Can't Decide!

Topic 4928 | Page 1

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CJ's Comment
member avatar

About to finish CDL school and have been stressing and racking my brain and doing research to figure out what company to go with. I've narrowed it to four companies but am now stuck. I want to go where I will stay for a year or even longer if possible. My companies left are TMC Transportation, Roehl Transport, Werner Transport and Maverick Transportation. Would appreciate any pros or cons you have. I understand it really comes down to what company is best for the individual but I do appreciate the input. Thanks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Daniel B.'s Comment
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I hear amazing things about TMC and Maverick. If I was to ever be a flatbedder that's where I would go. But it depends on the individual. :)

no chin's Comment
member avatar

Im going with TMC got one month of school left and i cant wait to start. love their pay and hometime

guyjax(Guy Hodges)'s Comment
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I am a bit bias but not because I drive for Werner. I just hate the cold wind. Flat beds are a more physical job for sure but when I think of all the times during the winter time that the wind howls across the landscape at 20 and 30 mph and then have to use a tarp in that and then add in 20 to 30 degree weather..... No sir. Call me a wussy if you want but do it while I am sitting in my nice warm cab not fighting the wind.

Personally I like dry van. I had better since I haul two behind the truck every day. BTW double rock. But anyway dry van I would think would be less stressful for a rookie than a flat bed. Not saying you can't learn how to secure a load or anything like that. New drivers go straight into flat bed all the time. I know enough about flatbeds that I can tell if something is not done right or coming undone and can give warning.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

CJ.....don't worry about the company's reputation but worry about things like the type of freight, equipment, home time, pay, & benefits. Also, here's something to consider.....

Some companies have several fleets to choose from. There might be different types of freight (flatbed, dry van , refrigerated), there might be different home time options (daily, weekly, monthly), and there might be several dedicated accounts to work with (Dollar General, Walmart, etc).

Roehl Transport for instance has flatbed, dry van, and refrigerated. Werner Enterprises has multiple types of freight and multiple dedicated accounts to choose from.

So flexibility might be a consideration also. Until you've done a certain job you really don't know what you'll like or dislike about it. So going with a company that gives you various options to choose from can be great. And once you're working for a company it's normally pretty easy to move between divisions. You might find some that require a certain level of experience (usually 6-12 months) but normally you can move around freely within a company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

CJ's Comment
member avatar

Thanks so much for the responses. Everyone on this site is tremendously helpful and I love it. Only trucking forum I really listen to. I'm have put a list of questions together to ask and am sure I will be ok with whatever company I choose. After all I will still be driving. 👍thanks again. I will let you know who I choose and will see ya out there.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

We've talked a lot over the years about what questions to ask recruiters but I don't have one single resource just for that topic. So that's now been added to the list. But for now, I used our search engine (it's at the top of every page of the website) and searched our website. We have forum conversations, articles, and entries in our Truck Driver's Career Guide that all cover questions you can ask recruiters. Have a browse through here and you'll pick up some good stuff:

List of questions to ask recruiters.

Hj G.'s Comment
member avatar

Your looking at the companies, but you need to ask yourself, what am I gonna be happy with. you mention TMC, ive heard from their drivers, and they are very happy, now me, I wouldn't be happy with them cause im 58yrs old. I don't bounce back like I use to when I fall off stuff. so I take it your young. might be good for you though.

ive driven reefer and dryvan , love em both. now with reefer I can haul it all. dry van im limited if I need to haul perishables. I like the challenge of driven a reefer EX. temp sensitive frieight, but sometimes they will try to overload me. dryvan is usually drop and hook , really like that.

the other companies you mention I have heard good and bad so I guess your going to ask a few more drivers a lot more questions.

I wish you luck and im sure you will pick the company that is right for you.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

CJ's Comment
member avatar

Thanks. I think I have dropped TMC even though they were at the top for me. I'm 39 and not necessarily in the best shape so I feel flatbed is not for me. Kind I have it down I Roehl and maverick now. Just going over more benefits. Maverick does not match 401K but other than deductible the insurance coverage is nice. Oh well need to focus on my cdl anyway haha. Day 2 of driving the big rig today and the instructors said we are rocking. Hope they are not just being nice.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
CJ's Comment
member avatar

Just a quick update since I'm excited. I took and passed my test today for my cdl. I officially have my cdl with tankers, double, triples and hazmat once my fingerprints come back. (Already took the test) just thrilled to have passed backing and road test (silly alley dock 🙈) anyways just thought I would pass on the update and say I start my orientation week on sept 15 and can't wait. Thanks TT this site had been a big help!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

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