volume has dropped quite a bit and they operate on a seniority based system. It may affect you regularly having work available but that's something Bobcat, Banks, Delco Dave and a few others would be better informed of if it interests you.

Good luck.

Thanks! I totally understand what you mean and I personally do not look for a home daily job at all. It is going to be lots of wasted time, energy and gas commuting home back and forth daily. I don't even have a car for daily commuting. As you said, not good for a new driver. But seems most of big carriers require driver to pickup and drop off truck in their terminal/hub during home time, for example Schneider told me that if I cannot get the San Diego position due to not having a teammate, I can choose San Bernardino or La Puente CA positions, but I have to drop off and pickup truck there. For someone like me without a car, it means over two or three hundred dollars of Uber/Lyft expense every week or so for being home less than 36 hours! 36 hours or even two days is not that much that I rely on public transportation for visiting home. And I absolutely cannot even think about moving somewhere else, my rent and living condition is unbelievably low in this specific place.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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