Propane Stove: DOT Restriction?

Topic 4878 | Page 1

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Cleft_Asunder's Comment
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I like to cook my food and I haven't eaten fast food in over 10 years. I'm wondering if I can get away with having small propane tanks in the cab, and using them only outside the cab. Is this based on company policy and if you're hauling hazmat?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

David's Comment
member avatar

I like to cook my food and I haven't eaten fast food in over 10 years. I'm wondering if I can get away with having small propane tanks in the cab, and using them only outside the cab. Is this based on company policy and if you're hauling hazmat?

I'm not completely sure on it being regulated, but I've seen drivers with little wabachi grills. Maybe charcoal or propane I'm not sure. I think it may be more of a company policie. I know a lot of companies put power units in trucks now so you can have an electric cooker.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

MRC's Comment
member avatar

Electric, Hell No! If you can grill it, do it. There's nothing better than a fresh meal of the barbeque. I plan on doing the same thing when I get going. The only thing I can think of is, tunnels. I know that campers having the 30lbers strapped to the camper have to bypass them.. I would guess the person that will know is Guyjax, He's the Reg Miester. Good Luck, MRC

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
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There really is not regulation against it and they sell small propane stones in the truck stops with small bottles. Now you will not be able to carry propane bottles the size of the ones at home.

Now let's look the reality of it on the road. You may start out doing it once you go solo but not during your training simply won't be room for your unnecessary stuff since your trainer will have more than enough crap taking up space.

Once your solo it would be great if you could do it all the time but there will be days, especially starting out solo, that all you want to do is fall into bed and sleep.

Preparing the food. Setting up the grill. Cooking the food. And then the cleanup. Not sure I would be willing to do that day in and day out. What about if it's raining or during the middle of winter? Cook inside the truck? Better hope you like what you are cooking cause you will still smell it weeks later.

In closing I say do it as a treat every once in away but does not seems practical to do everyday.

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
member avatar

Electric, Hell No! If you can grill it, do it. There's nothing better than a fresh meal of the barbeque. I plan on doing the same thing when I get going. The only thing I can think of is, tunnels. I know that campers having the 30lbers strapped to the camper have to bypass them.. I would guess the person that will know is Guyjax, He's the Reg Miester. Good Luck, MRC

None. I hardly know the regulations except the ones that concern me personally that effect the freight that I am hauling at the time. For everything else I simple do a search on Google for keywords or keyword parsing. When looking for regulations my search always starts with "FMCSA" so the search string will make sure to check the fmcsa Dot websites. After that I use and many words I can to narrow do the search and will include the question sometimes in the search cause someone some where has asked the same one in the past and the Internet, the live entity that it is, always remembers. Most regs can be found in about 3 to 5 Seconds.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
MRC's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Electric, Hell No! If you can grill it, do it. There's nothing better than a fresh meal of the barbeque. I plan on doing the same thing when I get going. The only thing I can think of is, tunnels. I know that campers having the 30lbers strapped to the camper have to bypass them.. I would guess the person that will know is Guyjax, He's the Reg Miester. Good Luck, MRC

double-quotes-end.png

None. I hardly know the regulations except the ones that concern me personally that effect the freight that I am hauling at the time. For everything else I simple do a search on Google for keywords or keyword parsing. When looking for regulations my search always starts with "FMCSA" so the search string will make sure to check the fmcsa Dot websites. After that I use and many words I can to narrow do the search and will include the question sometimes in the search cause someone some where has asked the same one in the past and the Internet, the live entity that it is, always remembers. Most regs can be found in about 3 to 5 Seconds.

I knew that you would have the answer Guyjax, I really didn't mean every day but it will definitely be a part of the 36 recharge. I have the regs right in favorites and didn't even think of that, search, duh! Take care, P.S. I remember Arrow

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

Having a grill is great, and I'll probably get one in the future. What I need is a small propane stove like you said so that I can cook stuff on a small iron skillet and bring things to a boil in a pot. If there's a fridge in my truck, I'll be able to buy raw meat and cook a meal that will last a couple days. For example, chicken and vegetables.

I don't know how it would be in really cold weather. I will figure things out. But I would never cook inside the truck.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

Man, you can simmer some good quality beef in a crock pot, add vegetables, and drive the truck, and a few hours later you got food for 2 days. Ain't no thang.

Edward H.'s Comment
member avatar

What's for supper???? Excellent idea with very practical safety concerns. Something else for a wannabee rook such as I to figure out. Used to use a small propane ultralight camping stove when we would go to the field. Key point as mentioned in a previous post, a treat but not practical on a daily basis. Gotta get inside a truck for a show and tell sometime, can't wait for school!

edgood-luck-2.gif

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

Don't get me wrong, I will be eating out too, but at good chain restaraunts or regular ones, but not taco bell and stuff. So what kind of food do they have a truck stops? I've read it's mainly fast food.

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