Are There Any New Truck Drivers (licensed In The Past Two Years) Here That Went With A Paid CDL Trucking Company?

Topic 32568 | Page 1

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Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

NOTE: I’m posting this post (below) for a friend who is having trouble trying to get an account setup on TT, who is interested in becoming a truck driver.

"Since there is a big demand for new truck drivers right now, I was wondering if you have been to one of the paid CDL trucking companies (in the past two years), as I was curious to learn if you learned on an automatic or manual transmission truck? Do you have an option to learn on a manual truck or do they by default teach you to drive and get licensed on an automatic truck nowadays? Prior to the pandemic and the truck driver shortage, (I had always heard) it seemed to be the norm to learn on a manual transmission truck (at these trucking companies) and most fleet trucks were manual transmission trucks. Nowadays (I am now hearing) most large/major trucking companies are replacing their fleet trucks with automatic transmission trucks."

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Klutch's Comment
member avatar

I did the paid CDL training program with Schneider a year ago. All training is done with autos, no option for manual. All trucks in the fleet are auto.

NOTE: I’m posting this post (below) for a friend who is having trouble trying to get an account setup on TT, who is interested in becoming a truck driver.

"Since there is a big demand for new truck drivers right now, I was wondering if you have been to one of the paid CDL trucking companies (in the past two years), as I was curious to learn if you learned on an automatic or manual transmission truck? Do you have an option to learn on a manual truck or do they by default teach you to drive and get licensed on an automatic truck nowadays? Prior to the pandemic and the truck driver shortage, (I had always heard) it seemed to be the norm to learn on a manual transmission truck (at these trucking companies) and most fleet trucks were manual transmission trucks. Nowadays (I am now hearing) most large/major trucking companies are replacing their fleet trucks with automatic transmission trucks."

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Ryan B.'s Comment
member avatar

NOTE: I’m posting this post (below) for a friend who is having trouble trying to get an account setup on TT, who is interested in becoming a truck driver.

"Since there is a big demand for new truck drivers right now, I was wondering if you have been to one of the paid CDL trucking companies (in the past two years), as I was curious to learn if you learned on an automatic or manual transmission truck? Do you have an option to learn on a manual truck or do they by default teach you to drive and get licensed on an automatic truck nowadays? Prior to the pandemic and the truck driver shortage, (I had always heard) it seemed to be the norm to learn on a manual transmission truck (at these trucking companies) and most fleet trucks were manual transmission trucks. Nowadays (I am now hearing) most large/major trucking companies are replacing their fleet trucks with automatic transmission trucks."

Each and every training company is different. Some train on manuals and some train on autos. There is no option to choose, as far as I am aware. You get trained on the equipment that the company uses.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

First it is a myth that there is a driver shortage. Freight is slowing and companies are slowing their hiring now. Predictions for freight over the next year have looked dismal.

Most training companies have turned over to autos. Truck manufacturing companies had production rates of manuals of about 6% before covid.

My mega carrier began turning over in 2017. Companies do not actually consider themselves a "training school" for you to take a CDL anywhere. They are training you to work for them, therefore they want to train you on their equipment.

I have always believed it best to train at the company and if you get the restriction then eventually you can test later if you change jobs. A new exam to remove the restriction would be so much easier and less stressful when you have a year or more.of experience driving. The shifting would be easier to learn and test when you are confident with everything else about driving.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

I did the paid CDL training program with Schneider a year ago. All training is done with autos, no option for manual. All trucks in the fleet are auto.

double-quotes-start.png

NOTE: I’m posting this post (below) for a friend who is having trouble trying to get an account setup on TT, who is interested in becoming a truck driver.

"Since there is a big demand for new truck drivers right now, I was wondering if you have been to one of the paid CDL trucking companies (in the past two years), as I was curious to learn if you learned on an automatic or manual transmission truck? Do you have an option to learn on a manual truck or do they by default teach you to drive and get licensed on an automatic truck nowadays? Prior to the pandemic and the truck driver shortage, (I had always heard) it seemed to be the norm to learn on a manual transmission truck (at these trucking companies) and most fleet trucks were manual transmission trucks. Nowadays (I am now hearing) most large/major trucking companies are replacing their fleet trucks with automatic transmission trucks."

double-quotes-end.png

Greetings Klutch,

Thank you very much for reply back to my friend’s questions. I will send him your response in an email. What you have shared will be a big help.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

NOTE: I’m posting this post (below) for a friend who is having trouble trying to get an account setup on TT, who is interested in becoming a truck driver.

"Since there is a big demand for new truck drivers right now, I was wondering if you have been to one of the paid CDL trucking companies (in the past two years), as I was curious to learn if you learned on an automatic or manual transmission truck? Do you have an option to learn on a manual truck or do they by default teach you to drive and get licensed on an automatic truck nowadays? Prior to the pandemic and the truck driver shortage, (I had always heard) it seemed to be the norm to learn on a manual transmission truck (at these trucking companies) and most fleet trucks were manual transmission trucks. Nowadays (I am now hearing) most large/major trucking companies are replacing their fleet trucks with automatic transmission trucks."

double-quotes-end.png

Each and every training company is different. Some train on manuals and some train on autos. There is no option to choose, as far as I am aware. You get trained on the equipment that the company uses.

Hello Ryan B.,

Thank you very much for reply back to my friend’s questions. I will send him your response in an email.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Nick S.'s Comment
member avatar

First it is a myth that there is a driver shortage. Freight is slowing and companies are slowing their hiring now. Predictions for freight over the next year have looked dismal.

Most training companies have turned over to autos. Truck manufacturing companies had production rates of manuals of about 6% before covid.

My mega carrier began turning over in 2017. Companies do not actually consider themselves a "training school" for you to take a CDL anywhere. They are training you to work for them, therefore they want to train you on their equipment.

I have always believed it best to train at the company and if you get the restriction then eventually you can test later if you change jobs. A new exam to remove the restriction would be so much easier and less stressful when you have a year or more.of experience driving. The shifting would be easier to learn and test when you are confident with everything else about driving.

Hello Truckin Along With Kearsey,

Thank you very much for reply back to my friend’s questions. I will send him your response in an email.

Since my friend and I are new to the truck driver scene, all I can say, here in Southern California, we see many trucking companies looking for licensed drivers (each week), along with a lot of trucking companies looking to train new drivers. Maybe the truck driver shortages we have been hearing about is regional. Yet going by all of those ads we keep seeing, it seems like there is a truck driver shortage here where we are.

On the behalf of my friend, thank you for your help, it is greatly appreciated.

Kind Regards,

Nick S.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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