A Month Of Trucking With Daniel B.

Topic 6390 | Page 16

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Daniel B.'s Comment
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Hey Daniel. Do you happen to be a trainer at prime?

I'm not a trainer, I'm an Instructor. I call myself retired, but that's truly only because I haven't found that person to come out of retirement for. Instructors are constantly looking for that easy student, you just never know who's watching. :)

My priority is to get a good local job, but if that doesn't work out I might consider getting back on the training saddle.

Sandman's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

Hey Daniel. Do you happen to be a trainer at prime?

double-quotes-end.png

I'm not a trainer, I'm an Instructor. I call myself retired, but that's truly only because I haven't found that person to come out of retirement for. Instructors are constantly looking for that easy student, you just never know who's watching. :)

My priority is to get a good local job, but if that doesn't work out I might consider getting back on the training saddle.

Wish you would consider training for prime. I'm scheduled to be going to psd training on the 9th of February. Learned a lot from this thread. thank you for your time. Now enjoy that time off man.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Snappy's Comment
member avatar

Daniel, I can't tell you how much this thread helped me out this first full month of solo driving. Thank you sir, it's been a godsend.

One question I have about the maneuvers you did getting into your spot at the last place you mapped out -- would it have been possible to pull in forward, turn left up the same lane to the north, and then back in to the dock? Or is it to avoid a blindside back if you get one of the docks farther east? Or is that just how they want it done there?

Thanks again for this thread! It kind of makes me want to do one of my own -- more to "let" you experienced guys coach me, and let the folks still in school know more of what challenges and pitfalls they might expect, and how they can face them better than I did!

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't say much because I'm not driving at this time because I lost my cdl cuz it expired but reading your threads is like being in the driver seat all over again I wish I had my cdl and on the road again...... Thanks for everything

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Hey Daniel - Enjoy your home time. I've also enjoyed reading your thread. Here's to a Happy New Year and wishing your family the best - hoping you find that local job. Thinking about linehaul at all? I know you had mentioned Fed Ex Freight a while back.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
PanamaExpat's Comment
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All good things must end and this thread was a good thing. Had a great time reading it and was always looking forwards to your updates.Thanks Daniel. Happy New Year to you and yours and here's hoping you find that local job you are looking for.

David's Comment
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One question I have about the maneuvers you did getting into your spot at the last place you mapped out -- would it have been possible to pull in forward, turn left up the same lane to the north, and then back in to the dock? Or is it to avoid a blindside back if you get one of the docks farther east? Or is that just how they want it done there?

Most drivers will avoid doing blind side backs. I do, and from taking to Daniel personally, I don't think he cares much for it either. If there's away to back on drivers side, then do it. Less chance of an accident.

Daniel thanks for the good read sir.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry late replies, I was "taking a little break" haha!

Snappy,

Unfortunately this place was a lot more packed than the image shows. The images on Google Earth are usually outdated, but they still give you a good heads up on the area. There were 4 additional trailers scattered at the facility that the image doesn't show. It's that I was simply not confident about driving in there head first. I could have maybe done it, but it would have been extremely tight and as David mentioned, it would have been a blindside and I avoid those at all costs. There was no easy answer, but I chose what I thought was the lesser of two evils.

6 String,

I actually decided against that FedEx opportunity. Turns out I'll be working for an O/O and I just think that too risky. That, and I would have been a 1099. Not a good deal. I have actually applied at a few Linehaul/LTL companies in the area but haven't ever heard back from any of them. Based on my research, this area is just terrible for LTL.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

BONUS CONTENT

Here's my month summary- my miles and pay. All numbers are extremely accurate and I have verified the below information multiple times. These are paid miles only.

December Summary.

3rd - does not count because all loads paying out on this date were loads done in November.

10th - 3979 miles. I took home 1559.89$.

17th - 2905 miles. I took home 1258.71$.

24th - 1511 miles. I took home 619.16$.

3st - 3645 miles. I took home 1364.97$.

Total miles for the month: 12,783.

For a profit of 4,900$.

A good month, but not my very best. The weather slowed me down more times than I can count.

Now realize, I'm an experienced driver making more than the typical rookie and I'm also an established driver in my fleet. You will not come close to these numbers in your first year. There is money to be made in trucking, but it takes time to start seeing it. If you want to know how I did financially in my first year then check out my thread below. As you'll find out, I'm making a heck of a lot more my second year than my first year. Experience pays, especially in a performance-based job.

Daniel B.'s Exact First Year Income!

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Yep, that sounds familiar. I believe most if not all Fed Ex Freight is contracted out to O/O, probably has something to do with the pay being a little lower than the average linehaul gig. The Fed Ex Freight outfit I know of around here is O/O. I can see why you didn't take the job. I hope some of those applications pan out for you.

I sent you a pm.

Enjoy the rest of your hometime!

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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