The Least Stressful Job For A Rookie Driver

Topic 5046 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm sure most of you are familiar with our good friend Six-String. He landed almost the perfect the job for himself and his family right out of the gates getting his Line Haul / LTL gig. But what usually goes along with great pay, is great stress. Putting in long hours, then driving home each night. Getting back to the terminal and starting it all over again seems like massive input when your still trying to learn how to be a driver.

I have great admiration for this man taking on so much.

His experience has me wondering if I should aim a little lower down on the career ladder to have a little less clock stress. Then move up to that LTL - L/H gig after my 1 year baptism by fire.

What would be the ratings of stress working against the clock in Rookie driving careers? I know the job is HOS based, so there is always going to be SOME clock stress, but it looks like these Line Haul drivers keep very tight schedules.

So how would the following be rated in terms of stress of getting there on time?

LTL P$D LTL L/H LTL Regional Bag driver ( week out / home weekends )

TL / LTL Regional dedicated TL / LTL Regional

TL OTR

I'm sure I have missed some jobs in there, but I'm looking for the least stressful job to start out. Decent money - $35-40k, so I can just focus on the job at hand - learning how to drive safely / efficiently .

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

MRC's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to be the first to say "If you're CDL ,good-luck.gif you're always going to be stressed" You could try local company's, your local lumber yard, cement co. etc... BUT, the customer is going to want it his way, in this spot and at this time. They all will be stressful, if you are driving a Commercial vehicle, your under DOT control as well as driving a vehicle that is going to cause Major damage to anyone and anything in its way (which if you look at Daniel B's thread ) most people don't even think about. That being said, Good Luck and many miles in front of you!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

MRC's Comment
member avatar

Sorry AJ, Didn't mean to sound so negative. I know that you are on the docks now, if that is already pushing your buttons on noise, etc.. I'm just saying that any driving is going to bring stress, with all the rules and such. I started out in heating fuel delivery and got to meet a lot of new people, made some friends (cost of fuel, your not a favorite to see) and it was actually a low stress job.

Chris L.'s Comment
member avatar

I would say a regional route would be the least stressful, since it will keep you in a familiar area. Possibly doing the same route every week so there would be more of a routine. But never let your guard down. I used to do a regional route same thing every week it got a little boring, but I was home 2 days a week. I'm OTR now and like the adventure of it.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Kind of hard to say AJ. LTL and city would be more stressful for me. I liked being regional and love what I am doing now, (OTL). Not sure there is a lower position on the ladder though. Just depends on what you want to do and if you truly enjoy it, there will be less stress. I think you can consider moving into another division a promotion if you started somewhere you didn`t want to be and worked hard to move to where you did want to be.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

I think it would depend on what you find stressful. Myself I found a local gig that is virtually a regional route. Home almost every night and hauling freight that isn't "critical" so if I have to shut down due to weather the company doesn't give me a hard time and helps me find a hotel. Not all jobs are like that but that's another option.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

Kind of hard to say AJ. LTL and city would be more stressful for me. I liked being regional and love what I am doing now, (OTL). Not sure there is a lower position on the ladder though. Just depends on what you want to do and if you truly enjoy it, there will be less stress. I think you can consider moving into another division a promotion if you started somewhere you didn`t want to be and worked hard to move to where you did want to be.

Thanks RT ...

btw, what is OTL?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
AJ D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the input guys...

I don't think I worded this thread quite right. I have been in high stress environments most of my previous career and nothing is pushing my buttons. I know I can handle it all just fine.

I was just wanting to know , out of all the trucking jobs out there, which ones were considered more stressful than others, and just try to avoid those my first year.

I made the same post over at the TR site, and the thread got shut down I got so ****ed off at some of the smart ass comments coming from those guys. Punks hiding behind avatars are the worst !

Please excuse my French. ;) .... I'm still a little fired up about it. People say the craziest stuff on forums because they know I can't reach out a jack their jaw ! ...

The TT is the best helping site, hands down.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Keep in mind AJ that I just went through a hellacious rookie campaign, running the NE and then being dispatched into the bowels (NYC and Jersey City). Even the yard jockey was surprised I was sent to Jersey City on my 4th day on the job. But, it will get easier. In the long run, I will have these routes down to a routine and will not have to go anywhere I haven't already been. Shortly, I'll get my run where I'm going to the same place, over and over again. What some OTR drivers refer to as 'adventure,' I can honestly say that I'd rather not go to different places all the time. I"ll take my boring runs, over and over again, to a terminal rather than a shipper / receiver. Plus I'll be home every day w/ two days off soon enough.

So, don't be scared by my last post in my thread. It's rather a drop in the bucket compared to the amount of time I'll have driving where I'll be very familiar with the same destinations. I'd say that my job will eventually be one of the lowest stress trucking jobs available, but like any new trucking job, there will always be some initial dues to pay upfront.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

mountain girl's Comment
member avatar

Here's the unhelpful but sarcastic answer:

The least stressful job for the rookie driver ---- the jobs that the experienced drivers get

-mountain girl

rofl-3.gif

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More