Another Long-time Reader Coming Out Of The Shadows

Topic 32094 | Page 1

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Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

I've been waiting a long time to say this, but Hi Trucking Truth! I luckily stumbled upon this great website many years ago, and have learned so much as I pondered entering this industry. I decided back then that I'd wait to post until I had concrete plans to start my trucking career, and that time is finally near.

My plans have changed since way back when, as times have changed and I learned more and more through my research right here. So for a long while now, my thoughts were to follow the advice here of going Company-sponsored for training, and I like the reasons why. My only concern with that though, are my long-term career goals. I am 36, leaving a job/career that I've been at since I was 19, and would love to drive professionally for the rest of my working days. I definitely want to start OTR , dry-van, with a mega carrier, for the experience and adventure. After staying with my first company one-year solo and who knows how many more, I may want to venture into the LTL world. With the recent discussions of the Auto Restriction and how it might not be so easy to remove down the road, I am now wondering if it is best to attend the local community college by me that trains on manual. In fact, a training diary was done about that school, College of DuPage by Keith M. of Aurora, IL. I have previously attended one of the many informational sessions they put on and liked what I saw and heard. I just want to do what's best to set myself up for success.

I look forward to the advice I will receive by the experienced pros here, look forward to becoming an active member as my career eventually takes off (I am about two months away from being ready to apply/start), and hope to one day reach top-tier status by putting to practice all I've learned and will continue to learn here.

Thanks everyone!

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

I've been waiting a long time to say this, but Hi Trucking Truth! I luckily stumbled upon this great website many years ago, and have learned so much as I pondered entering this industry. I decided back then that I'd wait to post until I had concrete plans to start my trucking career, and that time is finally near.

My plans have changed since way back when, as times have changed and I learned more and more through my research right here. So for a long while now, my thoughts were to follow the advice here of going Company-sponsored for training, and I like the reasons why. My only concern with that though, are my long-term career goals. I am 36, leaving a job/career that I've been at since I was 19, and would love to drive professionally for the rest of my working days. I definitely want to start OTR , dry-van, with a mega carrier, for the experience and adventure. After staying with my first company one-year solo and who knows how many more, I may want to venture into the LTL world. With the recent discussions of the Auto Restriction and how it might not be so easy to remove down the road, I am now wondering if it is best to attend the local community college by me that trains on manual. In fact, a training diary was done about that school, College of DuPage by Keith M. of Aurora, IL. I have previously attended one of the many informational sessions they put on and liked what I saw and heard. I just want to do what's best to set myself up for success.

I look forward to the advice I will receive by the experienced pros here, look forward to becoming an active member as my career eventually takes off (I am about two months away from being ready to apply/start), and hope to one day reach top-tier status by putting to practice all I've learned and will continue to learn here.

Thanks everyone!

Oh, wow . . . 5 years ?!?!?

Welcome 'PROPER' then, Sandman!

You've probably 'seen' these links, but . . . if not, this is a great beginning!

There's so much wealth of information within this forum, as I'm sure you know!

Keep reading, keep asking, keep 'swimming!'

Glad you've come about;

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

There is no way in hell I could honestly recommend a local CDL school over company sponsored. As a trainer, I am meeting more and more students from local schools who can barely drive. It seems some school take your money and don't care.

Also... The manual restriction argument is lessening.in strength. Only 5% of trucks being manufactured are manuals. By the time you change companies in a couple years, they will be getting in in age.

Check out Swift and CFI, Create and others. See what happens.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

There is no way in hell I could honestly recommend a local CDL school over company sponsored. As a trainer, I am meeting more and more students from local schools who can barely drive. It seems some school take your money and don't care.

Also... The manual restriction argument is lessening.in strength. Only 5% of trucks being manufactured are manuals. By the time you change companies in a couple years, they will be getting in in age.

Check out Swift and CFI, Crete and others. See what happens.

I second that, Kearsey!

CFI, Crete, and Swift/Knight are ALL awesome, as are these: Paid CDL Training Programs

Here's a great article, by Brett: Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training ~ the Truths.

Best to ya, good sir!

~ Anne ~

ps: If you have any DMV or 'legal' past issues, there are some paid CDL companies that are more forgiving than others; we can guide you there, as well! A 'crisp' CDL from a private school offers little 'hands on' training in the real world, and even LESS guarantee of a job.

(Job placement is an OVERUSED and exaggerated, 'buzz word.')

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Excellent, thanks for the replies! I had been planning on company-sponsored for so long after reading of its benefits here, I just wanted to double-check that it's still the right call with my specific career goals in mind. Anne, it's been even longer than five years, that's just when I had made an account...which I forgot I had done until I started the High Road awhile back. Stopped for awhile as plans got put on hold, but now it's time to reset and restart.

In no particular order, my top company picks are Knight/Swift, Roehl, Schneider, and CFI. I will apply using the link here and see who bites and narrow my list down from there; I'm really not picky, as I know from here it doesn't matter who's name is on the door. I'd prefer dry van , but not opposed to reefer...but I am not cut out for flatbed!

I love that there's so many facets of the industry, some I'm sure I've never even heard of yet. I will stay with my first company at least for the first year, possibly/probably more, to start learning the trade, then see what piques my interest from there.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies! Hope this doesn't post twice, I tried once and it didn't take, so attempt two (operator error I'm sure, not very tech-savvy!)

I have been planning on going company-sponsored for so long after reading of its benefits here, just wanted to make sure that was still the right call for my circumstances. I will continue on that plan then. Anne, it's been even longer for my reader-status, I forgot I made an account 5 years ago until I started the High Road awhile back. As circumstances changed I stopped, so now it is time to reset it and restart.

When it's time, I'll use the link here to apply. In general, and in no particular order, my top choices would be Knight/Swift, Roehl, Schneider, and CFI, but I'm really not picky as I learned from here that the name on the door doesn't matter too much. I'll see who bites and go from there.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Joshua F.'s Comment
member avatar

Following along with you. I’m in a very similar boat as you. Just filled the form out but as it stands now swift is at the top of my list. Good luck with your search and can’t wait to follow along

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the replies! Hope this doesn't post twice, I tried once and it didn't take, so attempt two (operator error I'm sure, not very tech-savvy!)

I have been planning on going company-sponsored for so long after reading of its benefits here, just wanted to make sure that was still the right call for my circumstances. I will continue on that plan then. Anne, it's been even longer for my reader-status, I forgot I made an account 5 years ago until I started the High Road awhile back. As circumstances changed I stopped, so now it is time to reset it and restart.

When it's time, I'll use the link here to apply. In general, and in no particular order, my top choices would be Knight/Swift, Roehl, Schneider, and CFI, but I'm really not picky as I learned from here that the name on the door doesn't matter too much. I'll see who bites and go from there.

Hahahaha, Sandman!

So many folks on here, from your neck of the woods, for sure.

Post THRICE, if you choose! Wow, you've been lurking longer than I ???

From me, YW anytime. Most welcome, good sir! Sadly, contrary to Kearsey's advice... at this time, Crete sure isn't training. So many ups & downs with the who is & isn't since the ELDT mandate on 02/07/2022 . Your list looks good, though!

You MAY want to look into the ELDT, in case you decide to venture from your initial plans of company sponsored training. ELDT Q's and A's. (Wonder what happened to John, anyway?!?)

That's another sure reason, to go company sponsored~!!!

Surely, start here: Apply For Paid CDL Training, and go forthwith!

So much to read, study, ask and learn .. Its why this place IS!

Stop in soon, and ...Welcome 'back!~'

~ Anne & Tom ~

ps: Being in and around Chi'Town / Chicagoland, however you slice it; look at BobcatBob ... he's an LTL driver with ODFL (Old Dominion) out of your area... That's always an 'option' ..if you'd care to do the 'dock to driver' program. Banks and Delco Dave took that route, as well.

pps: Check into some posts by Bird One ... You'll be impressed, to see what you can work UP to!! Bird One !

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Sandman J's Comment
member avatar

Following along with you. I’m in a very similar boat as you. Just filled the form out but as it stands now swift is at the top of my list. Good luck with your search and can’t wait to follow along

Good luck to you as well, Joshua. You'll probably be a bit ahead of me timewise so I look forward to seeing the path you go down. I've been through your town a time or two when my wife's daughter was stationed in El Centro.

Anne, I quickly figured out my mistake...I didn't see my first post because I wasn't thinking it had to clear moderation before I'd see it! Hopefully I remember now. Yep, I've read much from the LTL crew in here. Since I want to venture that way after some OTR time, that was my concern with having the restriction. If I go company-sponsored and get the restriction, maybe those LTL outfits would be willing to train me to get that removed if I come in with OTR experience, if they're still running Manuals. I've heard/read manual is a very different beast in a semi tractor, but I love driving stick in my personal vehicles...all of mine have had three pedals. I'd love to learn how to do it in a commercial vehicle. My thought was going through the community college would be better than a private school, but I definitely don't discount what Kearsey said.

Thanks.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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