Traffic Warning; Kicking Myself!

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Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

On my way home from work this evening, I got pulled over.

Officer: Do you know why I pulled you over tonight?

Me: I bet it's a headlight; I have more trouble with these darn headlights burning out . . . (they really do burn out a lot)

Officer: No, I stopped you because you were going a bit fast back there. Do you know what the speed limit is on Fremont Street?

Me: (panic setting in) ah . . . 30?

Officer: No, it's 25. Do you know how fast you were going?

Me: 30?

Officer: Nope, I have you clocked at 36.

Me: Oh no! Crap! Oh no! Oh my God! Oh no!

(My mind goes into a death spiral while he goes back to his squad car)

He came back with - not a ticket - but a WARNING! I wanted to jump out of the car and hug him, but then he might have had to tazer me. Actually, I got all choked up and teary and said "You have NO IDEA how grateful I am!!!", and told him of my plan to get a CDL and drive a truck. He told me to take it easy and have a good night.

And I kicked myself all the way home.

I was literally going to start calling for pre-hires NEXT WEEK. Now what is THIS going to do to me? The warning says "for exceeding the speed limit", but does not say by how much. Do I have to wait and put some time between this and calling companies?

I CAN'T BELIEVE I WAS SO CARELESS WITH SOMETHING THIS IMPORTANT!!!!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Pre-hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Pre-hires:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Deb, you're a lucky girl! The officer did you a huge favor, that warning does not show up on your DMV reports, so you are in great shape as far as that's concerned. I wouldn't even concern myself with it, and you won't need to report it to a recruiter or put it on any applications.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for that reassurance, Old School; I will sleep better tonight.

Seems like my mistakes are sometimes the best lessons I get. This certainly impressed upon me the importance of always being aware of my speed. Guess I could "pretrip" my car and check those headlights too!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Yes you are lucky. Once you have a cdl and in a big truck if you get a warning then it will show up on you Pre Screen Employment record as a warning and as of right now does cost you points cause they have not fixed it yet so that warnings give no points.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Wine Taster's Comment
member avatar

It is funny, when you get a CDL - A, you start to really obey each and every law. You start to realize that your livelihood is on the line. Do you remember back in the day when you had a beer at a friends house and then 4 hours later drove home. With a CDL you may skip the beer even though you know 4 hours is plenty of time for it to be gone with just one beer. When you have a CDL - A, you are considered to be a professional driver. You should be more aware than the average driver. You are lucky! Maybe that is a sign that trucking is going to be a good fit. Good luck in your career. Be safe. Be smart.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Roadkill (aka:Guy DeCou)'s Comment
member avatar

Bit of advice for you from a retired cop. If you EVER get pulled over and the officer asks you ,"do you know why i pulled you over"? ALWAYS say, "no officer, i have no idea." Always Make the officer explain why he pulled you over. Saying yes means you basically just admitted you knowingly committed a violation. Answering no and making the officer explain his reason for pulling you over makes him/her have to state the probable cause they needed to stop you. I admit you got off easy with a warning but if the cop wanted to be a "richard" he could have cited you for speeding AND probably cited you knowingly using a defective vehicle. Like i said, i am a retired cop and there are plenty of good guys behind the badge but there are also plenty of not so nice guys. Dont ever give up your rights by not knowing them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Whoa it's a Roadkill siting!!! Awesome! There's not nearly enough of those anymore.

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Roadkill (aka:Guy DeCou)'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah being in PSD doesnt give me a whole lot of free time these days. I test out on monday and if all goes well i will be going into phase 2 or TNT training after that. I have a pretty good trainer in the big scope of things. Ive learned a lot from him and will learn a lot more. I have to admit though i have taught him a thing ot two from what ive learned on here. Its been fun showing him how to save time using the split sleeper rule and making appointment times he didnt think we could make because of itsmile.gif

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Deb R.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the advice, Roadkill; I hope to not have to use it!

Anchorman's Comment
member avatar

Bit of advice for you from a retired cop. If you EVER get pulled over and the officer asks you ,"do you know why i pulled you over"? ALWAYS say, "no officer, i have no idea." Always Make the officer explain why he pulled you over. Saying yes means you basically just admitted you knowingly committed a violation. Answering no and making the officer explain his reason for pulling you over makes him/her have to state the probable cause they needed to stop you. I admit you got off easy with a warning but if the cop wanted to be a "richard" he could have cited you for speeding AND probably cited you knowingly using a defective vehicle. Like i said, i am a retired cop and there are plenty of good guys behind the badge but there are also plenty of not so nice guys. Dont ever give up your rights by not knowing them.

Your advice reminds me of the police scene with Jim Carrey in Liar Liar. rofl-1.gif

Cop: You know why I pulled you over?

Fletcher: Depends on how long you were following me!

Cop: Why don't we just take it from the top?

Fletcher: Here goes: I sped. I followed too closely. I ran a stop sign. I almost hit a Chevy. I sped some more. I failed to yield at a crosswalk. I changed lanes at the intersection. I changed lanes without signaling while running a red light and *speeding*!

Cop: Is that all?

Fletcher: No... I have unpaid parking tickets.

[groans]

Fletcher: ... be gentle.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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