Please Give Me Feedback On My Shifting (video)

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N P.'s Comment
member avatar

Are you double clutching or floating gears?

As for the rhythm...there was one goofy little "hack" or trick that really brought it all home for me.... When I was in CDL school I had a hell of a time getting in sync with the rhythm double clutching. For some reason it was just one thing I could not get right or keep right.. Finally one day my instructor pulled out his phone and he said "look, this is going to sound funny.. but just give it a shot because it works" then he proceeded to play The Addams Family opening theme song... once the song started playing he had me pay particular attention to the rhythm of the "Snap---snap" part. The first "Snap" is the moment you're clutching out of gear, and the second "snap" is the moment you're clutching back into gear. Like clockwork, I finally got the rhythm and it never left. To this day I still hear that damn song in my head any time I'm consciously shifting.

(A couple things to note for context.. 1: you will only be listening to the first 15-ish seconds of this song, where you have a combination of the instrumental "dun-nu-nu-nu" followed by the "snap---snap"... 2: I'm assuming you generally do understand double clutching already but its worth mentioning anyway-- when you double clutch you are not slamming the clutch to the floor or even relatively close, rather you're merely teasing it, playing "hard to get" so-to-say only giving er a couple inches of penetration). whether you're floating or clutching the rhythm is the same and that should help if you don't quite have that dialed in.

As for shifting the lower gears, depending on your weight you really should have no problem starting out in 3rd. At high RPMs shift slower and at low RPMs shift faster. When you miss a gear or are trying to figure out what gear you need to be in, a good rule of thumb is to add the numbers together on your speedometer to find the gear... ex: 15 MPH (1+5=6th) or 45 MPH (4+5= 9th) etc..

The Automatic-Transmission Pandemic infecting our highways scares the hell outa me, I can't believe how many long-haul companies are changing their fleets to 100% autos. I've occasionally driven an auto for 1-2 day hauls but Its never been a comfortable experience in any way, especially with liquid bulk tankers... most vicious surge hits ive ever experienced!

It's been grinding my gears that I learned to drive a truck in a standard, but have only driven auto since.

No trucks were available the other night, so I got to drive a rare 10 speed.

I set up my camera so I can get feedback.. I included my worst moments hoping to get ideas for improvement.

Here's the video.. please offer feedback on how I can improve my shifting. Like timing, rhythm, etc.

Timing? Rhythm?

Here is the video. I annotated and narrated my thought process to make it easier to critique

https://youtu.be/-4Kn_qBSa9g

Thank you

I had the most trouble in the lower gears. It seemed like the truck got up to speed quickly (ie.. 15 mph), and the truck liked when I threw it into 6

Thank you in advance

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

John G.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you. I can't double clutch at all but I can float them ok. If I make it through my route tonight, I'll post a video. I have a GoPro that will record better than my phone. I discovered, like yall said, you have to go fast through the first gears. It reminds me of playing an instrument, my wrist moves fast.

Do you have to use the clutch when you start from a stop?

I've been able to float into gear 4 or 3 while coasting, but when stopped, I have to reset completely, by pushing the clutch all the way in

Are you double clutching or floating gears?

As for the rhythm...there was one goofy little "hack" or trick that really brought it all home for me.... When I was in CDL school I had a hell of a time getting in sync with the rhythm double clutching. For some reason it was just one thing I could not get right or keep right.. Finally one day my instructor pulled out his phone and he said "look, this is going to sound funny.. but just give it a shot because it works" then he proceeded to play The Addams Family opening theme song... once the song started playing he had me pay particular attention to the rhythm of the "Snap---snap" part. The first "Snap" is the moment you're clutching out of gear, and the second "snap" is the moment you're clutching back into gear. Like clockwork, I finally got the rhythm and it never left. To this day I still hear that damn song in my head any time I'm consciously shifting.

(A couple things to note for context.. 1: you will only be listening to the first 15-ish seconds of this song, where you have a combination of the instrumental "dun-nu-nu-nu" followed by the "snap---snap"... 2: I'm assuming you generally do understand double clutching already but its worth mentioning anyway-- when you double clutch you are not slamming the clutch to the floor or even relatively close, rather you're merely teasing it, playing "hard to get" so-to-say only giving er a couple inches of penetration). whether you're floating or clutching the rhythm is the same and that should help if you don't quite have that dialed in.

As for shifting the lower gears, depending on your weight you really should have no problem starting out in 3rd. At high RPMs shift slower and at low RPMs shift faster. When you miss a gear or are trying to figure out what gear you need to be in, a good rule of thumb is to add the numbers together on your speedometer to find the gear... ex: 15 MPH (1+5=6th) or 45 MPH (4+5= 9th) etc..

The Automatic-Transmission Pandemic infecting our highways scares the hell outa me, I can't believe how many long-haul companies are changing their fleets to 100% autos. I've occasionally driven an auto for 1-2 day hauls but Its never been a comfortable experience in any way, especially with liquid bulk tankers... most vicious surge hits ive ever experienced!

double-quotes-start.png

It's been grinding my gears that I learned to drive a truck in a standard, but have only driven auto since.

No trucks were available the other night, so I got to drive a rare 10 speed.

I set up my camera so I can get feedback.. I included my worst moments hoping to get ideas for improvement.

Here's the video.. please offer feedback on how I can improve my shifting. Like timing, rhythm, etc.

Timing? Rhythm?

Here is the video. I annotated and narrated my thought process to make it easier to critique

https://youtu.be/-4Kn_qBSa9g

Thank you

I had the most trouble in the lower gears. It seemed like the truck got up to speed quickly (ie.. 15 mph), and the truck liked when I threw it into 6

Thank you in advance

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Floating Gears:

An expression used to describe someone who is shifting gears without using the clutch at all. Drivers are taught to "Double Clutch" or press and release the clutch twice for each gear shift. If you're floating gears it means you're simply shifting without using the clutch at all.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

John G.'s Comment
member avatar

Also how would you approach a gas station or a parking lot where you would drive about 5 mph? I am usually in a high gear coming from a 45 mph road

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

No such thing as "I can't double clutch". You need practice which will take many repetitions, just like backing up a truck and trailer. Nobody starts off as being good at it.

For slowing down, it's a combination of brake pedal and progressive down shifting. Always have it in a gear with no coasting in neutral.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

N P.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you. I can't double clutch at all but I can float them ok. If I make it through my route tonight, I'll post a video. I have a GoPro that will record better than my phone. I discovered, like yall said, you have to go fast through the first gears. It reminds me of playing an instrument, my wrist moves fast.

If you're able to learn double clutching you will have a lot better feel for things, and tbh it is something you should be able to do at least somewhat. It seems a hell of a lot more complicated than it actually is, it just takes a little practice. This video might be a good reference to start with.. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CosP6aPzftQ

Do you have to use the clutch when you start from a stop?

Definitely. Foot through the floor when you're taking off from a stop. With the clutch fully engaged you will engage the clutch-brake and will be able to get right into gear.

Also how would you approach a gas station or a parking lot where you would drive about 5 mph? I am usually in a high gear coming from a 45 mph road

Its best to be at the high end of a lower gear, vs. being at the low end of a high gear when you are going into parking lots since you have more control at higher RPMs. When I can I try to slow down as much as possible with my engine before using my brakes.. personally, I usually engine brake to slow down, slip out of gear, rev to about 1700 and slip down into the next gear.. repeating this until I get to 4th or 5th to pull in.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar
Definitely. Foot through the floor when you're taking off from a stop. With the clutch fully engaged you will engage the clutch-brake and will be able to get right into gear.

That's why shops are replacing clutch brakes every two weeks. The only time I put the pedal to the floor is putting the truck in gear for the first time after starting the engine, or going from reverse to forward or vice versa. Coming to a stop while driving, you can slip it into gear every time without having to engage the clutch brake. Gotta synchronize better.

personally, I usually engine brake to slow down, slip out of gear, rev to about 1700 and slip down into the next gear

Man, 1700 seems high, with our Pete's, the shop will literally call us if we rev them over 1500.

John G.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Definitely. Foot through the floor when you're taking off from a stop. With the clutch fully engaged you will engage the clutch-brake and will be able to get right into gear.

double-quotes-end.png

That's why shops are replacing clutch brakes every two weeks. The only time I put the pedal to the floor is putting the truck in gear for the first time after starting the engine, or going from reverse to forward or vice versa. Coming to a stop while driving, you can slip it into gear every time without having to engage the clutch brake. Gotta synchronize better.

double-quotes-start.png

personally, I usually engine brake to slow down, slip out of gear, rev to about 1700 and slip down into the next gear

double-quotes-end.png

Man, 1700 seems high, with our Pete's, the shop will literally call us if we rev them over 1500.

What is the technique for slipping it into gear? I've been able to get it into 2 a few times while creeping at 4 mph, by giving it a small rev.

Here is my newest video- this shifter felt very stiff compared to the one I use at work. The one at work will slide into gear easier, this one made it more difficult. Note the speedometer isn't accurate till I stop the second time ( it's noted in video)

https://youtu.be/OR_3qg-q0m4

Give me feedback

andhe78's Comment
member avatar
What is the technique for slipping it into gear? I've been able to get it into 2 a few times while creeping at 4 mph, by giving it a small rev.

Ok, my worst muscle memory problem was pushing the clutch to floor. In my reply, I'm not even talking about floating. So, I'm coming up to a stop, shifted down to let's say fifth. I roll up until just before lugging, then push in the clutch part-way and roll the few feet to a stop. Most common thing I see (even in very experienced guys) is putting the clutch to the floor while rolling-once you've actually stopped, then it's fine. So, I'm rolling in fifth, clutch partially depressed and I come to a stop-believe it or not, I'll usually put it into my starting gear without pressing the clutch in any further, it's the synchronization thing, at a full stop, at the right moment, I can drop it into second without having to engage the clutch brake. Now I'm ready to take right off without having to bring the clutch out of the full depress. Also great if a light turns green, I'm rolling up in fifth, and have the start of a double clutch , light turns, depending on my road speed and weight, I can just complete a double clutch into second, third, or fourth. I've actually watched guys try to do this with a fully depressed clutch, and it's rough. To break my muscle memory problem, I literally put the clutch on the floor as rarely as possible.

Hard for me to pick up problems on a video (nice vid, btw), but fourth sure does have your number. A lot of shifting for me was just practice, hundreds of reps every shift as a city driver, tinkering with techniques until finding what worked.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

John G.'s Comment
member avatar

Haha yeah 4 was a *****!

Thank you, gonna try this technique tonight. Should have another video!

double-quotes-start.png

What is the technique for slipping it into gear? I've been able to get it into 2 a few times while creeping at 4 mph, by giving it a small rev.

double-quotes-end.png

Ok, my worst muscle memory problem was pushing the clutch to floor. In my reply, I'm not even talking about floating. So, I'm coming up to a stop, shifted down to let's say fifth. I roll up until just before lugging, then push in the clutch part-way and roll the few feet to a stop. Most common thing I see (even in very experienced guys) is putting the clutch to the floor while rolling-once you've actually stopped, then it's fine. So, I'm rolling in fifth, clutch partially depressed and I come to a stop-believe it or not, I'll usually put it into my starting gear without pressing the clutch in any further, it's the synchronization thing, at a full stop, at the right moment, I can drop it into second without having to engage the clutch brake. Now I'm ready to take right off without having to bring the clutch out of the full depress. Also great if a light turns green, I'm rolling up in fifth, and have the start of a double clutch , light turns, depending on my road speed and weight, I can just complete a double clutch into second, third, or fourth. I've actually watched guys try to do this with a fully depressed clutch, and it's rough. To break my muscle memory problem, I literally put the clutch on the floor as rarely as possible.

Hard for me to pick up problems on a video (nice vid, btw), but fourth sure does have your number. A lot of shifting for me was just practice, hundreds of reps every shift as a city driver, tinkering with techniques until finding what worked.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

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