Need Help Finishing CDL - Just Road Test Portion In NY

Topic 32076 | Page 3

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Hi. There is no reason to need all 3 lanes. My test course uses the same type here, but 2 lanes, not 3. Hug the left white line before the curve as early as possible. The further away from the curb the tandems are before you even enter the curve, the better. Turn slightly into the middle lane watching the mirrors.

Think of it as "dragging the tandems" away from the curb. Then tandems are your pivot point. When they pivot around the curb, you will be safe to come back into the oane. Once u see the tandems are following about a foot away from the curb, you should be able to turn back into the right lane, preventing the tandems for jumping the curb.

Crossing the double solid yellow line into oncoming traffic is an automatic fail in my state.

I was confused by you saying you should have followed the red line cause I teach it to follow the blue that you posted.

I'm just repeating what the proctor told me. I can see using just the one lane over to the left myself, but he was probably talking about in all of his crazy experiences as a proctor.

Thanks for the tips!

Joe, many of our TT members either have (or do) hail from NY, or drive the vicinity. I'm not sure who's diaries, if any, could help you. Thinking out loud, have you looked at Grumpy Old Man with H.R. Wolding ? Drives NY on a regular. Turtle ? Hails from, and does WMPF. Owner of this site, Brett... upstate NY. Susan D. with WST?? (West Side Transport) may be another to look into how 'they' handled 'stuff.'

(My other half did NYC and New England, earlier in his career. Would he again? Not but for a great payday, he says!)

Many vets of TT have explained as best they could, in your situation. Rob T's a 'city' driver, and sure spelled it out for ya! Other than the above posters, I've added a few you can look into. Erroll V. sure had a ton of 'situational' stimulation/simulations in his posts. Look him up, as well...if you have time.

That's a few. George B., I believe, has some roots & family there. Sure, MUCH has changed since the 02/07/2022 ELDT mandates. Could this conundrum be as 'simple' as the Jug Handle / Button Hook conundrum .. perhaps?

0394855001658101788.jpg

Just a few thoughts, in or 'outside' the box. Hope you find your 'sweet spot' and graduate; asap!

~ Anne & Tom ~

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

Did you ever test again can I ask what school you went to also NTTS here in Buffalo has a terrible pass rate for the actual cdl exam. Some people are on the 4th or 5th times I go for my first time on 8/5.

West Seneca course.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I’ve never been around that particular curve, but it looks to me that if you hug the white line to the left as you approach the turn, and all the way through it, then as you clear the median swing into the middle lane, you should clear. Just be sure you don’t swing into the middle too soon because if you hit the left curb in the median you will fail.

As you clear the left side watch your tandems on the right if you are getting too close to the curb swing left then back right. Once your tandems clear swing all the way back to the right lane to finish.

Generally if you hug the white line to the left you will be fine, but you might need the second lane because that one is over 90°

As far as failing if you go over the double lines, that is probably true for the test. In real life, my company has told me I can legally use the entire roadway if needed to safely make a turn.

I have expanded that in Rhode Island to include the sidewalk on the left, the entire roadway, plus the sidewalk on the right. And still barely missed a telephone pole. :)

In Pittsburgh, be prepared to use an entire intersection as well, and still be on the sidewalk. You do what you have to. Just watch your tandems and don’t hit anything.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I think this is why my first trainer had such a problem with me.

I paid $3500 for my CDL , plus about $1000 in hotel room, and he paid $13000 at NTTS.

He failed twice and finally passed with a bunch of points deducted, and I passed first time, no points, and the instructor asked if I had ever held a CDL before, and insinuated he thought I was a plant to make sure he was doing his job.

I don’t think too much of NTTS.

My school was small, but every minute I spent in the truck, I was driving, never shared with anyone.

Did you ever test again can I ask what school you went to also NTTS here in Buffalo has a terrible pass rate for the actual cdl exam. Some people are on the 4th or 5th times I go for my first time on 8/5.

double-quotes-start.png

West Seneca course.

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

William D.'s Comment
member avatar

I graduated Today with. 96 avg from NTTS in buffalo passed my last two road ride tests with a 96 I feel confident in my driving abilities my pre trip is 98avg. Number 1 in my class of 6 weekers I go next week to orchard park for my road test but yeah ntts graduation rate is good but the pass/fail for the cdl exam is supposedly 8 out of 10 fail 😲

I think this is why my first trainer had such a problem with me.

I paid $3500 for my CDL, plus about $1000 in hotel room, and he paid $13000 at NTTS.

He failed twice and finally passed with a bunch of points deducted, and I passed first time, no points, and the instructor asked if I had ever held a CDL before, and insinuated he thought I was a plant to make sure he was doing his job.

I don’t think too much of NTTS.

My school was small, but every minute I spent in the truck, I was driving, never shared with anyone.

double-quotes-start.png

Did you ever test again can I ask what school you went to also NTTS here in Buffalo has a terrible pass rate for the actual cdl exam. Some people are on the 4th or 5th times I go for my first time on 8/5.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

West Seneca course.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I graduated Today with. 96 avg from NTTS in buffalo passed my last two road ride tests with a 96 I feel confident in my driving abilities my pre trip is 98avg. Number 1 in my class of 6 weekers I go next week to orchard park for my road test but yeah ntts graduation rate is good but the pass/fail for the cdl exam is supposedly 8 out of 10 fail 😲

double-quotes-start.png

I think this is why my first trainer had such a problem with me.

I paid $3500 for my CDL, plus about $1000 in hotel room, and he paid $13000 at NTTS.

He failed twice and finally passed with a bunch of points deducted, and I passed first time, no points, and the instructor asked if I had ever held a CDL before, and insinuated he thought I was a plant to make sure he was doing his job.

I don’t think too much of NTTS.

My school was small, but every minute I spent in the truck, I was driving, never shared with anyone.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Did you ever test again can I ask what school you went to also NTTS here in Buffalo has a terrible pass rate for the actual cdl exam. Some people are on the 4th or 5th times I go for my first time on 8/5.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

West Seneca course.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Congrats, William! dancing-dog.gif

Now, for the FUN part; let us know!

~ Anne ~

good-luck.gif good-luck-2.gif good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Page 3 of 3 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Becoming A Truck Driver CDL Exam CDL Test Preparation Tips For Backing Truck Driver Training
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More