Oh Oh, Look What I Got In The Mail!

Topic 4571 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Looks like I did it! Top tier driver status!

In a company as massive as Prime, I am very proud of myself. Prime has the largest refrigerated fleet in the nation and I truly can't believe I was one of the top last month. Hard work pays off! I had a really bad week this week and this made it into a good week. I'll tell you about that in a few days but for now its celebrating for me.

Prime trucking employee of the month letter

And as a side bonus, I got my first Military trailer yesterday. Check it out! Sexy!

Prime truck pulling military trailer

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Yeah buddy! Congrats to you! Love the color of your truck btw, one of those maroon ones, right? Also, was that a Shaffer trailer you parked next to?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah buddy! Congrats to you! Love the color of your truck btw, one of those maroon ones, right? Also, was that a Shaffer trailer you parked next to?

Thank you sir! Yep maroon, or as I like to call it, black cherry. And that is in fact a Shaffer next to me. Poor guy had my reefer and APU blasting his ear drums all night.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

James R.'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel prime is one of the companies i'm looking at trying to get with after school....maybe you'll do me a favor and train me good-luck-2.gif

I'm particularly interested in how well you understand the mechanics behind fuel efficiency, and i want a trainer that is A+++ since i want to stay in this business for the long run.

Jolie R.'s Comment
member avatar

Congratulations Daniel! I love following your threads and I love to hear when someone who is generous with their time and knowledge has good things happen to them! dancing-dog.gif

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

no chin's Comment
member avatar

Daniel prime is one of the companies i'm looking at trying to get with after school....maybe you'll do me a favor and train me good-luck-2.gif

I'm particularly interested in how well you understand the mechanics behind fuel efficiency, and i want a trainer that is A+++ since i want to stay in this business for the long run.

daniel no longer trains.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Daniel prime is one of the companies i'm looking at trying to get with after school....maybe you'll do me a favor and train me good-luck-2.gif

I'm particularly interested in how well you understand the mechanics behind fuel efficiency, and i want a trainer that is A+++ since i want to stay in this business for the long run.

It's not hard to learn the basics. You can ask your fuel department and they can give you pointers.

Now if you want to get in depth in feel economy it can get very technical. Like did you know for every rpm or rotation of the engine that each fuel injector fires 6000 times? Did you know that for every 1 mph that you slow down you save a tenth of a gallon of fuel? Slow down 5 mph and that's an extra .50 you save. Half mile per gallon is huge.

Did you know it's a myth the you get the same fuel milage at 70 as you can at 60 mph? Duh. The engine turns faster and it require more fuel to get up to 70 and even more fuel to maintain that speed.

Did ya know having the windows down while the truck is moving you will loose fuel milage?

People that are serious about fuel milage even measure air flow between the cab and the trailer and behind the trailer while it's moving. That is how the trailer tail came into being. Side skirts also to help keep the air flow on the outside of the trailer instead of underneath it hitting the trailer tandems and causing drag. Seriously. It's that detailed.

If you learn how to save fuel and work really hard at it will become 2nd nature. Do to my driving and the weights I pull my average is right about 8.8 mph. If you look at the picture I posted of the trailer I haul you will notice the huge gaps between the cab and first trailer and the gap between the first trailer and the second. Those gaps hurt fuel milage. If not for those I could be well over 9 mph.

Believe it or not there are some drivers that actually get over 10 mpg. It's the way they drive and custom equipment that they own.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

James R.'s Comment
member avatar

I know he doesn't train, i'm begging for an exception rofl-2.gif

And all of that info is really great and the exact kind of knowledge and details i'm looking for. As for the custom equipment, can i do anything like that as a company driver?

The only thing i know so far about fuel economy is what my physics teacher said about air resistance being exponential as you move faster. So what you said about the difference between 60 and 70 is spot on, the air resistance between the two may very well have doubled(i don't remember the equations). I know that a lot of energy can be lost in the transmission, and since i've never even driven a manual i don't know where to begin on driving one in an efficient manner.

That sucks about the windows, i like letting the wind flap over my head.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

Looks like I did it! Top tier driver status!

That's awesome! Great job Daniel!!

Jolie R.'s Comment
member avatar

It's not hard to learn the basics. You can ask your fuel department and they can give you pointers.

Now if you want to get in depth in feel economy it can get very technical. Like did you know for every rpm or rotation of the engine that each fuel injector fires 6000 times? Did you know that for every 1 mph that you slow down you save a tenth of a gallon of fuel? Slow down 5 mph and that's an extra .50 you save. Half mile per gallon is huge.

Did you know it's a myth the you get the same fuel milage at 70 as you can at 60 mph? Duh. The engine turns faster and it require more fuel to get up to 70 and even more fuel to maintain that speed.

Did ya know having the windows down while the truck is moving you will loose fuel milage?

People that are serious about fuel milage even measure air flow between the cab and the trailer and behind the trailer while it's moving. That is how the trailer tail came into being. Side skirts also to help keep the air flow on the outside of the trailer instead of underneath it hitting the trailer tandems and causing drag. Seriously. It's that detailed.

If you learn how to save fuel and work really hard at it will become 2nd nature. Do to my driving and the weights I pull my average is right about 8.8 mph. If you look at the picture I posted of the trailer I haul you will notice the huge gaps between the cab and first trailer and the gap between the first trailer and the second. Those gaps hurt fuel milage. If not for those I could be well over 9 mph.

Believe it or not there are some drivers that actually get over 10 mpg. It's the way they drive and custom equipment that they own.

I always wondered why some of the trucks I have seen driving down I-75 had those skirts on the side, and now I know! I have also seen a few that have some strange contraption off of the end of the trailer and I am assuming that is for the same reason. Are these items drivers buy themselves or do companies provide them if requested?

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More