Any True OTR Companies??

Topic 32346 | Page 1

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Nathan S.'s Comment
member avatar

I’ve been trucking for about 13 months and looking to move on from the starter company I’m with. The problem I’m running into is everyone runs regional , dedicated, or an abbreviated OTR program. I actually want the chance to get long haul loads every now and again. Not being shoe horned into 500 mile runs everyday. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Are you still at CFI?

Nathan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah…for the moment haha

Are you still at CFI?

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Have you spoken to your dispatch/drive manager/fleet manager about your concerns, worked with them? Keep in mind OTR doesn’t always mean “I get to run coast to coast every week”. There’s a lot of freight out there that has to be moved and often times a shortage of drivers in a specific area to move it.

Yeah…for the moment haha

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Are you still at CFI?

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OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Nathan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Multiple times but it’s way more than that. My current company is a shell of itself from when I started a year ago.

I also fully understand every trip isn’t going to be 1800 miles. But I’m sick of 400-500 mile runs in the Midwest.

Have you spoken to your dispatch/drive manager/fleet manager about your concerns, worked with them? Keep in mind OTR doesn’t always mean “I get to run coast to coast every week”. There’s a lot of freight out there that has to be moved and often times a shortage of drivers in a specific area to move it.

double-quotes-start.png

Yeah…for the moment haha

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Are you still at CFI?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Moe's Comment
member avatar

How is CFI a former shell of itself? Just curious, I see them running all the time all over the place, West Coast (where I live) up and down the five , 80 etc, to the Midwest. What has changed in the last year?

To be blunt with you, the freight market is really a whack right now due to various factors (economic, policy, supply chain woes still lingering from 2020). They are giving you work I mean. I can run 560 to 600 in a single day (maybe a day and half if a live load and delayed) that aggregate adds up to pretty good weekly miles….if you run it hard….just saying

Multiple times but it’s way more than that. My current company is a shell of itself from when I started a year ago.

I also fully understand every trip isn’t going to be 1800 miles. But I’m sick of 400-500 mile runs in the Midwest.

double-quotes-start.png

Have you spoken to your dispatch/drive manager/fleet manager about your concerns, worked with them? Keep in mind OTR doesn’t always mean “I get to run coast to coast every week”. There’s a lot of freight out there that has to be moved and often times a shortage of drivers in a specific area to move it.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Yeah…for the moment haha

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Are you still at CFI?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

It's a misconception that OTR means coast to coast loads. It means your driving area is wider, not necessarily long loads. To qualify as an experienced OTR driver, my companies considers someone who has driven more than 6 states on a regular basis. I have had months where my average load was 480 miles.

The longer loads are saved for teams. And in this economy, even teaming I was given some rather short loads.

Another issue is how often you go home. 9ne member here complained they were stuck in the Northeast, yet wanted to get home to Boston every 2 weeks. That won't happen if you are running to California

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Nathan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Not breaking 2,000 miles a week, sitting for hours waiting to be dispatched (4-7 regularly) No more quarterly bonuses, no fuel bonus, .47 cpm $200 week for benefits. Should I go on?

How is CFI a former shell of itself? Just curious, I see them running all the time all over the place, West Coast (where I live) up and down the five , 80 etc, to the Midwest. What has changed in the last year?

To be blunt with you, the freight market is really a whack right now due to various factors (economic, policy, supply chain woes still lingering from 2020). They are giving you work I mean. I can run 560 to 600 in a single day (maybe a day and half if a live load and delayed) that aggregate adds up to pretty good weekly miles….if you run it hard….just saying

double-quotes-start.png

Multiple times but it’s way more than that. My current company is a shell of itself from when I started a year ago.

I also fully understand every trip isn’t going to be 1800 miles. But I’m sick of 400-500 mile runs in the Midwest.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Have you spoken to your dispatch/drive manager/fleet manager about your concerns, worked with them? Keep in mind OTR doesn’t always mean “I get to run coast to coast every week”. There’s a lot of freight out there that has to be moved and often times a shortage of drivers in a specific area to move it.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Yeah…for the moment haha

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Are you still at CFI?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Nathan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh and since it’s zip to zip mileage more than a handful of times I’m dispatched with no pay to DH to a load. Not even a couple bucks to drop and hook.

I’m not trying to knit pick but start adding up the ****ty pay and lack of basic compensation that numerous other companies offer it’s time to move on.

I was just looking for some real life recommendations not a CFI debate. It’s a great starter company and they do treat drivers with respect but that’s where it ends.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Tractor Man on here went to Danny Herman for dry van. He usually has longer loads and shorter ones.

Check them out.

The economy is changing though. My company slowed down on hiring and has been shifting trucks out of certain areas for better freight.

I don't understand your comment that you are getting paid for dead head though.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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