GPS Alternatives.

Topic 6026 | Page 1

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Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

So I'm trying to avoid paying for something I don't need like a Rand Mcnally GPS. How useful is this thing for you guys? I normally use the paper map and call the consignee for directions. (because our quallcomm directions suck) What I need most of all are GPS maps to get to the shipper/consignee so that I know which lane to be in and how far they are from the main routes. Is a smartphone a better investment?

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

Oh yeah, and I was wondering if you guys prefer the 5 inch or 7 inch screen, and if you know of any sales/deal on the RM 530 or 730 in case I pick one up.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

Oh yeah, and I was wondering if you guys prefer the 5 inch or 7 inch screen, and if you know of any sales/deal on the RM 530 or 730 in case I pick one up.

The only difference between the two is the 730 has a larger screen and easier to read. You might try going onto the Rand site to see if you can get a refurbished one a little cheaper. Normally will only have a 90 day warranty, but that should not be an issue.

Ernie

Skarbrand's Comment
member avatar

Pretty good question...I actually (unfortunately) got really used to GPS. I know it's not the best tool compared to an atlas, but a Rand McNally should be accurate, no? I imagine it being more accurate than a phone (car GPS).

Eckoh's Comment
member avatar

I have a 720 i got it for sale on Amazon for 260. Its worked great so far, the reason i went with the rand is according to them its got everything in it their atlas does... so if it gets you lost so would the atlas.

I think the 730 is 370 on amazon right now.

ButtonUp's Comment
member avatar

I like the GPS because it's easy to find a truck stop about where your hours are going to run out, or in general. It's easy to find an alternate route on the fly without having to find a place to pull over. I like the Rand McNally because of the information that is displayed on the map screen... mile marker, nearest cross street, city, county, etc. I prefer the smaller screen because, quite frankly, if you are in a Peterbilt or Kenworth, a bigger screen blocks too much of the windshield. Some people mount them on their door window... or high in the air. I prefer to have it low in the middle of the windshield so I don't have to take my eyes off the road if I need to poke at it.

If you are running team then one person can pull out the truckstop book, atlas, or whatever, but the GPS just makes it easier. I still have the atlas in case "things get real."

ATXJEHU's Comment
member avatar

I have the RM 5" and it works well, but a trainee brought along a RM 7" one time and it is sooo much easier to read all of the info. Nevertheless, never totally trust the GPS for accurate directions. It will eventually get you into trouble; also, sometimes it simply won't produce the address that you need; it will say that it's not a valid address, then what will you do?

I have learned the hard way that it is best to always check the QC routing against the paper atlas first; then call the shipper or consignee (good luck with that; about half the time it's not a good number!) to confirm the directions; then write the main roads/turns down in your palm size notepad; then put the address into the GPS. If it matches, terrific! If it does not match, follow your written route and let the GPS "catch up" with where you are going.

And as ButtonUp said, it is all of the other relevant info available on the RM GPS that makes it worth the money in my view, not mainly as a primary route finder. I drove my first week out without a GPS before caving in and buying one. Having it reduces the stress greatly by being alerted to which lanes will be going in what direction and what streets/intersections are just ahead, not to mention the info on truck stops/rest stops, miles to destination, ETA, etc. I would not leave home without it.

I will add that my android smart phone with google maps is also a big help in being able to scope out where the shipping/receiving areas are at the customers. More often than not, the address you have is to the front offices, not to where you need to go to deliver. With one shipment last week, it took me four different stops on the customer's property before I finally got to where I needed to be.

Any way, good luck to you!

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar

I have the RM 5" and it works well, but a trainee brought along a RM 7" one time and it is sooo much easier to read all of the info. Nevertheless, never totally trust the GPS for accurate directions. It will eventually get you into trouble; also, sometimes it simply won't produce the address that you need; it will say that it's not a valid address, then what will you do?

I have learned the hard way that it is best to always check the QC routing against the paper atlas first; then call the shipper or consignee (good luck with that; about half the time it's not a good number!) to confirm the directions; then write the main roads/turns down in your palm size notepad; then put the address into the GPS. If it matches, terrific! If it does not match, follow your written route and let the GPS "catch up" with where you are going.

And as ButtonUp said, it is all of the other relevant info available on the RM GPS that makes it worth the money in my view, not mainly as a primary route finder. I drove my first week out without a GPS before caving in and buying one. Having it reduces the stress greatly by being alerted to which lanes will be going in what direction and what streets/intersections are just ahead, not to mention the info on truck stops/rest stops, miles to destination, ETA, etc. I would not leave home without it.

I will add that my android smart phone with google maps is also a big help in being able to scope out where the shipping/receiving areas are at the customers. More often than not, the address you have is to the front offices, not to where you need to go to deliver. With one shipment last week, it took me four different stops on the customer's property before I finally got to where I needed to be.

Any way, good luck to you!

Thanks mate, that's the info I wanted. Looks like a good investment then. Worst case scenario, I end up selling it on ebay.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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