Usa Truck

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Driver U.'s Comment
member avatar

Usa truck continues to push the rules by forcing the drivers to break the 11 14 and 70 her rule each week. Weekend dispatchers are not required to check on driver hours before sending dispatchs. They will not inform you of any information until you confirm the load assignments. Once you have confirmed the assignment you cannot drop the assignment and must pick up and deliver on there schedual. On holidays they do not confirm that the shipper or receiver will.be open. You will be expected to stay at the shipper or receiver until they do open because you cannot drop the assignment. Equipment repairs are continuous due to the way the pm are actually completed. Minimal repairs are all they will do to get you moving again. They expect drivers to pay for and repair minor parts with a possible repayment if the dispatchers remember.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

Usa truck continues to push the rules by forcing the drivers to break the 11 14 and 70 her rule each week. Weekend dispatchers are not required to check on driver hours before sending dispatchs. They will not inform you of any information until you confirm the load assignments. Once you have confirmed the assignment you cannot drop the assignment and must pick up and deliver on there schedual. On holidays they do not confirm that the shipper or receiver will.be open. You will be expected to stay at the shipper or receiver until they do open because you cannot drop the assignment. Equipment repairs are continuous due to the way the pm are actually completed. Minimal repairs are all they will do to get you moving again. They expect drivers to pay for and repair minor parts with a possible repayment if the dispatchers remember.

report them, if they fire you for refusing to break HoS i am sure you have recourse.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Driver U.'s Comment
member avatar

I've talked to my safety officer, she just says well you accepted the hours of the assignment so your at fault.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Holy crap dude! I heard they were a good company to drive for. There has to be an outside source where you can report this. Hopefully one of the gurus will get on here and let you know.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Driver U, welcome to the forum!

You didn't share with us how long you've been driving, but I'm going to take a wild guess that you are pretty new to this industry. Your post indicates a real misunderstanding about how HOS violations not only have a negative effect on the drivers, but also have a negative effect on the company's CSA score. Companies don't intentionally try to mess up their CSA scores. Every successful driver wants to be pushing his hours - I'm bumping up against the clock all the time. It just so happens that when you are up against the clock that shows that you are productive, and it also shows on your paycheck that you know how to play this game like a true professional. If you want to make some real money at this you will always be running out your clock - if you are not you are leaving way too many miles on the table.

The driver makes the final call on whether he will violate the rules or not. There is no physical way that manager can get in that truck and force you to break the rules. You have got to be the professional who knows how to manage his time and know whether you can commit to a load or not. If you get a load that can't be done then you just let them know. It is as clear cut as that. It is not your driver managers responsibility to keep up with your hours, and I sure wouldn't ever count on weekend dispatch to be watching out for me.

I've talked to my safety officer, she just says well you accepted the hours of the assignment so your at fault.

As harsh as it may seem to you, your safety officer is correct. You are the one responsible. One of the worse elements of being a driver manager is the element of having to babysit grown adults day in and day out. They grow weary of this stuff. Be the kind of driver who amazes his manager at getting things accomplished. The top drivers in any fleet do this stuff day in and day out. The managers give them loads and they somehow magically figure out how to make it work. If it is going to be impossible, they tell the manager and they will see if they can get a delivery appointment changed or whatever needs to happen so that it can be done legally.

I'm sure there are drivers at USA Truck who are getting all the miles they can handle, and making top dollar without experiencing the problems that you've accused the company of causing you. The reason I can say that with confidence is because that is true at almost any major carrier. This is where you need to focus your efforts. Work hard at your trip planning and being fully aware of what kind of hours you have available to you. Refuse to run a load that can't be done, but learn to manage those clocks so that you are the guy that they can depend on to be the one who somehow always manages to be able to pull things off. That is the way I built my reputation as a top tier driver, and it will work for you also. Once you have established yourself as a truly professional driver who understands how the game is played the load planners will be looking for your truck when they need some help with some really good loads. The guys who can always seem to get the job done are the guys who keep getting the "good stuff".

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Every successful driver wants to be pushing his hours - I'm bumping up against the clock all the time. It just so happens that when you are up against the clock that shows that you are productive, and it also shows on your paycheck that you know how to play this game like a true professional. If you want to make some real money at this you will always be running out your clock - if you are not you are leaving way too many miles on the table.

I'm sure there are drivers at USA Truck who are getting all the miles they can handle, and making top dollar without experiencing the problems that you've accused the company of causing you. The reason I can say that with confidence is because that is true at almost any major carrier. This is where you need to focus your efforts. Work hard at your trip planning and being fully aware of what kind of hours you have available to you. Refuse to run a load that can't be done, but learn to manage those clocks so that you are the guy that they can depend on to be the one who somehow always manages to be able to pull things off. That is the way I built my reputation as a top tier driver, and it will work for you also. Once you have established yourself as a truly professional driver who understands how the game is played the load planners will be looking for your truck when they need some help with some really good loads. The guys who can always seem to get the job done are the guys who keep getting the "good stuff".

Even better. And, of course, completely accurate. See, guru.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

Driver U, welcome to the forum!

You didn't share with us how long you've been driving, but I'm going to take a wild guess that you are pretty new to this industry. Your post indicates a real misunderstanding about how HOS violations not only have a negative effect on the drivers, but also have a negative effect on the company's CSA score. Companies don't intentionally try to mess up their CSA scores. Every successful driver wants to be pushing his hours - I'm bumping up against the clock all the time. It just so happens that when you are up against the clock that shows that you are productive, and it also shows on your paycheck that you know how to play this game like a true professional. If you want to make some real money at this you will always be running out your clock - if you are not you are leaving way too many miles on the table.

The driver makes the final call on whether he will violate the rules or not. There is no physical way that manager can get in that truck and force you to break the rules. You have got to be the professional who knows how to manage his time and know whether you can commit to a load or not. If you get a load that can't be done then you just let them know. It is as clear cut as that. It is not your driver managers responsibility to keep up with your hours, and I sure wouldn't ever count on weekend dispatch to be watching out for me.

double-quotes-start.png

I've talked to my safety officer, she just says well you accepted the hours of the assignment so your at fault.

double-quotes-end.png

As harsh as it may seem to you, your safety officer is correct. You are the one responsible. One of the worse elements of being a driver manager is the element of having to babysit grown adults day in and day out. They grow weary of this stuff. Be the kind of driver who amazes his manager at getting things accomplished. The top drivers in any fleet do this stuff day in and day out. The managers give them loads and they somehow magically figure out how to make it work. If it is going to be impossible, they tell the manager and they will see if they can get a delivery appointment changed or whatever needs to happen so that it can be done legally.

I'm sure there are drivers at USA Truck who are getting all the miles they can handle, and making top dollar without experiencing the problems that you've accused the company of causing you. The reason I can say that with confidence is because that is true at almost any major carrier. This is where you need to focus your efforts. Work hard at your trip planning and being fully aware of what kind of hours you have available to you. Refuse to run a load that can't be done, but learn to manage those clocks so that you are the guy that they can depend on to be the one who somehow always manages to be able to pull things off. That is the way I built my reputation as a top tier driver, and it will work for you also. Once you have established yourself as a truly professional driver who understands how the game is played the load planners will be looking for your truck when they need some help with some really good loads. The guys who can always seem to get the job done are the guys who keep getting the "good stuff".

my only question is how do you bump up against the clockwhile not having to reset?

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Driver U.'s Comment
member avatar

Been with them 2 yes so far 1.5 is how long they require to pay for the driver training

Driver U.'s Comment
member avatar

Today's schedual 10 break ends at 11 am hebron ky First Pu 11:30 Dayton oh Drop nashville 1600 Pu nashville 1600 Drop Atlanta 0100

Bel A.'s Comment
member avatar

Today's schedual 10 break ends at 11 am hebron ky First Pu 11:30 Dayton oh Drop nashville 1600 Pu nashville 1600 Drop Atlanta 0100

Dayton - Hebron is 70 miles. Unless you've got a 13 speed with 2.64 rears, and a police escort - I'm not sure you'll make that pickup on time - !

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