Talking Shop: The Just Talking Thread

Topic 33350 | Page 11

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Pelican's Comment
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My company has said they prefer us to use recap but I had two days where I got back 5:45 and 6:45 respectively. I think I'm gonna start doing 34 hour resets more. What's the best way to ask for a reset?

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How often do you guys do 34 hour resets?

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When I run out of hours and only get back 7 to 9 hours over the next two days, then I do a 34.

Laura

BK's Comment
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The best way to ask for a reset is to say Please.

If that doesn’t work, say Pretty Please.

Pelican's Comment
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That's solid advice, BK.

Sandman J's Comment
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Pelican, I know every company is different and I always do resets without asking for them, so no specific advice from me on that. But I can tell you what I do. It doesn't seem like they look at how much is remaining on my 70 when preplanning me, so I see what they give me, see what I can do, then send a message saying I can't get to this or that before doing a reset. They either pull it completely if it has to deliver on time, or they change the appointment, or they tell me do it after my reset if it's not time-sensitive. An example of the last option is scrap paper, as there's not specific scrap I'm picking up and dropping, just a set weight of scrap in a constant flow from shipper to receiver.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Maestro's Comment
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Hey Trucking Friends,

I hope everyone is well.

This is for the experienced truckers here...May I enlist your help?

Next week, I will start a new route to Rushville, Indiana and I am getting the hint that I need to go to the scales to weigh the load.

I have never done this before and have no clue.

Explain to me like I'm five on how to do this or if you have any video links to share, please do.

Any help is appreciated.

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
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Depends on which scale is nearby. Actual scale use is pretty easy if using CAT scales. Pull slowly onto the scale plated, position your steers on the forward plate, the drive axle tandems on the second plate, and the trailer tandems on the long rear plate. Those "full draft" scales will print out each of the three weights. Easy peasy. Always pull onto a scale centered left to right, and slowly (5mph or idle roll) to prevent locking or binding the plates or damaging the mech. Releasing brakes allows for natural settling of the scale and accurate weigh (see notes below on sloped approached to shorter scales).

If it is an unattended single draft or double draft (long enoug to weigh a three axle dumper in one shot, but not a full 18 wheeler) scale common with many ag locations you need a notebook Crayolas and a calculator. Pull forward slowly so JUST the steer axle is on, release brakes (or if slope approach ramp use trailer brakes to hold your spot) and let the scale settle, write down the weight displayed. Move up slowly until the steers are off and the drives only are on write down that weight. Do the same for the trailer tandems. That gives you three weights, add them together for your gross weight.

I used to pick up soy for export on a single plate full draft, had to do multiple calcs. First weigh steers (write it down) , then weigh steers and drives (write it down). Subtract the steers from the steers & drive tandems to get just the drive weight. Then pull fully forward so just the entire unit is on the single plate, write down your gross. Then pull forward to clear your drive tandems, leaving just trailer tandems on the plate, and write that down. I always tool photos of the numbers to show anyone that thought I was over. And I always confirmed at a multilateral full draft (commercial certified or CAT) scale asap.

I used the CAT scale app, made everything easy to accomplish when using a cat scale. No waiting in line inside to get tickets, they send the scale ticket to your phone.

Hope this helps.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

CAT Scale:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

Cat Scales:

A network of over 1,500 certified truck scales across the U.S. and Canada found primarily at truck stops. CAT scales are by far the most trustworthy scales out there.

In fact, CAT Scale offers an unconditional Guarantee:

“If you get an overweight fine from the state after our scale showed your legal, we will immediately check our scale. If our scale is wrong, we will reimburse you for the fine. If our scale is correct, a representative of CAT Scale Company will appear in court with the driver as a witness”

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

This probably should be its own thread, as I look at that lengthy response.

Typos? Ya, at least one: multilateral should read "multiple plate"

As far as adjusting the load to get it legal, that's a whole other can of worms. The Clinton, IA nestle plant was quite adept at loading a 40' intermodal box super heavy in the front, but legal gross weight. I once had ~37 - 38k on my drives, and they wouldn't accept my assertions that it was over. I had to haul it to the cat at the KwikTrip for a certified weigh before they rebalanced.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

BK's Comment
member avatar

0567842001693671726.jpg

This is the screen shot of my last load sent to me using the CAT Weigh My Truck app

If you don’t have the app, you will need to pull onto the scale and use your service brake pedal to stop, stabilize and then release the pedal. Make sure you are stopped dead and not rolling. As mentioned, do not set the tractor or trailer brakes as the scales are supposed to be dead level and you should not roll forward or back. If you don’t have the app, press the call button on the scale post from your driver’s window. The weigh master will probably ask you over the speaker for your truck number and then wait until you are told that your scale ticket will be available inside. Park somewhere out of the way and go pay $14 and get your ticket.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Catscale

I found this video to be very useful when scaling a load my first time. If you need help understanding sliding your tandems please make it into a separate thread to make it easier for other new drivers to find.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

The biggest things to remember with scales is DO NOT slide your tandems on the scale, and you MUST go park elsewhere to run inside for your ticket. Do not leave your truck on the scale or just ahead like you do while fueling. The places I scale at usually have an open pump so I'll pull ahead of the pump and run in or park off to the side if parking is limited and i can do so safely. If a pump is out of order parking ahead of it is a safe bet but I do not recommend parking behind it as you may get blocked in. I try to be courteous and stay out of the way of others that need fuel or a legal parking spot as I'm going to hit the restroom and grab my ticket and be gone within 5 minutes.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

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